Nourish Balance Thrive http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/ The Nourish Balance Thrive podcast is designed to help you perform better. Christopher Kelly, your host, is co-founder of Nourish Balance Thrive, an online clinic using advanced biochemical testing to optimize performance in athletes. On the podcast, Chris interviews leading minds in medicine, nutrition and health, as well as world-class athletes and members of the NBT team, to give you up-to-date information on the lifestyle changes and personalized techniques being used to make people go faster – from weekend warriors to Olympians and world champions.

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en-us ℗ & © 2017 Nourish Balance Thrive. All rights reserved. cck197@cck197.net Fitness & Nutrition Django Web Framework http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/media/podcasts/shows/img/logo_white_600x600.jpg Nourish Balance Thrive http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/ Nourish Balance Thrive Christopher Kelly cck197@cck197.net The Nourish Balance Thrive podcast is designed to help you perform better. Christopher Kelly, your host, is co-founder of Nourish Balance Thrive, an online clinic using advanced biochemical testing to optimize performance in athletes. On the podcast, Chris interviews leading minds in medicine, nutrition and health, as well as world-class athletes and members of the NBT team, to give you up-to-date information on the lifestyle changes and personalized techniques being used to make people go faster – from weekend warriors to Olympians and world champions. no The Keto Masterclass with Robb Wolf https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Robb.Wolf.171106.mp3 This episode is a roundtable discussion with Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and New York Times best-selling author Robb Wolf on Robb’s new Keto Masterclass, a 45-day program to kickstart your keto lifestyle.

The masterclass is an online training course that I completed ahead of recording this episode. Think of the class as a comprehensive instruction manual complete with troubleshooting guide for fat loss and improved metabolic health. If you’re brand new, the course is perfect for you. If you’ve been living the lifestyle for some time, it may still be helpful to read the manual to see if there’s anything you’ve missed.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Robb Wolf and Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:01:15] Ken Ford on STEM-Talk.

[00:01:33] Books: The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet, Wired to Eat: Turn Off Cravings, Rewire Your Appetite for Weight Loss, and Determine the Foods That Work for You.

[00:03:34] CrossFit.

[00:05:28] Ryan Levesque, Ask Method.

[00:07:30] Blog: Optimizing Cycling Stage Race Performance using Nutritional Ketosis by Sami Inkinen.

[00:10:05] The course is for the Weight Watchers crowd.

[00:12:50] Facebook Video: Paleo vs keto video with Robb and Nicki.

[00:14:42] The NBT 7-minute analysis.

[00:16:10] Facebook Group: Richard Nikoley's Ketotard Chronicles.

[00:17:00] Mike Rowe and Dirty Jobs.

[00:19:28] When are you fixed?

[00:20:10] Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You by Joseph R. Kraft to learn about the Kraft test (5 hour GTT), Lipoprotein Insulin Resistance Index (LP-IR): A Lipoprotein Particle–Derived Measure of Insulin Resistance.

[00:20:34] 7-day carb test.

[00:20:59] Eating while the sun is up.

[00:22:16] Full carnivore, ketotic.org guys.

[00:22:59] The Keto Summit.

[00:23:33] Ketogains.

[00:23:48] Electrolytes.

[00:24:47] Calories and food quality matter.

[00:25:55] Thyroid and adrenal issues.

[00:27:01] Undereating.

[00:28:09] Doc Parsley’s Sleep Remedy.

[00:28:27] Blog: Virta Health: Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[00:28:58] Managing symptoms.

[00:30:11] Warren Buffett.

[00:30:48] Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[00:31:46] Loren Cordain, PhD on sodium.

[00:33:38] Jeff Volek, PhD, RD.

[00:33:53] Book: The Salt Fix: Why the Experts Got It All Wrong--and How Eating More Might Save Your Life by James DiNicolantonio.

[00:34:56] Sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium (be careful).

[00:36:22] Studies: DeFronzo, R. A. "The effect of insulin on renal sodium metabolism." Diabetologia 21.3 (1981): 165-171 and Brands, Michael W., and M. Marlina Manhiani. "Sodium-retaining effect of insulin in diabetes." American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology 303.11 (2012): R1101-R1109.

[00:37:35] Presentation: Oxidative Stress & Carbohydrate Intolerance: An Ancestral Perspective by Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:39:05] Ted Naiman ways to enter ketosis infographic.

[00:40:50] Pitocin, brand name medication for oxytocin.  

[00:42:33] Marty Kendall’s Nutrient Optimiser.

[00:44:41] Metabolic flexibility and undereating.

[00:46:21] Podcasts: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea with Mike T. Nelson and The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athlete with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:46:42] Podcasts: National Cyclocross Champion Jeremy Powers on Racing, Training and the Ketogenic Diet and National Cyclocross Champion Katie Compton on Ketosis and MTHFR.

[00:47:07] Keto-mojo meter.

[00:48:17] What to measure.

[00:49:57] Myostatin inhibition.

[00:50:37] Study:  Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546 and Podcast: A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice with Megan Hall.

[00:53:24] Metformin works so well because of multiple mechanisms.

[00:54:03] Acetone.

[00:54:35] Cori cycle.

[00:55:49] Book: The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany.

[00:56:41] Tracking body mass.

[00:57:37] Performance benchmarks.

[00:59:03] Simon Marshall and Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall.

[00:59:31] Paul Itoi, senza.us.

[01:00:25] Loss aversion.

[01:01:27] Podcast: Breaking Through Plateaus and Sustainable Fat-Loss with Jason Seib.

[01:02:04] Studies: Bistrian, Bruce R., et al. "Nitrogen metabolism and insulin requirements in obese diabetic adults on a protein-sparing modified fast." Diabetes 25.6 (1976): 494-504 and Furber, Matthew, et al. "A 7-day high protein hypocaloric diet promotes cellular metabolic adaptations and attenuates lean mass loss in healthy males." Clinical Nutrition Experimental(2017).

[01:06:30] Very similar weight loss regardless of the diet.

[01:07:11] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: The way to a man's heart is through the stomach with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:09:44] Keto Masterclass details.

[01:10:19] Epigenetics.

[01:12:13] Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More! with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:13:21] Price $49!

[01:15:28] Get Keto Masterclass.

[01:16:30] Ivor Cummins.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Robb.Wolf.171106.mp3 Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:11:05 GMT Christopher Kelly This episode is a roundtable discussion with Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and New York Times best-selling author Robb Wolf on Robb’s new Keto Masterclass, a 45-day program to kickstart your keto lifestyle.

The masterclass is an online training course that I completed ahead of recording this episode. Think of the class as a comprehensive instruction manual complete with troubleshooting guide for fat loss and improved metabolic health. If you’re brand new, the course is perfect for you. If you’ve been living the lifestyle for some time, it may still be helpful to read the manual to see if there’s anything you’ve missed.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Robb Wolf and Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:01:15] Ken Ford on STEM-Talk.

[00:01:33] Books: The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet, Wired to Eat: Turn Off Cravings, Rewire Your Appetite for Weight Loss, and Determine the Foods That Work for You.

[00:03:34] CrossFit.

[00:05:28] Ryan Levesque, Ask Method.

[00:07:30] Blog: Optimizing Cycling Stage Race Performance using Nutritional Ketosis by Sami Inkinen.

[00:10:05] The course is for the Weight Watchers crowd.

[00:12:50] Facebook Video: Paleo vs keto video with Robb and Nicki.

[00:14:42] The NBT 7-minute analysis.

[00:16:10] Facebook Group: Richard Nikoley's Ketotard Chronicles.

[00:17:00] Mike Rowe and Dirty Jobs.

[00:19:28] When are you fixed?

[00:20:10] Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You by Joseph R. Kraft to learn about the Kraft test (5 hour GTT), Lipoprotein Insulin Resistance Index (LP-IR): A Lipoprotein Particle–Derived Measure of Insulin Resistance.

[00:20:34] 7-day carb test.

[00:20:59] Eating while the sun is up.

[00:22:16] Full carnivore, ketotic.org guys.

[00:22:59] The Keto Summit.

[00:23:33] Ketogains.

[00:23:48] Electrolytes.

[00:24:47] Calories and food quality matter.

[00:25:55] Thyroid and adrenal issues.

[00:27:01] Undereating.

[00:28:09] Doc Parsley’s Sleep Remedy.

[00:28:27] Blog: Virta Health: Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[00:28:58] Managing symptoms.

[00:30:11] Warren Buffett.

[00:30:48] Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[00:31:46] Loren Cordain, PhD on sodium.

[00:33:38] Jeff Volek, PhD, RD.

[00:33:53] Book: The Salt Fix: Why the Experts Got It All Wrong--and How Eating More Might Save Your Life by James DiNicolantonio.

[00:34:56] Sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium (be careful).

[00:36:22] Studies: DeFronzo, R. A. "The effect of insulin on renal sodium metabolism." Diabetologia 21.3 (1981): 165-171 and Brands, Michael W., and M. Marlina Manhiani. "Sodium-retaining effect of insulin in diabetes." American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology 303.11 (2012): R1101-R1109.

[00:37:35] Presentation: Oxidative Stress & Carbohydrate Intolerance: An Ancestral Perspective by Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:39:05] Ted Naiman ways to enter ketosis infographic.

[00:40:50] Pitocin, brand name medication for oxytocin.  

[00:42:33] Marty Kendall’s Nutrient Optimiser.

[00:44:41] Metabolic flexibility and undereating.

[00:46:21] Podcasts: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea with Mike T. Nelson and The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athlete with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:46:42] Podcasts: National Cyclocross Champion Jeremy Powers on Racing, Training and the Ketogenic Diet and National Cyclocross Champion Katie Compton on Ketosis and MTHFR.

[00:47:07] Keto-mojo meter.

[00:48:17] What to measure.

[00:49:57] Myostatin inhibition.

[00:50:37] Study:  Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546 and Podcast: A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice with Megan Hall.

[00:53:24] Metformin works so well because of multiple mechanisms.

[00:54:03] Acetone.

[00:54:35] Cori cycle.

[00:55:49] Book: The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany.

[00:56:41] Tracking body mass.

[00:57:37] Performance benchmarks.

[00:59:03] Simon Marshall and Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall.

[00:59:31] Paul Itoi, senza.us.

[01:00:25] Loss aversion.

[01:01:27] Podcast: Breaking Through Plateaus and Sustainable Fat-Loss with Jason Seib.

[01:02:04] Studies: Bistrian, Bruce R., et al. "Nitrogen metabolism and insulin requirements in obese diabetic adults on a protein-sparing modified fast." Diabetes 25.6 (1976): 494-504 and Furber, Matthew, et al. "A 7-day high protein hypocaloric diet promotes cellular metabolic adaptations and attenuates lean mass loss in healthy males." Clinical Nutrition Experimental(2017).

[01:06:30] Very similar weight loss regardless of the diet.

[01:07:11] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: The way to a man's heart is through the stomach with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:09:44] Keto Masterclass details.

[01:10:19] Epigenetics.

[01:12:13] Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More! with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:13:21] Price $49!

[01:15:28] Get Keto Masterclass.

[01:16:30] Ivor Cummins.

]]>
yes
The True Root Causes of Cardiovascular Disease https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Jeff.Gerber.Work.on.2017-10-31.at.11.43.mp3 Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP is a board-certified family physician and owner of South Suburban Family Medicine in Littleton, Colorado, where he is known as “Denver’s Diet Doctor”. He has been providing personalized healthcare to the local community since 1993 and continues that tradition with an emphasis on longevity, wellness and prevention.

In this interview, Dr Gerber describes the major root causes of cardiovascular disease, the most important of which is insulin-resistant Type 2 Diabetes.

Worried about your heart disease risk? Get a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score.

Your CAC score (and the rate of progression of your CAC score) is probably the best easily-available predictor of cardiac events. A recent paper from the CARDIA study also showed that an elevated CAC score was highly predictive of long-term heart disease risk in younger adults (18-30 year-olds).

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Jeffry N. Gerber, MD:

[00:01:27] Clinical experience.

[00:02:27] Interest in low-carb diets.

[00:03:21] Presentation: Ivor Cummins: “Roads to Ruin?” The Pathways and Implications of Insulin Resistance.

[00:03:38] Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You by Joseph R. Kraft.

[00:04:23] Professor Grant Schofield and Catherine Crofts, PhD. Podcast: Hyperinsulinaemia and Cognitive Decline with Catherine Crofts, PhD.

[00:05:08] Hyperinsulinemia and CVD.

[00:06:39] The 2 hour insulin test < 30 UI/mL.

[00:07:20] Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa, et al. "One-hour postload hyperglycemia is a stronger predictor of type 2 diabetes than impaired fasting glucose." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 100.10 (2015): 3744-3751.

[00:07:51] < 5 UI/mL fasting insulin.

[00:10:40] What causes CVD?

[00:11:49] Carl von Rokitansky.

[00:12:02] Rudolf Virchow.

[00:12:19] Blog: Dr. Malcolm Kendrick.

[00:13:49] Russell Ross.

[00:15:40] List of things that cause CVD.

[00:16:44] Nitric Oxide.

[00:17:43] Jerry Reaven.

[00:19:19] Vega, Gloria Lena, et al. "Triglyceride–to–high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio is an index of heart disease mortality and of incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men." Journal of Investigative Medicine 62.2 (2014): 345-349.

[00:20:17] The Framingham study.

[00:21:53] LDL-P and advanced testing.

[00:22:32] CAC score.

[00:23:41] Intimal media thickness.

[00:26:11] Ordering a scan.

[00:26:41] 64-slice EBCT machine.

[00:27:08] Valenti, Valentina, et al. "A 15-year warranty period for asymptomatic individuals without coronary artery calcium: a prospective follow-up of 9,715 individuals." JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging 8.8 (2015): 900-909.

[00:28:15] Soft plaque.

[00:28:57] CT angiogram.

[00:29:44] Don't let perfect be the enemy of very good.

[00:30:34] How to get a zero score.

[00:31:28] Industrial seed oils.

[00:32:02] D3/K2, magnesium, vitamin C.

[00:33:29] Statins.

[00:33:47] Absolute risk reduction data.

[00:34:13] Ridker, Paul M., et al. "Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein." New England Journal of Medicine 359.21 (2008): 2195.

[00:34:40] NICE guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease.

[00:36:45] Studies: Puri, Rishi, et al. "Impact of statins on serial coronary calcification during atheroma progression and regression." Journal of the American College of Cardiology 65.13 (2015): 1273-1282, Sattar, Naveed, et al. "Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials." The Lancet 375.9716 (2010): 735-742, and Preiss, David, et al. "Risk of incident diabetes with intensive-dose compared with moderate-dose statin therapy: a meta-analysis." Jama 305.24 (2011): 2556-2564.

[00:37:22] Interview: Calcification and CAC with the Expert: Professor Matthew J. Budoff, MD, FAAC, Part 1 and Professor Matthew J. Budoff Part 2: Primary Care Physicians and CAC.

[00:37:41] Book: Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity by Ivor Cummins and Dr. Jeffry Gerber – February 6, 2018.

[00:38:50] Four body types: Skinny, insulin-resistant type, the overweight, typical T2 diabetic type, the overweight, insulin-sensitive type, and the metabolically healthy type.

[00:40:50] Conference: Low-Carb Breckenridge 2018.

[00:41:28] Dr Rod Tayler.

[00:42:25] Dr Andrew Mentee and the PURE study.

[00:42:46] List of speakers at Low-Carb Breckenridge 2018.

[00:43:06] IHMC STEM-Talk Episode 41: Dr David Diamond talks about the role of fat, cholesterol, and statin drugs in heart disease.        

[00:44:15] Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP.

[00:45:27] Rebuttal: 9NEWS – Explaining the science behind the keto diet with Dr Jeffrey Gerber.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Jeff.Gerber.Work.on.2017-10-31.at.11.43.mp3 Fri, 17 Nov 2017 17:11:13 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP is a board-certified family physician and owner of South Suburban Family Medicine in Littleton, Colorado, where he is known as “Denver’s Diet Doctor”. He has been providing personalized healthcare to the local community since 1993 and continues that tradition with an emphasis on longevity, wellness and prevention.

In this interview, Dr Gerber describes the major root causes of cardiovascular disease, the most important of which is insulin-resistant Type 2 Diabetes.

Worried about your heart disease risk? Get a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score.

Your CAC score (and the rate of progression of your CAC score) is probably the best easily-available predictor of cardiac events. A recent paper from the CARDIA study also showed that an elevated CAC score was highly predictive of long-term heart disease risk in younger adults (18-30 year-olds).

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Jeffry N. Gerber, MD:

[00:01:27] Clinical experience.

[00:02:27] Interest in low-carb diets.

[00:03:21] Presentation: Ivor Cummins: “Roads to Ruin?” The Pathways and Implications of Insulin Resistance.

[00:03:38] Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You by Joseph R. Kraft.

[00:04:23] Professor Grant Schofield and Catherine Crofts, PhD. Podcast: Hyperinsulinaemia and Cognitive Decline with Catherine Crofts, PhD.

[00:05:08] Hyperinsulinemia and CVD.

[00:06:39] The 2 hour insulin test < 30 UI/mL.

[00:07:20] Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa, et al. "One-hour postload hyperglycemia is a stronger predictor of type 2 diabetes than impaired fasting glucose." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 100.10 (2015): 3744-3751.

[00:07:51] < 5 UI/mL fasting insulin.

[00:10:40] What causes CVD?

[00:11:49] Carl von Rokitansky.

[00:12:02] Rudolf Virchow.

[00:12:19] Blog: Dr. Malcolm Kendrick.

[00:13:49] Russell Ross.

[00:15:40] List of things that cause CVD.

[00:16:44] Nitric Oxide.

[00:17:43] Jerry Reaven.

[00:19:19] Vega, Gloria Lena, et al. "Triglyceride–to–high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio is an index of heart disease mortality and of incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in men." Journal of Investigative Medicine 62.2 (2014): 345-349.

[00:20:17] The Framingham study.

[00:21:53] LDL-P and advanced testing.

[00:22:32] CAC score.

[00:23:41] Intimal media thickness.

[00:26:11] Ordering a scan.

[00:26:41] 64-slice EBCT machine.

[00:27:08] Valenti, Valentina, et al. "A 15-year warranty period for asymptomatic individuals without coronary artery calcium: a prospective follow-up of 9,715 individuals." JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging 8.8 (2015): 900-909.

[00:28:15] Soft plaque.

[00:28:57] CT angiogram.

[00:29:44] Don't let perfect be the enemy of very good.

[00:30:34] How to get a zero score.

[00:31:28] Industrial seed oils.

[00:32:02] D3/K2, magnesium, vitamin C.

[00:33:29] Statins.

[00:33:47] Absolute risk reduction data.

[00:34:13] Ridker, Paul M., et al. "Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein." New England Journal of Medicine 359.21 (2008): 2195.

[00:34:40] NICE guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease.

[00:36:45] Studies: Puri, Rishi, et al. "Impact of statins on serial coronary calcification during atheroma progression and regression." Journal of the American College of Cardiology 65.13 (2015): 1273-1282, Sattar, Naveed, et al. "Statins and risk of incident diabetes: a collaborative meta-analysis of randomised statin trials." The Lancet 375.9716 (2010): 735-742, and Preiss, David, et al. "Risk of incident diabetes with intensive-dose compared with moderate-dose statin therapy: a meta-analysis." Jama 305.24 (2011): 2556-2564.

[00:37:22] Interview: Calcification and CAC with the Expert: Professor Matthew J. Budoff, MD, FAAC, Part 1 and Professor Matthew J. Budoff Part 2: Primary Care Physicians and CAC.

[00:37:41] Book: Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity by Ivor Cummins and Dr. Jeffry Gerber – February 6, 2018.

[00:38:50] Four body types: Skinny, insulin-resistant type, the overweight, typical T2 diabetic type, the overweight, insulin-sensitive type, and the metabolically healthy type.

[00:40:50] Conference: Low-Carb Breckenridge 2018.

[00:41:28] Dr Rod Tayler.

[00:42:25] Dr Andrew Mentee and the PURE study.

[00:42:46] List of speakers at Low-Carb Breckenridge 2018.

[00:43:06] IHMC STEM-Talk Episode 41: Dr David Diamond talks about the role of fat, cholesterol, and statin drugs in heart disease.        

[00:44:15] Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP.

[00:45:27] Rebuttal: 9NEWS – Explaining the science behind the keto diet with Dr Jeffrey Gerber.

]]>
no
How to Understand Glucose Regulation https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/bryanpwalsh.on.2017-10-24.at.11.00.mp3 Bryan Walsh, our favourite doctor, teacher and critical thinker is back on the podcast to talk about perhaps one of the most import of health topics: blood glucose regulation.

Why care about blood glucose? Didn’t I test that already?

Isn’t it time to move on and start thinking about something a bit sexier?

In this interview, Bryan argues no, and that the low hanging fruit remains whilst many practitioners move onto the harder to reach or less important interventions. I’m looking at you, MTHFR!

You could listen to this podcast to learn something about a class of hormone called incretins, the first-phase insulin response, and the primary action of insulin. If you like what you hear, I’d highly recommend you sign up for Bryan’s new training course, Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Glucose Regulation.

Full disclosure: I am a true fan of Bryan’s. I buy everything he produces sight unseen. I’m always surprised and delighted by what I receive, and when listeners and clients ask me where I got my biochemistry and physiology education, I send them to Bryan. I pay full price for all Bryan’s work and there’s no financial affiliation.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Bryan Walsh, ND:

[00:00:15] Podcast: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:01:02] Cabbage Tree.

[00:02:36] Bridging the gap between conventional and naturopathic medicine.

[00:03:33] Sustained Health Engineering.

[00:04:43] Pellagra, Lyme Disease.

[00:05:32] Vitamin D.

[00:05:52] Article on Gizmodo: “Blowing Smoke Up Your Ass" Used to Be Literal.

[00:08:46] Blood glucose. Podcast: Poor Misunderstood Insulin with Dr Tommy Wood.  

[00:10:09] Infertility and libido.

[00:10:26] Depression and anxiety.

[00:10:50] HbA1c.

[00:11:56] Pathway ADD.

[00:12:40] Mapping the human genome.

[00:12:59] Microbiome.

[00:13:59] Low hanging fruit on a CBC paper.

[00:15:33] Blood glucose variability and long-term health.

[00:17:06] First phase insulin response.

[00:18:50] Second phase is insulin on demand.

[00:20:37] Blunted postprandial response is the earliest predictor of T2D.

[00:22:04] GlycoMark measures glycemic variability.

[00:24:26] GlycoMark < 15 indicates loss of the first phase insulin response.

[00:26:30] Glycated proteins, e.g. fructosamine.

[00:29:28] References for optimal ranges for fasting blood glucose.

[00:31:53] 80-90 mg/dL. Reference 1, 2, 3, and 4.

[00:33:36] Fasting blood glucose, how low should it go? References 1, 2, 3, and 4.

[00:34:23] Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Podcast: Jason Moore of EliteHRV.

[00:34:40] PCOS and Podcast: Dr Frassetto of the PCOS Paleo Study.

[00:35:23] Incretins, GLP-1

[00:37:18] Gabor Erdosi at the Lower Insulin Facebook group.

[00:37:49] The primary action of insulin is to suppress glucagon.

[00:38:51] GABA.

[00:39:30] What is insulin resistance? Where does it happen?

[00:41:26] GLUT-4 transporters.

[00:42:11] Ceramides.

[00:42:33] Insulin resistance is protective.

[00:45:30] Insulin might be a bad idea. Study: Nolan, Christopher J., et al. "Insulin resistance as a physiological defense against metabolic stress: implications for the management of subsets of type 2 diabetes." Diabetes 64.3 (2015): 673-686.

[00:48:13] What to do example.

[00:48:53] C-peptide.

[00:50:06] Chewing food and GLP-1. Study: Li, Jie, et al. "Improvement in chewing activity reduces energy intake in one meal and modulates plasma gut hormone concentrations in obese and lean young Chinese men." The American journal of clinical nutrition 94.3 (2011): 709-716.

[00:50:39] Quercetin, supplements.

[00:51:54] Course: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Glucose Dysregulation.

[00:55:19] Reactive hypoglycemia.

[00:57:06] 1,000 True Fans.

[00:58:09] For more from Dr Walsh check out: drwalsh.com, metabolicfitnesspro.com.

[00:59:10] Podcast: WAYYYY Beyond Diet & Exercise with Dr. Bryan Walsh.

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cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/bryanpwalsh.on.2017-10-24.at.11.00.mp3 Fri, 10 Nov 2017 08:11:55 GMT Christopher Kelly Bryan Walsh, our favourite doctor, teacher and critical thinker is back on the podcast to talk about perhaps one of the most import of health topics: blood glucose regulation.

Why care about blood glucose? Didn’t I test that already?

Isn’t it time to move on and start thinking about something a bit sexier?

In this interview, Bryan argues no, and that the low hanging fruit remains whilst many practitioners move onto the harder to reach or less important interventions. I’m looking at you, MTHFR!

You could listen to this podcast to learn something about a class of hormone called incretins, the first-phase insulin response, and the primary action of insulin. If you like what you hear, I’d highly recommend you sign up for Bryan’s new training course, Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Glucose Regulation.

Full disclosure: I am a true fan of Bryan’s. I buy everything he produces sight unseen. I’m always surprised and delighted by what I receive, and when listeners and clients ask me where I got my biochemistry and physiology education, I send them to Bryan. I pay full price for all Bryan’s work and there’s no financial affiliation.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Bryan Walsh, ND:

[00:00:15] Podcast: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:01:02] Cabbage Tree.

[00:02:36] Bridging the gap between conventional and naturopathic medicine.

[00:03:33] Sustained Health Engineering.

[00:04:43] Pellagra, Lyme Disease.

[00:05:32] Vitamin D.

[00:05:52] Article on Gizmodo: “Blowing Smoke Up Your Ass" Used to Be Literal.

[00:08:46] Blood glucose. Podcast: Poor Misunderstood Insulin with Dr Tommy Wood.  

[00:10:09] Infertility and libido.

[00:10:26] Depression and anxiety.

[00:10:50] HbA1c.

[00:11:56] Pathway ADD.

[00:12:40] Mapping the human genome.

[00:12:59] Microbiome.

[00:13:59] Low hanging fruit on a CBC paper.

[00:15:33] Blood glucose variability and long-term health.

[00:17:06] First phase insulin response.

[00:18:50] Second phase is insulin on demand.

[00:20:37] Blunted postprandial response is the earliest predictor of T2D.

[00:22:04] GlycoMark measures glycemic variability.

[00:24:26] GlycoMark < 15 indicates loss of the first phase insulin response.

[00:26:30] Glycated proteins, e.g. fructosamine.

[00:29:28] References for optimal ranges for fasting blood glucose.

[00:31:53] 80-90 mg/dL. Reference 1, 2, 3, and 4.

[00:33:36] Fasting blood glucose, how low should it go? References 1, 2, 3, and 4.

[00:34:23] Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and Podcast: Jason Moore of EliteHRV.

[00:34:40] PCOS and Podcast: Dr Frassetto of the PCOS Paleo Study.

[00:35:23] Incretins, GLP-1

[00:37:18] Gabor Erdosi at the Lower Insulin Facebook group.

[00:37:49] The primary action of insulin is to suppress glucagon.

[00:38:51] GABA.

[00:39:30] What is insulin resistance? Where does it happen?

[00:41:26] GLUT-4 transporters.

[00:42:11] Ceramides.

[00:42:33] Insulin resistance is protective.

[00:45:30] Insulin might be a bad idea. Study: Nolan, Christopher J., et al. "Insulin resistance as a physiological defense against metabolic stress: implications for the management of subsets of type 2 diabetes." Diabetes 64.3 (2015): 673-686.

[00:48:13] What to do example.

[00:48:53] C-peptide.

[00:50:06] Chewing food and GLP-1. Study: Li, Jie, et al. "Improvement in chewing activity reduces energy intake in one meal and modulates plasma gut hormone concentrations in obese and lean young Chinese men." The American journal of clinical nutrition 94.3 (2011): 709-716.

[00:50:39] Quercetin, supplements.

[00:51:54] Course: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Glucose Dysregulation.

[00:55:19] Reactive hypoglycemia.

[00:57:06] 1,000 True Fans.

[00:58:09] For more from Dr Walsh check out: drwalsh.com, metabolicfitnesspro.com.

[00:59:10] Podcast: WAYYYY Beyond Diet & Exercise with Dr. Bryan Walsh.

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The D-BHB Ketone Monoester Is Here https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Brianna.Stubbs.2017.09.mp3 This episode brought to you by Rock Lobster Cycles, beautiful bicycles handbuilt in Santa Cruz, California.

In our last interview, scientist and world champion rower Dr Brianna Stubbs had recently successfully defended her PhD in Biochemical Physiology and reached a juncture in her career. Ten months later, Brianna has retired from professional rowing but continues her passion for biochemistry with San Francisco based nootropics company HMVN where she is working to commercialise the D-BHB ketone monoester developed at Oxford University alongside Prof. Kieran Clarke.

The big news is the wait is over! After over a decade of research, the ester is finally here.

This interview is two rolled into one. In the first part, we talk about Brianna’s transition out of academia and professional sport and into the world of Silicon Valley startups. In the second part, Brianna talks about the benefits of the ketone ester and takes on some of Dr Tommy Wood’s challenging questions given to me by ahead of the interview but unseen by Brianna.

If you’re only interested in hearing about the ketone monoester, skip to the 24-minute mark.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Brianna Stubbs, PhD:

[00:01:23] Retirement from rowing.

[00:02:56] Podcast: Off Road Triathlon World Champion Lesley Paterson on FMT and Solving Mental Conundrums.

[00:03:19] App: Strava.

[00:04:17] The move to San Francisco.

[00:05:00] Professor Kieran Clarke, PhD, CEO of TdeltaS.

[00:05:24] HVMN.

[00:08:27] World Rowing Championships.

[00:09:40] Rodent and then human experiments.

[00:10:37] Finding purpose and resolving ambivalence.

[00:12:09] Journaling.

[00:12:55] Mentoring.

[00:14:42] Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall.

[00:15:08] YouTube: HVMN Enhancement Podcast: Ep. 46: Correcting Nutritional Deficiencies ft. Christopher Kelly.

[00:15:38] Tony Hsieh of Zappos.com.

[00:16:38] Body composition.

[00:17:39] BHRT (Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy). Podcast: The Critical Role of Oestradiol for Women’s Cognition with Dr. Ann Hathaway, MD.

[00:17:57] DXA scan.

[00:18:09] Intermittent fasting.

[00:19:22] We Fast Facebook Community.

[00:20:42] Put on 20lb, mostly muscle.

[00:24:51] Podcast: World Champion Rower and Ketone Monoester Researcher Brianna Stubbs.

[00:25:19] Dr. Richard Veech, Hans Krebs.

[00:26:52] Ketone metabolism.

[00:28:04] Study: Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:28:47] Case Report: Newport, Mary T., et al. "A new way to produce hyperketonemia: use of ketone ester in a case of Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's & Dementia 11.1 (2015): 99-103.

[00:29:20] FDA GRAS (generally recognized as safe).

[00:29:32] WADA.

[00:30:38] Who is the ester for?

[00:31:54] Article and Studies: Reference 1, 2 and 3.

[00:33:30] Glycogen sparing or impairing?

[00:35:57] WINGATE test.

[00:36:08] If you've got ketones, you don't break down as much protein? BCAA.

[00:36:32] Study: Vandoorne, Tijs, et al. "Intake of a Ketone Ester Drink during Recovery from Exercise Promotes mTORC1 Signaling but Not Glycogen Resynthesis in Human Muscle." Frontiers in physiology 8 (2017).

[00:37:27] Pro cycling.

[00:39:00] Study: Youm, Yun-Hee, et al. "The ketone metabolite [beta]-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease." Nature medicine 21.3 (2015): 263-269.

[00:40:05] Why is glucose required for an increase in exercise performance?

[00:41:12] Anaplaerosis. See Tommy’s letter published recently in the journal Strength and Conditioning.

[00:42:19] Should we stop using the salts?

[00:42:41] Appetite suppressing effects of ketones.

[00:43:02] D and L isomers.

[00:44:11] Dominic D'Agostino, PhD.

[00:45:14] Are diet and lifestyle still the most important factors?

[00:46:36] Caffeine, nitrates, beta-alanine.

[00:47:31] Ketone ester 30 min rowing performance.

[00:49:21] Podcast: SNR #195: Brendan Egan, PhD – Exogenous Ketone Supplementation.

[00:52:25] Study: Volek, Jeff S., et al. "Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners." Metabolism 65.3 (2016): 100-110.

[00:52:41] Intramuscular triglycerides.

[00:53:07] Ketones as signaling molecule.

[00:53:46] YouTube: HDAC inhibitors and Podcast: A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice with Megan Hall.

[00:54:27] Nicotinic acid receptor.

[00:55:11] Book: Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky.

[00:56:16] General anesthesia.

[00:57:11] Two papers, Kieran hyperglycemia and Veech (ask Tommy)

[00:59:02] Exogenous ketones lower blood glucose.

[00:59:46] Biden pancreatic islet study

[01:00:26] Insulin is anti-proteolytic.

[01:00:37] George Cahill paper

[01:03:03] Who's it for?

[01:03:12] Price.

[01:04:06] Intestinal Alk Phos. See Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:06:12] Product page at HVMN.

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cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Brianna.Stubbs.2017.09.mp3 Mon, 06 Nov 2017 06:11:48 GMT Christopher Kelly This episode brought to you by Rock Lobster Cycles, beautiful bicycles handbuilt in Santa Cruz, California.

In our last interview, scientist and world champion rower Dr Brianna Stubbs had recently successfully defended her PhD in Biochemical Physiology and reached a juncture in her career. Ten months later, Brianna has retired from professional rowing but continues her passion for biochemistry with San Francisco based nootropics company HMVN where she is working to commercialise the D-BHB ketone monoester developed at Oxford University alongside Prof. Kieran Clarke.

The big news is the wait is over! After over a decade of research, the ester is finally here.

This interview is two rolled into one. In the first part, we talk about Brianna’s transition out of academia and professional sport and into the world of Silicon Valley startups. In the second part, Brianna talks about the benefits of the ketone ester and takes on some of Dr Tommy Wood’s challenging questions given to me by ahead of the interview but unseen by Brianna.

If you’re only interested in hearing about the ketone monoester, skip to the 24-minute mark.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Brianna Stubbs, PhD:

[00:01:23] Retirement from rowing.

[00:02:56] Podcast: Off Road Triathlon World Champion Lesley Paterson on FMT and Solving Mental Conundrums.

[00:03:19] App: Strava.

[00:04:17] The move to San Francisco.

[00:05:00] Professor Kieran Clarke, PhD, CEO of TdeltaS.

[00:05:24] HVMN.

[00:08:27] World Rowing Championships.

[00:09:40] Rodent and then human experiments.

[00:10:37] Finding purpose and resolving ambivalence.

[00:12:09] Journaling.

[00:12:55] Mentoring.

[00:14:42] Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall.

[00:15:08] YouTube: HVMN Enhancement Podcast: Ep. 46: Correcting Nutritional Deficiencies ft. Christopher Kelly.

[00:15:38] Tony Hsieh of Zappos.com.

[00:16:38] Body composition.

[00:17:39] BHRT (Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy). Podcast: The Critical Role of Oestradiol for Women’s Cognition with Dr. Ann Hathaway, MD.

[00:17:57] DXA scan.

[00:18:09] Intermittent fasting.

[00:19:22] We Fast Facebook Community.

[00:20:42] Put on 20lb, mostly muscle.

[00:24:51] Podcast: World Champion Rower and Ketone Monoester Researcher Brianna Stubbs.

[00:25:19] Dr. Richard Veech, Hans Krebs.

[00:26:52] Ketone metabolism.

[00:28:04] Study: Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:28:47] Case Report: Newport, Mary T., et al. "A new way to produce hyperketonemia: use of ketone ester in a case of Alzheimer's disease." Alzheimer's & Dementia 11.1 (2015): 99-103.

[00:29:20] FDA GRAS (generally recognized as safe).

[00:29:32] WADA.

[00:30:38] Who is the ester for?

[00:31:54] Article and Studies: Reference 1, 2 and 3.

[00:33:30] Glycogen sparing or impairing?

[00:35:57] WINGATE test.

[00:36:08] If you've got ketones, you don't break down as much protein? BCAA.

[00:36:32] Study: Vandoorne, Tijs, et al. "Intake of a Ketone Ester Drink during Recovery from Exercise Promotes mTORC1 Signaling but Not Glycogen Resynthesis in Human Muscle." Frontiers in physiology 8 (2017).

[00:37:27] Pro cycling.

[00:39:00] Study: Youm, Yun-Hee, et al. "The ketone metabolite [beta]-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease." Nature medicine 21.3 (2015): 263-269.

[00:40:05] Why is glucose required for an increase in exercise performance?

[00:41:12] Anaplaerosis. See Tommy’s letter published recently in the journal Strength and Conditioning.

[00:42:19] Should we stop using the salts?

[00:42:41] Appetite suppressing effects of ketones.

[00:43:02] D and L isomers.

[00:44:11] Dominic D'Agostino, PhD.

[00:45:14] Are diet and lifestyle still the most important factors?

[00:46:36] Caffeine, nitrates, beta-alanine.

[00:47:31] Ketone ester 30 min rowing performance.

[00:49:21] Podcast: SNR #195: Brendan Egan, PhD – Exogenous Ketone Supplementation.

[00:52:25] Study: Volek, Jeff S., et al. "Metabolic characteristics of keto-adapted ultra-endurance runners." Metabolism 65.3 (2016): 100-110.

[00:52:41] Intramuscular triglycerides.

[00:53:07] Ketones as signaling molecule.

[00:53:46] YouTube: HDAC inhibitors and Podcast: A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice with Megan Hall.

[00:54:27] Nicotinic acid receptor.

[00:55:11] Book: Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky.

[00:56:16] General anesthesia.

[00:57:11] Two papers, Kieran hyperglycemia and Veech (ask Tommy)

[00:59:02] Exogenous ketones lower blood glucose.

[00:59:46] Biden pancreatic islet study

[01:00:26] Insulin is anti-proteolytic.

[01:00:37] George Cahill paper

[01:03:03] Who's it for?

[01:03:12] Price.

[01:04:06] Intestinal Alk Phos. See Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:06:12] Product page at HVMN.

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A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Megan.Roberts.on.2017-10-13.at.09.31.mp3 Our Scientific Director Megan Hall (née Roberts) recently had some of the work from her Master’s degree published in the journal Cell Metabolism, which is seriously impressive. The paper appeared on Science Daily, and generally caused a bit of a stir in the low carb community. As we have direct access to the horse’s mouth, I’ve asked Megan to join me in this episode of the podcast to summarise the findings and give some thoughts on how it might relate to human health.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Megan Hall:

[00:00:55] Mastermind Talks.

[00:01:47] The lead up to the study.

[00:02:17] Time-restricted feeding.

[00:02:38] Are they eating longer because of a less crappy diet?

[00:04:21] Calorie restriction was the focus of Megan's lab.

[00:05:27] Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jon Ramsey, PhD.

[00:06:13] Study design.

[00:07:36] High-fat diets in rodents.

[00:08:39] Two arms: longevity and healthspan.

[00:10:55] Grip strength in a rodent.

[00:11:40] Novel object test.

[00:12:55] fMRI for body composition using the EchoMRI.

[00:13:13] The results. Study: Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546.

[00:15:40] Valter Longo, PhD and USC Longevity Institute. Studies: Brandhorst, Sebastian, et al. "A periodic diet that mimics fasting promotes multi-system regeneration, enhanced cognitive performance, and healthspan." Cell metabolism 22.1 (2015): 86-99 and Wei, Min, et al. "Fasting-mimicking diet and markers/risk factors for aging, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease." Science translational medicine 9.377 (2017): eaai8700.

[00:16:27] Study: Sleiman, Sama F., et al. "Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate." Elife 5 (2016): e15092.

[00:17:34] Motor function and coordination.

[00:18:58] The importance of preserving type IIA muscle fibers. Podcast: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Dr Tommy Wood and The High-Performance Athlete with Drs Tommy Wood and Andy Galpin.

[00:19:18] Study: Zou, Xiaoting, et al. "Acetoacetate accelerates muscle regeneration and ameliorates muscular dystrophy in mice." Journal of Biological Chemistry291.5 (2016): 2181-2195.

[00:20:04] Exercise performance.

[00:21:13] Physiologic insulin resistance.

[00:22:06] Podcast: Real Food for Gestational Diabetes with Lily Nichols.

[00:24:21] Keto vs low-carb.

[00:27:05] Studies: β-Hydroxybutyrate: A Signaling Metabolite and Ketone bodies as signalling metabolites.

[00:27:49] YouTube: Histone deacetylation and inhibition.

[00:29:19] I mentioned the Khan Academy, but in the end Megan liked these videos on HDAC inhibitors and cancer and Histone deacetylation and inhibition (also mentions p53!).

[00:30:49] FOXO proteins.

[00:31:30] Lysine residues.

[00:31:48] Mn SOD.

[00:32:10] mTOR, Dr. Ron Rosedale.

[00:34:04] REDD1 protein.

[00:34:32] P53 protein, metformin.

[00:35:30] Less cancer in KD mice.

[00:36:00] Warburg Effect.

[00:36:21] Replicability.

[00:36:57] Study: Newman, John C., et al. "Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality and Improves Memory in Aging Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 547-557.

[00:38:28] Press coverage of the study, “Eat Fat, Live Longer” at Sciencedaily.com.

[00:41:01] Soybean oil in rodent diets.

[00:41:34] Sex-dependent differences.

[00:43:23] Takeaways.

[00:44:21] Dogma displacement inertia.

[00:45:19] Exogenous ketones. Study: Stubbs, Brianna Jane, et al. "On the metabolism of exogenous ketones in humans." Frontiers in Physiology 8 (2017): 848.

[00:46:34] What does this mean for humans?

[00:47:42] Weightloss.

[00:48:36] Micromanaging the details.

[00:50:33] Who are you and what are your goals -- Robb Wolf. Podcast: Wired to Eat with Robb Wolf.

[00:51:55] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights Series sign up.

[00:53:11] Megan's purpose.

[00:53:39] Book: Find Your Why: A Practical Guide for Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team by Simon Sinek and David Mead.

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cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Megan.Roberts.on.2017-10-13.at.09.31.mp3 Fri, 27 Oct 2017 07:10:56 GMT Christopher Kelly Our Scientific Director Megan Hall (née Roberts) recently had some of the work from her Master’s degree published in the journal Cell Metabolism, which is seriously impressive. The paper appeared on Science Daily, and generally caused a bit of a stir in the low carb community. As we have direct access to the horse’s mouth, I’ve asked Megan to join me in this episode of the podcast to summarise the findings and give some thoughts on how it might relate to human health.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Megan Hall:

[00:00:55] Mastermind Talks.

[00:01:47] The lead up to the study.

[00:02:17] Time-restricted feeding.

[00:02:38] Are they eating longer because of a less crappy diet?

[00:04:21] Calorie restriction was the focus of Megan's lab.

[00:05:27] Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jon Ramsey, PhD.

[00:06:13] Study design.

[00:07:36] High-fat diets in rodents.

[00:08:39] Two arms: longevity and healthspan.

[00:10:55] Grip strength in a rodent.

[00:11:40] Novel object test.

[00:12:55] fMRI for body composition using the EchoMRI.

[00:13:13] The results. Study: Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546.

[00:15:40] Valter Longo, PhD and USC Longevity Institute. Studies: Brandhorst, Sebastian, et al. "A periodic diet that mimics fasting promotes multi-system regeneration, enhanced cognitive performance, and healthspan." Cell metabolism 22.1 (2015): 86-99 and Wei, Min, et al. "Fasting-mimicking diet and markers/risk factors for aging, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease." Science translational medicine 9.377 (2017): eaai8700.

[00:16:27] Study: Sleiman, Sama F., et al. "Exercise promotes the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through the action of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate." Elife 5 (2016): e15092.

[00:17:34] Motor function and coordination.

[00:18:58] The importance of preserving type IIA muscle fibers. Podcast: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Dr Tommy Wood and The High-Performance Athlete with Drs Tommy Wood and Andy Galpin.

[00:19:18] Study: Zou, Xiaoting, et al. "Acetoacetate accelerates muscle regeneration and ameliorates muscular dystrophy in mice." Journal of Biological Chemistry291.5 (2016): 2181-2195.

[00:20:04] Exercise performance.

[00:21:13] Physiologic insulin resistance.

[00:22:06] Podcast: Real Food for Gestational Diabetes with Lily Nichols.

[00:24:21] Keto vs low-carb.

[00:27:05] Studies: β-Hydroxybutyrate: A Signaling Metabolite and Ketone bodies as signalling metabolites.

[00:27:49] YouTube: Histone deacetylation and inhibition.

[00:29:19] I mentioned the Khan Academy, but in the end Megan liked these videos on HDAC inhibitors and cancer and Histone deacetylation and inhibition (also mentions p53!).

[00:30:49] FOXO proteins.

[00:31:30] Lysine residues.

[00:31:48] Mn SOD.

[00:32:10] mTOR, Dr. Ron Rosedale.

[00:34:04] REDD1 protein.

[00:34:32] P53 protein, metformin.

[00:35:30] Less cancer in KD mice.

[00:36:00] Warburg Effect.

[00:36:21] Replicability.

[00:36:57] Study: Newman, John C., et al. "Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality and Improves Memory in Aging Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 547-557.

[00:38:28] Press coverage of the study, “Eat Fat, Live Longer” at Sciencedaily.com.

[00:41:01] Soybean oil in rodent diets.

[00:41:34] Sex-dependent differences.

[00:43:23] Takeaways.

[00:44:21] Dogma displacement inertia.

[00:45:19] Exogenous ketones. Study: Stubbs, Brianna Jane, et al. "On the metabolism of exogenous ketones in humans." Frontiers in Physiology 8 (2017): 848.

[00:46:34] What does this mean for humans?

[00:47:42] Weightloss.

[00:48:36] Micromanaging the details.

[00:50:33] Who are you and what are your goals -- Robb Wolf. Podcast: Wired to Eat with Robb Wolf.

[00:51:55] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights Series sign up.

[00:53:11] Megan's purpose.

[00:53:39] Book: Find Your Why: A Practical Guide for Discovering Purpose for You and Your Team by Simon Sinek and David Mead.

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Ketones, Insulin and the Physiology of Fat Cells https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Benjamin.Bikman.on.2017-10-04.at.08.03.mp3 Dr. Ben Bikman is an Associate Professor of Physiology & Developmental Biology at Brigham Young University. He has a PhD in Bioenergetics and did his postdoctoral work in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases such as obesity.

In this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, Ben talks about his recent tenureship and research on the metabolic effects of insulin and ketones on fat cells.

Also discussed are two schools of thought in obesity research and how both groups may be right about various aspects of weight loss.

As you might be able to tell, I struggled a bit to find a picture of Tommy in the lab to match Ben's. Props to Tommy for allowing me to use the pic on the left (taken in jest), I thought it too funny to go to waste.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ben Bikman:

[00:01:59] Dr Ben Bikman recently made tenure.

[00:02:46] The tenureship process.

[00:04:14] Presentation: Insulin vs. Ketones - The Battle for Brown Fat by Dr Ben Binkman.

[00:05:16] Podcast: Recap: Icelandic Health Symposium 2017 and Satchidananda Panda.

[00:06:20] The Pubmed warrior; Ivor Cumins aka the The Fat Emperor.

[00:07:16] Publishing a book.

[00:07:44] Dr Jeff Gerber and Dr Rod Tayler organizers of Low Carb Breckenridge.

[00:09:40] Removing the invisible barrier between the scientists and the public.

[00:12:36] American Heart Association.

[00:13:01] Study: Hall, Kevin D., et al. "Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men." The American journal of clinical nutrition 104.2 (2016): 324-333.

[00:14:33] Calorie type is more important.

[00:14:58] Study: Walsh, C. O., Ebbeling, C. B., Swain, J. F., Markowitz, R. L., Feldman, H. A., & Ludwig, D. S. (2013). Effects of diet composition on postprandial energy availability during weight loss maintenance. PloS one, 8(3), e58172.

[00:15:58] The Biggest Loser.

[00:16:58] The importance of protein.

[00:18:22] Protein increases glucagon.

[00:20:16] Just eat real food.

[00:20:48] Ben's research on adipocytes, studies not completed yet.

[00:22:20] White vs brown fat.

[00:22:50] Uncoupling to create heat.

[00:24:18] Fat mass also changed.

[00:24:49] Study: Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546.

[00:25:35] Study: Lim, Gareth E., et al. "14-3-3 [zeta] coordinates adipogenesis of visceral fat." Nature communications 6 (2015).

[00:27:15] Wasting away in T1D.

[00:27:35] Elliot Joslin of the Joslin Diabetes Center and Francis Benedict.

[00:28:55] Ketones can be insulinogenic.

[00:29:33] Study: Biden, Trevor J., and Keith W. Taylor. "Effects of ketone bodies on insulin release and islet-cell metabolism in the rat." Biochemical Journal 212.2 (1983): 371-377.

[00:30:12] Exogenous ketones and weight loss.

[00:30:59] Study: Holdsworth, David A., et al. "A ketone ester drink increases postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis in humans." Medicine and science in sports and exercise 49.9 (2017): 1789.

[00:33:16] Human clinical studies.

[00:37:26] Ben is not an advocate of chronic ketosis.

[00:39:17] Breakfast and lunch are easy to change.

[00:40:49] Study: (PURE) Dehghan, Mahshid, et al. "Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study." The Lancet(2017).

[00:43:43] Dr Ben Bikman on social media: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Benjamin.Bikman.on.2017-10-04.at.08.03.mp3 Sat, 21 Oct 2017 09:10:01 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr. Ben Bikman is an Associate Professor of Physiology & Developmental Biology at Brigham Young University. He has a PhD in Bioenergetics and did his postdoctoral work in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases such as obesity.

In this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, Ben talks about his recent tenureship and research on the metabolic effects of insulin and ketones on fat cells.

Also discussed are two schools of thought in obesity research and how both groups may be right about various aspects of weight loss.

As you might be able to tell, I struggled a bit to find a picture of Tommy in the lab to match Ben's. Props to Tommy for allowing me to use the pic on the left (taken in jest), I thought it too funny to go to waste.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ben Bikman:

[00:01:59] Dr Ben Bikman recently made tenure.

[00:02:46] The tenureship process.

[00:04:14] Presentation: Insulin vs. Ketones - The Battle for Brown Fat by Dr Ben Binkman.

[00:05:16] Podcast: Recap: Icelandic Health Symposium 2017 and Satchidananda Panda.

[00:06:20] The Pubmed warrior; Ivor Cumins aka the The Fat Emperor.

[00:07:16] Publishing a book.

[00:07:44] Dr Jeff Gerber and Dr Rod Tayler organizers of Low Carb Breckenridge.

[00:09:40] Removing the invisible barrier between the scientists and the public.

[00:12:36] American Heart Association.

[00:13:01] Study: Hall, Kevin D., et al. "Energy expenditure and body composition changes after an isocaloric ketogenic diet in overweight and obese men." The American journal of clinical nutrition 104.2 (2016): 324-333.

[00:14:33] Calorie type is more important.

[00:14:58] Study: Walsh, C. O., Ebbeling, C. B., Swain, J. F., Markowitz, R. L., Feldman, H. A., & Ludwig, D. S. (2013). Effects of diet composition on postprandial energy availability during weight loss maintenance. PloS one, 8(3), e58172.

[00:15:58] The Biggest Loser.

[00:16:58] The importance of protein.

[00:18:22] Protein increases glucagon.

[00:20:16] Just eat real food.

[00:20:48] Ben's research on adipocytes, studies not completed yet.

[00:22:20] White vs brown fat.

[00:22:50] Uncoupling to create heat.

[00:24:18] Fat mass also changed.

[00:24:49] Study: Roberts, Megan N., et al. "A Ketogenic Diet Extends Longevity and Healthspan in Adult Mice." Cell Metabolism 26.3 (2017): 539-546.

[00:25:35] Study: Lim, Gareth E., et al. "14-3-3 [zeta] coordinates adipogenesis of visceral fat." Nature communications 6 (2015).

[00:27:15] Wasting away in T1D.

[00:27:35] Elliot Joslin of the Joslin Diabetes Center and Francis Benedict.

[00:28:55] Ketones can be insulinogenic.

[00:29:33] Study: Biden, Trevor J., and Keith W. Taylor. "Effects of ketone bodies on insulin release and islet-cell metabolism in the rat." Biochemical Journal 212.2 (1983): 371-377.

[00:30:12] Exogenous ketones and weight loss.

[00:30:59] Study: Holdsworth, David A., et al. "A ketone ester drink increases postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis in humans." Medicine and science in sports and exercise 49.9 (2017): 1789.

[00:33:16] Human clinical studies.

[00:37:26] Ben is not an advocate of chronic ketosis.

[00:39:17] Breakfast and lunch are easy to change.

[00:40:49] Study: (PURE) Dehghan, Mahshid, et al. "Associations of fats and carbohydrate intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 18 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study." The Lancet(2017).

[00:43:43] Dr Ben Bikman on social media: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter.

]]>
no
The High-Performance Athlete with Drs Tommy Wood and Andy Galpin https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Andy.Galpin.on.2017-09-19.at.07.15.mp3 Andy is a tenured Professor in the Center for Sport Performance at California State University Fullerton, and Director of the Biochemistry and Molecular Exercise Physiology Laboratory. Having previously been a competitive football player, weightlifter, and martial artist, Andy now uses what he learns in his research to help amateur and elite or Olympic athletes in multiple sports, from UFC to the NFL.

Andy recently co-authored a book with Brian MacKenzie and Phil White called Unplugged. As the name suggests, a major theme in the book is avoiding the pitfalls of modern technology.

One theme of the book is the use of hormetic stressors - pushing your physiology with cold or fasting, for instance, to improve health and performance. In this interview, Andy talks about how he is using that in terms of recommendations for the general public, and in his elite athletes.

Our favourite Andy Galpin quote from this episode:

When you're optimising, you're not adapting

Here’s the outline of this interview with Andy Galpin:

[00:02:51] Molecular-level studies vs human clinic trials.

[00:04:26] Leg strength.

[00:05:42] Study: Bathgate, Katie & Bagley, James & Jo, Edward & NL, Segal & Brown, Lee & Coburn, Jared & CN, Gullick & Ruas, Cassio & Galpin, Andrew. (2016). Physiological Profile of Monozygous Twins with 35 Years of Differing Exercise Habits. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 30. S43-S44.

[00:07:38] Endurance 90% slow-twitch, untrained 50% fast-twitch.

[00:09:48] Podcast: The Joe Rogan Experience #996 with Dr. Andy Galpin.

[00:10:33] Intra-muscular triglycerides (IMTGs).

[00:11:41] Marbling.

[00:14:35] Specificity of training.

[00:18:32] Polarised training. Study: Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:19:30] Brian McKenzie, CrossFit Endurance -website coming soon.

[00:23:26] Body conditioning for long events.

[00:24:24] Book: Unplugged: Evolve from Technology to Upgrade Your Fitness, Performance, & Consciousness by Brian MacKenzie, Dr. Andy Galpin and Phil White.

[00:25:29] The misuse of technology in training.

[00:28:05] Technology makes no adjustment for context.

[00:31:07] Tim Ferriss.

[00:31:46] Collect the minimum amount of data possible.

[00:32:28] Use the least amount of technology possible.

[00:32:51] Tracking subjective measures.

[00:33:26] Study: Saw AE, Main LC, Gastin PB. Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016;50(5):281-291. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-094758.

[00:33:43] Shawn M. Arent, PhD.

[00:39:05] Hormetic stress. Podcast: Getting Stronger with Todd Becker.

[00:40:49] Mike Bledsoe at Barbell Shrugged, coffee.

[00:43:41] When you're optimising, you're not adapting.

[00:44:28] Coach Cal Dietz, Minnesota Golden Gophers.

[00:44:45] Michael Phelps swim coach, Bob Bowman.

[00:45:24] Benjamin Levine, MD.

[00:47:29] Low-carb diets for performance.

[00:49:19] The whole point is to overreach.

[00:50:56] Podcast: Wired to Eat with Robb Wolf where he discusses the 7-day carb test.

[00:51:40] Book: Wired to Eat: Turn Off Cravings, Rewire Your Appetite for Weight Loss, and Determine the Foods That Work for You by Robb Wolf.

[00:54:05] Nothing is forever.

[00:54:36] Book: Unplugged: Evolve from Technology to Upgrade Your Fitness, Performance, & Consciousness by Brian MacKenzie, Dr. Andy Galpin and Phil White.

[00:54:50] Andy Galpin on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube.

[00:55:06] Podcast: The Body of Knowledge hosted by Andy Galpin, PhD and Kenny Kane.

[00:55:32] andygalpin.com and Dr. Andy Galpin on Patreon.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Andy.Galpin.on.2017-09-19.at.07.15.mp3 Fri, 13 Oct 2017 13:10:34 GMT Christopher Kelly Andy is a tenured Professor in the Center for Sport Performance at California State University Fullerton, and Director of the Biochemistry and Molecular Exercise Physiology Laboratory. Having previously been a competitive football player, weightlifter, and martial artist, Andy now uses what he learns in his research to help amateur and elite or Olympic athletes in multiple sports, from UFC to the NFL.

Andy recently co-authored a book with Brian MacKenzie and Phil White called Unplugged. As the name suggests, a major theme in the book is avoiding the pitfalls of modern technology.

One theme of the book is the use of hormetic stressors - pushing your physiology with cold or fasting, for instance, to improve health and performance. In this interview, Andy talks about how he is using that in terms of recommendations for the general public, and in his elite athletes.

Our favourite Andy Galpin quote from this episode:

When you're optimising, you're not adapting

Here’s the outline of this interview with Andy Galpin:

[00:02:51] Molecular-level studies vs human clinic trials.

[00:04:26] Leg strength.

[00:05:42] Study: Bathgate, Katie & Bagley, James & Jo, Edward & NL, Segal & Brown, Lee & Coburn, Jared & CN, Gullick & Ruas, Cassio & Galpin, Andrew. (2016). Physiological Profile of Monozygous Twins with 35 Years of Differing Exercise Habits. The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 30. S43-S44.

[00:07:38] Endurance 90% slow-twitch, untrained 50% fast-twitch.

[00:09:48] Podcast: The Joe Rogan Experience #996 with Dr. Andy Galpin.

[00:10:33] Intra-muscular triglycerides (IMTGs).

[00:11:41] Marbling.

[00:14:35] Specificity of training.

[00:18:32] Polarised training. Study: Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:19:30] Brian McKenzie, CrossFit Endurance -website coming soon.

[00:23:26] Body conditioning for long events.

[00:24:24] Book: Unplugged: Evolve from Technology to Upgrade Your Fitness, Performance, & Consciousness by Brian MacKenzie, Dr. Andy Galpin and Phil White.

[00:25:29] The misuse of technology in training.

[00:28:05] Technology makes no adjustment for context.

[00:31:07] Tim Ferriss.

[00:31:46] Collect the minimum amount of data possible.

[00:32:28] Use the least amount of technology possible.

[00:32:51] Tracking subjective measures.

[00:33:26] Study: Saw AE, Main LC, Gastin PB. Monitoring the athlete training response: subjective self-reported measures trump commonly used objective measures: a systematic review. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016;50(5):281-291. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-094758.

[00:33:43] Shawn M. Arent, PhD.

[00:39:05] Hormetic stress. Podcast: Getting Stronger with Todd Becker.

[00:40:49] Mike Bledsoe at Barbell Shrugged, coffee.

[00:43:41] When you're optimising, you're not adapting.

[00:44:28] Coach Cal Dietz, Minnesota Golden Gophers.

[00:44:45] Michael Phelps swim coach, Bob Bowman.

[00:45:24] Benjamin Levine, MD.

[00:47:29] Low-carb diets for performance.

[00:49:19] The whole point is to overreach.

[00:50:56] Podcast: Wired to Eat with Robb Wolf where he discusses the 7-day carb test.

[00:51:40] Book: Wired to Eat: Turn Off Cravings, Rewire Your Appetite for Weight Loss, and Determine the Foods That Work for You by Robb Wolf.

[00:54:05] Nothing is forever.

[00:54:36] Book: Unplugged: Evolve from Technology to Upgrade Your Fitness, Performance, & Consciousness by Brian MacKenzie, Dr. Andy Galpin and Phil White.

[00:54:50] Andy Galpin on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube.

[00:55:06] Podcast: The Body of Knowledge hosted by Andy Galpin, PhD and Kenny Kane.

[00:55:32] andygalpin.com and Dr. Andy Galpin on Patreon.

]]>
clean
How to Fuel for Your Sport (with Obstacle Course Racing as an Example) https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/ryan-tommy-ocr-nutrition-09-2017.mp3 In this special episode, NBT client Ryan Baxter takes over the mic to ask Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, some excellent questions around fuelling for Obstacle Course Racing (OCR). Whilst Tommy’s answers are somewhat specific to OCR, all athlete may find some helpful tips here.

Below are the questions that Ryan asked, and a summary of Tommy’s response.

Q: Diet can be like politics or religion, how do you effectively communicate your ideas about how athletes should fuel?

  • Be honest about the fact that there is more than one way to skin the cat
  • Start with real food - eliminations and diet subtypes are secondary
  • It’s OK to supplement if needed

Q: What is the most common problem you see when it comes to nutrition and athletes?

  • Undereating and underfuelling
  • Worrying too much about the minutiae
  • Thinking they can eat whatever they like because they exercise
  • Focusing too much on supplements without wanting to get the basics right
  • You need to figure out if you’re somebody that should worry *more* or less about their nutrition
    • Most of the people I work with often need to worry less
      • Over-restriction
    • Most “average” people need to worry more

Q: As far as day to day nutrition what do you think that should look like? Any specific macro recommendations?

  • This assumes no goal for changes in body composition
  • Eat 120-160g of protein per day, in 3-4 meals
  • For OCR athletes, I’d eat at least 1g/lb carbohydrate per day
  • Depends on intensity and can be cycled by day
  • The rest should come from fat, from whole food sources

Q: Chris Masterjohn just posted two videos [1, 2] on fueling athletic performance with carbs vs fats.  My overall interpretation of his analysis was that he feels that if you are doing intense exercise you need to be fueling with carbs.  What are your thoughts on the carbs vs fats debate.

  • Masterjohn has nicely presented the evidence to answer a question that should be obvious but sadly has generated a lot of debate.
  • Simplistically, you need to right fuel for the given exercise or intensity, and if you want to be regularly performing at glycolytic activities, you should be eating carbohydrates.
  • You can still do glycolytic work when restricting carbohydrates, and it may help to mitigate the downregulation of glycolytic pathways, but your absolute performance will probably drop.
  • If you’re restricting carbohydrates, *why* are you doing it?
    • Metabolic health?
      • If so, focus on that rather than performance.
    • “Fat adaptation”?
    • Can be achieved whilst also eating carbohydrates!
    • Fat oxidation rates increase with VO2Max.

Q: Our team is very diverse both in age range and fitness.  We have people who are in their teens and up and we have people who are beginners to those who race in the elite class.  Do you have recommendations about how to someone might go about finding the right nutrition for themselves?

  • An appropriate (and good) multivitamin is usually a good idea
  • Start with the rough recommendations above
  • Older people (40-50+) may need more protein
  • If still hungry, eat more!
  • If poor recovery, or weight loss despite not feeling hungry
  • Eat more carbohydrates
  • Increase calorie density of foods
  • If regular GI symptoms (diarrhoea, bloating etc), consider a period of elimination of the main potential culprits:
    • Grains, dairy, soy, eggs
    • FODMAPs
    • If this is beneficial for you - do more digging!

Q: We have some vegetarians on the team, would you suggest anything specific for them?

  • Don’t fall into the typical vegetarian traps
    • Not eating vegetables
    • Not eating fish (if not vegan)
    • Eating “faux” meat
    • Making bread and cheese dietary staples
  • Don’t usually have as much of a problem eating enough carbohydrate
  • Make sure you get enough protein (may need to increase intake to compensate for lower essential amino acid intake)
    • Controversial
    • May only be necessary if trying to maximise muscle mass

Q: Do you have any supplements that you would recommend every athlete take or is supplementation an individual recommendation?

  • Creatine
  • Vitamin D (if levels are low)
  • Citrulline and beta-alanine for repeated HIIT/Sprint/higher-rep weight training performance
  • Caffeine and nitrates (beetroot shots?) restricted the rest of the time and then used as an ergogenic aid

Q: Everyone always focuses on macronutrients when it comes it nutrition, but what about micronutrients?  Should we focus on them as well?  Can you talk about how they might affect your athletic performance?

  • Micronutrients are essential for all the basic synthetic and enzymatic functions in the body.
  • B6 for red blood cell production
  • Multiple B vitamins for various parts of energy production
  • Copper for proteins involved in iron absorption
  • Copper, zinc, and selenium for enzymes involved in handling oxidative stress
    • Zinc inhibits copper uptake
    • Many athletes both zinc *and* copper deficient
  • Selenium and iodine for thyroid function
  • Chris Masterjohn series

Q: I think every athlete knows about the importance of staying hydrated, but do you have any recommendations when it comes to hydrating during training or racing?  Should we be drinking a specific amount on a set schedule or should we just be mindful of how thirsty we are?

  • All the best evidence says you should just drink to thirst.
  • Tim Noakes “waterlogged” - documents the adverse effects of hyponatraemia in marathon runners and US Army when trying to stay “hyper hydrated”.
  • Where it has been studied, the people that perform the fastest at longer distances (IRONMAN triathlon or ultramarathons) tend to lose the most amount of bodyweight (i.e. are the most dehydrated).
    • Maybe genetic or involve other factors, but suggests dehydration is not the limiting component.

Q: OCR is a unique sport that combines lots of different aspects of physical fitness, so you think there are special fueling requirements for OCR athletes?

  • OCR typifies the need for metabolic flexibility - the ability to utilise all substrates at the right time, and switch between them.
  • Overtly restricting one macronutrient is unlikely to be beneficial
  • Cycle training intensities/modalities and fuel appropriately to get the best of all pathways.

Q: We have a coach who likes to push us pretty hard over the course of a 2hr class.  As an example, his warmup was a burpee ladder which essentially amounted us doing 15 minutes of burpees. And that is the warmup, how should we fuel for training sessions like this like this? Should we fuel beforehand/after/both?

  • I don’t think most people need intra-workout nutrition for this kind of session.
  • Unless struggling to maintain weight or want to gain muscle mass
    • Consider small amount of carbs and amino acids (as during a race)
  • Get a real food meal in as soon as feasible and comfortable
    • Can use a shake if you need more calories or protein or will be a long time before you can eat.
      • Not essential
      • Liquid calories not recommended unless failing to get enough from food.

Q: OCR races can vary greatly in distance, there are some that are 5k in distance all the way up to ultra-endurance races that last 24 hours. Of course, we are doing a lot more than just run during these races. When should we start concerning ourselves with intra-race nutrition? What would you suggest?

  • Probably don’t need intra-race nutrition unless going over 2-3 hours
  • Greater dependence on fat-burning/aerobic pathways at that distance
  • Combination of slow-digesting carbohydrate and some amino acids
    • UCAN, PHAT FIBRE, oats, sweet potato powder
    • MAP, BCAAs, protein powders
  • Fats for longer efforts if tolerated
  • Can be real-food based
    • Nuts (macadamias are popular) and seeds (i.e. chia)
    • Pemmican
  • NAC or glutathione for much longer efforts (i.e. 24h races)

Q: After a tough training session or race, we all want to recover as fast as possible to get back to training or racing.  Rest is important as is mobility etc, but is there anything from a nutrition perspective we can do to recover faster?

  • Depends on how soon you want to/need to recover
    • Antioxidants
    • Cold baths
  • Don’t eat crap food and minimise the post-race beers
  • Eat enough protein
  • If you tend to be nauseated or get GI symptoms after races, consider not eating for 2-4 hours afterwards to give the gut a break.    
  • If “fat adapted”, your body should be better able to handle this

Q Are there signs or symptoms that we might not be fueling properly? What do you see in practice when athletes are not fueling correctly?

  • Poor sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Slow recovery and soreness
  • Low libido

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Baxter:

[00:01:51] Get this kid some carbs!

[00:02:13] The Loft private Facebook group.

[00:06:10] FDN: Functional Diagnostic Nutrition training.

[00:07:49] Behaviour change. Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall, PhD.

[00:10:19] Testing currently utilized by Nourish Balance Thrive.

[00:11:37] Insulin. Podcast: Poor Misunderstood Insulin with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[00:13:03] Mindfullness. Podcast: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster with Dr. Ellen Langer, PhD.

[00:14:29] Nutrition recommendations for OCR.

[00:15:58] 120 - 160 g PRO, 1g CHO per lb of bodyweight? FAT?

[00:19:28] Net vs total CHO, fibre.

[00:20:30] YouTube: Carbs and Sports Performance: The Principles and Carbs and Sports Performance: The Evidence with Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:25:31] Podcast: Metabolic Flexibility with Chris Kelly.

[00:33:47] Pre/during/post training nutrition.

[00:35:25] Dr Tommy Wood's Nutrient-Delivery Smoothie.

[00:35:42] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:37:56] Nutrition for Spartan Beast and Ultra Beast events (~6 hours).

[00:39:47] UCAN and Phat Fibre.

[00:39:57] Catabolic Blocker.

[00:41:04] Pemmican.

[00:41:18] 100-200 kCal per hour.

[00:41:38] NAC.

[00:42:49] Podcast: Professor Tim Noakes: True Hydration and the Power of Low-Carb, High-Fat Diets.

[00:44:01] Justin's nut butters.

[00:44:28] Pro Bar Mixed Berry.

[00:45:00] Primal Kitchen’s bars and Ben Greenfield’s Nature Bite bars.

[00:45:48] Supplements.

[00:46:13] Creatine.

[00:46:29] Vitamin D (test 25-OH-D).

[00:46:59] Citrulline and Beta-Alanine: Why and How You Should Supplement with Creatine and Beta-Alanine.

[00:47:12] Caffeine.

[00:47:26] Nitrates, e.g. beet shots.

[00:49:10] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/ryan-tommy-ocr-nutrition-09-2017.mp3 Fri, 06 Oct 2017 06:10:19 GMT Christopher Kelly In this special episode, NBT client Ryan Baxter takes over the mic to ask Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, some excellent questions around fuelling for Obstacle Course Racing (OCR). Whilst Tommy’s answers are somewhat specific to OCR, all athlete may find some helpful tips here.

Below are the questions that Ryan asked, and a summary of Tommy’s response.

Q: Diet can be like politics or religion, how do you effectively communicate your ideas about how athletes should fuel?

  • Be honest about the fact that there is more than one way to skin the cat
  • Start with real food - eliminations and diet subtypes are secondary
  • It’s OK to supplement if needed

Q: What is the most common problem you see when it comes to nutrition and athletes?

  • Undereating and underfuelling
  • Worrying too much about the minutiae
  • Thinking they can eat whatever they like because they exercise
  • Focusing too much on supplements without wanting to get the basics right
  • You need to figure out if you’re somebody that should worry *more* or less about their nutrition
    • Most of the people I work with often need to worry less
      • Over-restriction
    • Most “average” people need to worry more

Q: As far as day to day nutrition what do you think that should look like? Any specific macro recommendations?

  • This assumes no goal for changes in body composition
  • Eat 120-160g of protein per day, in 3-4 meals
  • For OCR athletes, I’d eat at least 1g/lb carbohydrate per day
  • Depends on intensity and can be cycled by day
  • The rest should come from fat, from whole food sources

Q: Chris Masterjohn just posted two videos [1, 2] on fueling athletic performance with carbs vs fats.  My overall interpretation of his analysis was that he feels that if you are doing intense exercise you need to be fueling with carbs.  What are your thoughts on the carbs vs fats debate.

  • Masterjohn has nicely presented the evidence to answer a question that should be obvious but sadly has generated a lot of debate.
  • Simplistically, you need to right fuel for the given exercise or intensity, and if you want to be regularly performing at glycolytic activities, you should be eating carbohydrates.
  • You can still do glycolytic work when restricting carbohydrates, and it may help to mitigate the downregulation of glycolytic pathways, but your absolute performance will probably drop.
  • If you’re restricting carbohydrates, *why* are you doing it?
    • Metabolic health?
      • If so, focus on that rather than performance.
    • “Fat adaptation”?
    • Can be achieved whilst also eating carbohydrates!
    • Fat oxidation rates increase with VO2Max.

Q: Our team is very diverse both in age range and fitness.  We have people who are in their teens and up and we have people who are beginners to those who race in the elite class.  Do you have recommendations about how to someone might go about finding the right nutrition for themselves?

  • An appropriate (and good) multivitamin is usually a good idea
  • Start with the rough recommendations above
  • Older people (40-50+) may need more protein
  • If still hungry, eat more!
  • If poor recovery, or weight loss despite not feeling hungry
  • Eat more carbohydrates
  • Increase calorie density of foods
  • If regular GI symptoms (diarrhoea, bloating etc), consider a period of elimination of the main potential culprits:
    • Grains, dairy, soy, eggs
    • FODMAPs
    • If this is beneficial for you - do more digging!

Q: We have some vegetarians on the team, would you suggest anything specific for them?

  • Don’t fall into the typical vegetarian traps
    • Not eating vegetables
    • Not eating fish (if not vegan)
    • Eating “faux” meat
    • Making bread and cheese dietary staples
  • Don’t usually have as much of a problem eating enough carbohydrate
  • Make sure you get enough protein (may need to increase intake to compensate for lower essential amino acid intake)
    • Controversial
    • May only be necessary if trying to maximise muscle mass

Q: Do you have any supplements that you would recommend every athlete take or is supplementation an individual recommendation?

  • Creatine
  • Vitamin D (if levels are low)
  • Citrulline and beta-alanine for repeated HIIT/Sprint/higher-rep weight training performance
  • Caffeine and nitrates (beetroot shots?) restricted the rest of the time and then used as an ergogenic aid

Q: Everyone always focuses on macronutrients when it comes it nutrition, but what about micronutrients?  Should we focus on them as well?  Can you talk about how they might affect your athletic performance?

  • Micronutrients are essential for all the basic synthetic and enzymatic functions in the body.
  • B6 for red blood cell production
  • Multiple B vitamins for various parts of energy production
  • Copper for proteins involved in iron absorption
  • Copper, zinc, and selenium for enzymes involved in handling oxidative stress
    • Zinc inhibits copper uptake
    • Many athletes both zinc *and* copper deficient
  • Selenium and iodine for thyroid function
  • Chris Masterjohn series

Q: I think every athlete knows about the importance of staying hydrated, but do you have any recommendations when it comes to hydrating during training or racing?  Should we be drinking a specific amount on a set schedule or should we just be mindful of how thirsty we are?

  • All the best evidence says you should just drink to thirst.
  • Tim Noakes “waterlogged” - documents the adverse effects of hyponatraemia in marathon runners and US Army when trying to stay “hyper hydrated”.
  • Where it has been studied, the people that perform the fastest at longer distances (IRONMAN triathlon or ultramarathons) tend to lose the most amount of bodyweight (i.e. are the most dehydrated).
    • Maybe genetic or involve other factors, but suggests dehydration is not the limiting component.

Q: OCR is a unique sport that combines lots of different aspects of physical fitness, so you think there are special fueling requirements for OCR athletes?

  • OCR typifies the need for metabolic flexibility - the ability to utilise all substrates at the right time, and switch between them.
  • Overtly restricting one macronutrient is unlikely to be beneficial
  • Cycle training intensities/modalities and fuel appropriately to get the best of all pathways.

Q: We have a coach who likes to push us pretty hard over the course of a 2hr class.  As an example, his warmup was a burpee ladder which essentially amounted us doing 15 minutes of burpees. And that is the warmup, how should we fuel for training sessions like this like this? Should we fuel beforehand/after/both?

  • I don’t think most people need intra-workout nutrition for this kind of session.
  • Unless struggling to maintain weight or want to gain muscle mass
    • Consider small amount of carbs and amino acids (as during a race)
  • Get a real food meal in as soon as feasible and comfortable
    • Can use a shake if you need more calories or protein or will be a long time before you can eat.
      • Not essential
      • Liquid calories not recommended unless failing to get enough from food.

Q: OCR races can vary greatly in distance, there are some that are 5k in distance all the way up to ultra-endurance races that last 24 hours. Of course, we are doing a lot more than just run during these races. When should we start concerning ourselves with intra-race nutrition? What would you suggest?

  • Probably don’t need intra-race nutrition unless going over 2-3 hours
  • Greater dependence on fat-burning/aerobic pathways at that distance
  • Combination of slow-digesting carbohydrate and some amino acids
    • UCAN, PHAT FIBRE, oats, sweet potato powder
    • MAP, BCAAs, protein powders
  • Fats for longer efforts if tolerated
  • Can be real-food based
    • Nuts (macadamias are popular) and seeds (i.e. chia)
    • Pemmican
  • NAC or glutathione for much longer efforts (i.e. 24h races)

Q: After a tough training session or race, we all want to recover as fast as possible to get back to training or racing.  Rest is important as is mobility etc, but is there anything from a nutrition perspective we can do to recover faster?

  • Depends on how soon you want to/need to recover
    • Antioxidants
    • Cold baths
  • Don’t eat crap food and minimise the post-race beers
  • Eat enough protein
  • If you tend to be nauseated or get GI symptoms after races, consider not eating for 2-4 hours afterwards to give the gut a break.    
  • If “fat adapted”, your body should be better able to handle this

Q Are there signs or symptoms that we might not be fueling properly? What do you see in practice when athletes are not fueling correctly?

  • Poor sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Slow recovery and soreness
  • Low libido

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Baxter:

[00:01:51] Get this kid some carbs!

[00:02:13] The Loft private Facebook group.

[00:06:10] FDN: Functional Diagnostic Nutrition training.

[00:07:49] Behaviour change. Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall, PhD.

[00:10:19] Testing currently utilized by Nourish Balance Thrive.

[00:11:37] Insulin. Podcast: Poor Misunderstood Insulin with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[00:13:03] Mindfullness. Podcast: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster with Dr. Ellen Langer, PhD.

[00:14:29] Nutrition recommendations for OCR.

[00:15:58] 120 - 160 g PRO, 1g CHO per lb of bodyweight? FAT?

[00:19:28] Net vs total CHO, fibre.

[00:20:30] YouTube: Carbs and Sports Performance: The Principles and Carbs and Sports Performance: The Evidence with Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:25:31] Podcast: Metabolic Flexibility with Chris Kelly.

[00:33:47] Pre/during/post training nutrition.

[00:35:25] Dr Tommy Wood's Nutrient-Delivery Smoothie.

[00:35:42] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:37:56] Nutrition for Spartan Beast and Ultra Beast events (~6 hours).

[00:39:47] UCAN and Phat Fibre.

[00:39:57] Catabolic Blocker.

[00:41:04] Pemmican.

[00:41:18] 100-200 kCal per hour.

[00:41:38] NAC.

[00:42:49] Podcast: Professor Tim Noakes: True Hydration and the Power of Low-Carb, High-Fat Diets.

[00:44:01] Justin's nut butters.

[00:44:28] Pro Bar Mixed Berry.

[00:45:00] Primal Kitchen’s bars and Ben Greenfield’s Nature Bite bars.

[00:45:48] Supplements.

[00:46:13] Creatine.

[00:46:29] Vitamin D (test 25-OH-D).

[00:46:59] Citrulline and Beta-Alanine: Why and How You Should Supplement with Creatine and Beta-Alanine.

[00:47:12] Caffeine.

[00:47:26] Nitrates, e.g. beet shots.

[00:49:10] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

]]>
clean
Recap: Icelandic Health Symposium 2017 https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Iceland.2017.09.10.mp3 This interview with Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD was recorded in person, September 2017 the day after the Icelandic Health Symposium conference on longevity. The conference speakers were Rangan Chatterjee, Lilja Kjalarsdóttir, Satchidananda Panda, Ben Greenfield, Bryan Walsh, Doug McGuff, and Diana Rogers.

You could listen to this podcast for a recap and commentary on the conference and the practitioner workshop that took place the day after the presentations.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tommy Wood:

[00:00:44] Gudmundur Johannsson at IHS.

[00:01:03] Icelandic Health Symposium 2016. Podcast.

[00:01:33] Ben Greenfield Fitness.

[00:01:43] Podcasts: How to Run Efficiently with Drs Cucuzzella & Wood, How to Fix Autoimmunity in the over 50s with Dr Deborah Gordon and Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:04:04] Dr Doug McGuff.

[00:04:21] YouTube Channel: Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:04:47] Dr Rangan Chatterjee.

[00:05:21] The Bredesen Protocol. Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:06:33] Book: The Four Pillar Plan: How to Relax, Eat, Move and Sleep Your Way to a Longer, Healthier Life by Rangan Chatterjee.

[00:10:30] BBC One Series: Doctor in the House.

[00:10:57] Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall, PhD.

[00:11:25] Lilja Kjalarsdóttir.

[00:13:37] Podcast: Metabolic Flexibility with Christopher Kelly.

[00:16:11] Carnitine.

[00:18:30] Keto-mojo meter.

[00:19:12] Protein acetylation.

[00:20:04] Inhibiting HDACs (Histone Deacetylase).

[00:21:16] Bone health.

[00:22:02] The importance of strength training.

[00:24:04] Study: Schnell S, Friedman SM, Mendelson DA, Bingham KW, Kates SL. The 1-Year Mortality of Patients Treated in a Hip Fracture Program for Elders. Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation. 2010;1(1):6-14. doi:10.1177/2151458510378105.

[00:25:31] Doug's belt exercises.

[00:29:08] Satchinananda Panda.

[00:31:54] Satchinananda Panda’s list of publications.

[00:35:06] Podcast: National Cyclocross Champion Katie Compton on Ketosis and MTHFR.

[00:35:19] App: myCircadianClock by Satchidananda Panda.

[00:35:54] App: myLuxRecorder by Satchidananda Panda.

[00:36:58] Seasonal Affective Disorder.

[00:37:36] Caloric restriction or TRE?

[00:38:53] Changing building codes.

[00:40:04] Sunglassesswharehouse.com (looks like their blue blockers are discontinued).

[00:40:49] Ben Greenfield is agnostic on diet.

[00:45:32] Podcast: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:46:34] The science of thought-driven physiology.

[00:46:47] Study: Park, Chanmo, et al. "Blood sugar level follows perceived time rather than actual time in people with type 2 diabetes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016): 201603444.

[00:47:04] Study: Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. 2007. Mind-set matters: Exercise and the placebo effect. Psychological Science 18, no. 2: 165-171.

[00:47:26] Study: Berga, Sarah L., et al. "Recovery of ovarian activity in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea who were treated with cognitive behavior therapy." Fertility and sterility 80.4 (2003): 976-981.

[00:48:18] Study: Levy, B., & Langer, E. (1994). Aging free from negative stereotypes: Successful memory in China among the American deaf. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66(6), 989-997.

[00:49:07] Ken Ford at IHMC.

[00:50:57] What is health?

[00:52:36] Hedonism vs Eudaimonia.

[00:55:28] Tommy's purpose: to make as many people as healthy as possible.

[00:56:42] My purpose: solving problems.

[00:58:01] Hormetea.

[00:59:42] Newsletter: Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[01:02:30] Blood chemistry.

[01:05:11] Blood glucose course by Dr Bryan Walsh.

[01:05:38] Podcast: Is the Paleo Diet Sustainable with Diana Rodgers.

[01:07:08] Lab-grown meat.

[01:10:36] Philip Lymbery, CEO Compassion in World Farming.

[01:11:15] Guy the Gorilla.

[01:12:10] Podcast: Episode 47: Dr. Tommy Wood Talks About Neonatal Brain Injuries and Optimizing Human Performance. Studies regarding calorie restriction in monkeys: 1, 2.

[01:15:04] Event organisation: support@nourishbalancethrive.com

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Iceland.2017.09.10.mp3 Sat, 30 Sep 2017 09:09:03 GMT Christopher Kelly This interview with Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD was recorded in person, September 2017 the day after the Icelandic Health Symposium conference on longevity. The conference speakers were Rangan Chatterjee, Lilja Kjalarsdóttir, Satchidananda Panda, Ben Greenfield, Bryan Walsh, Doug McGuff, and Diana Rogers.

You could listen to this podcast for a recap and commentary on the conference and the practitioner workshop that took place the day after the presentations.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tommy Wood:

[00:00:44] Gudmundur Johannsson at IHS.

[00:01:03] Icelandic Health Symposium 2016. Podcast.

[00:01:33] Ben Greenfield Fitness.

[00:01:43] Podcasts: How to Run Efficiently with Drs Cucuzzella & Wood, How to Fix Autoimmunity in the over 50s with Dr Deborah Gordon and Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:04:04] Dr Doug McGuff.

[00:04:21] YouTube Channel: Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:04:47] Dr Rangan Chatterjee.

[00:05:21] The Bredesen Protocol. Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:06:33] Book: The Four Pillar Plan: How to Relax, Eat, Move and Sleep Your Way to a Longer, Healthier Life by Rangan Chatterjee.

[00:10:30] BBC One Series: Doctor in the House.

[00:10:57] Podcast: How to Create Behaviour Change with Simon Marshall, PhD.

[00:11:25] Lilja Kjalarsdóttir.

[00:13:37] Podcast: Metabolic Flexibility with Christopher Kelly.

[00:16:11] Carnitine.

[00:18:30] Keto-mojo meter.

[00:19:12] Protein acetylation.

[00:20:04] Inhibiting HDACs (Histone Deacetylase).

[00:21:16] Bone health.

[00:22:02] The importance of strength training.

[00:24:04] Study: Schnell S, Friedman SM, Mendelson DA, Bingham KW, Kates SL. The 1-Year Mortality of Patients Treated in a Hip Fracture Program for Elders. Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation. 2010;1(1):6-14. doi:10.1177/2151458510378105.

[00:25:31] Doug's belt exercises.

[00:29:08] Satchinananda Panda.

[00:31:54] Satchinananda Panda’s list of publications.

[00:35:06] Podcast: National Cyclocross Champion Katie Compton on Ketosis and MTHFR.

[00:35:19] App: myCircadianClock by Satchidananda Panda.

[00:35:54] App: myLuxRecorder by Satchidananda Panda.

[00:36:58] Seasonal Affective Disorder.

[00:37:36] Caloric restriction or TRE?

[00:38:53] Changing building codes.

[00:40:04] Sunglassesswharehouse.com (looks like their blue blockers are discontinued).

[00:40:49] Ben Greenfield is agnostic on diet.

[00:45:32] Podcast: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:46:34] The science of thought-driven physiology.

[00:46:47] Study: Park, Chanmo, et al. "Blood sugar level follows perceived time rather than actual time in people with type 2 diabetes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016): 201603444.

[00:47:04] Study: Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. 2007. Mind-set matters: Exercise and the placebo effect. Psychological Science 18, no. 2: 165-171.

[00:47:26] Study: Berga, Sarah L., et al. "Recovery of ovarian activity in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea who were treated with cognitive behavior therapy." Fertility and sterility 80.4 (2003): 976-981.

[00:48:18] Study: Levy, B., & Langer, E. (1994). Aging free from negative stereotypes: Successful memory in China among the American deaf. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 66(6), 989-997.

[00:49:07] Ken Ford at IHMC.

[00:50:57] What is health?

[00:52:36] Hedonism vs Eudaimonia.

[00:55:28] Tommy's purpose: to make as many people as healthy as possible.

[00:56:42] My purpose: solving problems.

[00:58:01] Hormetea.

[00:59:42] Newsletter: Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[01:02:30] Blood chemistry.

[01:05:11] Blood glucose course by Dr Bryan Walsh.

[01:05:38] Podcast: Is the Paleo Diet Sustainable with Diana Rodgers.

[01:07:08] Lab-grown meat.

[01:10:36] Philip Lymbery, CEO Compassion in World Farming.

[01:11:15] Guy the Gorilla.

[01:12:10] Podcast: Episode 47: Dr. Tommy Wood Talks About Neonatal Brain Injuries and Optimizing Human Performance. Studies regarding calorie restriction in monkeys: 1, 2.

[01:15:04] Event organisation: support@nourishbalancethrive.com

]]>
yes
How to Create Behaviour Change https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Simon.Marshall.on.2017-09-05.at.20.01.mp3 Simon Marshall, PhD, trains the brains of endurance athletes and fitness enthusiasts to become happier and more mentally tough. He is former Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego and Professor of Exercise Science at San Diego State University where he was Director of the Graduate Program in Sport & Exercise Psychology. He has published over 100 scientific articles on the psychology of exercise and has been cited in the scientific literature over 10,000 times. He has served as an invited expert on exercise science for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society. He is currently the Performance Psychologist for the BMC Racing team, an elite WorldTour professional cycling team. As the sherpa-husband of professional triathlete Lesley Paterson, he is the founding member of Team S.H.I.T. (Supportive Husbands in Training) and competes in triathlon or cycling events as the husband of Lesley Paterson.

Find Simon over at braveheartcoach.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Simon Marshall:

[00:00:24] Podcast: Off Road Triathlon World Champion Lesley Paterson on FMT and Solving Mental Conundrums.

[00:01:55] Event: Mastermind Talks.

[00:02:17] Podcast: Radical Candor™ with Dr Tommy Wood.

[00:04:27] Sports psychology background.

[00:06:45] Getting lost in the process.

[00:09:20] Constant horizon seeking.

[00:09:54] Journal Article: Brickman, P., Coates, D., & Janoff-Bulman, R. (1978). Lottery winners and accident victims: Is happiness relative? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36(8), 917-927.

[00:11:00] Book: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson.

[00:12:55] The use of swearing.

[00:14:44] Offense is taken at the ear, not at the mouth.

[00:16:34] Behaviour change.

[00:18:48] Nike Slogan: Just do it.

[00:19:19] Knowledge is not usually enough.

[00:20:29] Motivation is important.

[00:21:03] YouTube: Dr. Jonathan Fader Demonstrates Motivational Interviewing Skills and also see MINT: Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers.

[00:21:56] Stages of change model (diagram).

[00:22:29] Buying a house example.

[00:24:35] Resolving ambivalence.

[00:25:08] Cognitive dissonance.

[00:26:19] Procrastination, denial.

[00:27:36] Anxiety.

[00:29:08] Peer to peer support.

[00:30:33] We bond on vulnerabilities.

[00:31:01] Podcast: NBT People: Toréa Rodriguez.

[00:31:08] YouTube: Bob Newhart-Stop It.

[00:33:05] PaCE: Patient and Clinician Engagement (PaCE) Program 2.0.

[00:35:17] Self-awareness.

[00:36:34] Frequency of monitoring is most important, not accuracy.

[00:37:30] Just in time interventions.

[00:39:10] Breadcrumbs app. Lots of apps with this name!

[00:40:07] Apple watch has haptic technology.

[00:40:36] Podcast: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster with Dr Ellen Langer, PhD.

[00:45:37] Book: Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland.

[00:46:55] Tool: Trello and the kanban board.

[00:48:07] Implementation intentions.

[00:49:30] Project: Human Behaviour-Change Project with Professor Susan Michie, UCL.

[00:50:39] 200 studies a day!

[00:52:20] Software engineers are lazy.

[00:54:48] Do you ever have feelings you don't want?

[00:56:37] App: Headspace.

[00:57:24] Andy Puddicombe.

[01:00:06] Behaviour change in athletes (it's all about performance).

[01:01:13] Braveheart Coaching.

[01:05:22] Gratitude for athletes (3 things every day for 3 weeks).

[01:08:11] The audiobook version of The Brave Athlete arriving Nov/Dec 2017 or get the print version now.

[01:08:39] Athlete SMOG test at Braveheart Coaching.  

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Simon.Marshall.on.2017-09-05.at.20.01.mp3 Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:09:51 GMT Christopher Kelly Simon Marshall, PhD, trains the brains of endurance athletes and fitness enthusiasts to become happier and more mentally tough. He is former Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego and Professor of Exercise Science at San Diego State University where he was Director of the Graduate Program in Sport & Exercise Psychology. He has published over 100 scientific articles on the psychology of exercise and has been cited in the scientific literature over 10,000 times. He has served as an invited expert on exercise science for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society. He is currently the Performance Psychologist for the BMC Racing team, an elite WorldTour professional cycling team. As the sherpa-husband of professional triathlete Lesley Paterson, he is the founding member of Team S.H.I.T. (Supportive Husbands in Training) and competes in triathlon or cycling events as the husband of Lesley Paterson.

Find Simon over at braveheartcoach.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Simon Marshall:

[00:00:24] Podcast: Off Road Triathlon World Champion Lesley Paterson on FMT and Solving Mental Conundrums.

[00:01:55] Event: Mastermind Talks.

[00:02:17] Podcast: Radical Candor™ with Dr Tommy Wood.

[00:04:27] Sports psychology background.

[00:06:45] Getting lost in the process.

[00:09:20] Constant horizon seeking.

[00:09:54] Journal Article: Brickman, P., Coates, D., & Janoff-Bulman, R. (1978). Lottery winners and accident victims: Is happiness relative? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36(8), 917-927.

[00:11:00] Book: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson.

[00:12:55] The use of swearing.

[00:14:44] Offense is taken at the ear, not at the mouth.

[00:16:34] Behaviour change.

[00:18:48] Nike Slogan: Just do it.

[00:19:19] Knowledge is not usually enough.

[00:20:29] Motivation is important.

[00:21:03] YouTube: Dr. Jonathan Fader Demonstrates Motivational Interviewing Skills and also see MINT: Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers.

[00:21:56] Stages of change model (diagram).

[00:22:29] Buying a house example.

[00:24:35] Resolving ambivalence.

[00:25:08] Cognitive dissonance.

[00:26:19] Procrastination, denial.

[00:27:36] Anxiety.

[00:29:08] Peer to peer support.

[00:30:33] We bond on vulnerabilities.

[00:31:01] Podcast: NBT People: Toréa Rodriguez.

[00:31:08] YouTube: Bob Newhart-Stop It.

[00:33:05] PaCE: Patient and Clinician Engagement (PaCE) Program 2.0.

[00:35:17] Self-awareness.

[00:36:34] Frequency of monitoring is most important, not accuracy.

[00:37:30] Just in time interventions.

[00:39:10] Breadcrumbs app. Lots of apps with this name!

[00:40:07] Apple watch has haptic technology.

[00:40:36] Podcast: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster with Dr Ellen Langer, PhD.

[00:45:37] Book: Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time by Jeff Sutherland.

[00:46:55] Tool: Trello and the kanban board.

[00:48:07] Implementation intentions.

[00:49:30] Project: Human Behaviour-Change Project with Professor Susan Michie, UCL.

[00:50:39] 200 studies a day!

[00:52:20] Software engineers are lazy.

[00:54:48] Do you ever have feelings you don't want?

[00:56:37] App: Headspace.

[00:57:24] Andy Puddicombe.

[01:00:06] Behaviour change in athletes (it's all about performance).

[01:01:13] Braveheart Coaching.

[01:05:22] Gratitude for athletes (3 things every day for 3 weeks).

[01:08:11] The audiobook version of The Brave Athlete arriving Nov/Dec 2017 or get the print version now.

[01:08:39] Athlete SMOG test at Braveheart Coaching.  

]]>
no
How to Reverse Insulin Resistant Type Two Diabetes in 100 Million People in Less Than 10 Years https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/James.McCarter.on.2017-09-05.at.16.44.mp3 For decades we’ve heard that diabetes prevention is simple—lose weight, eat less, and exercise more. But something is wrong with the conventional wisdom. Nearly 115 million people live with either diabetes or prediabetes in the United States, and that number is growing. It is time to reverse this trend.

Virta was founded in 2014 with the goal of reversing diabetes in 100 million people by 2025. They have made this possible through advancements in the science of nutritional biochemistry and technology that is changing the diabetes care model.

James McCarter, MD, PhD, is Head of Research at Virta, and in this interview, Dr McCarter explains how Virta is using a combination of a very low carb, ketogenic diet together with 1-on-1 health coaches and some sophisticated machine learning techniques to predict sentiment in natural language and spot anomalies in blood biomarkers.

After the recording was made, Dr McCarter realised that he was off by about a decade on Joslin. Rather than 1920s, Dr. Elliott Joslin actually began keeping a diabetes registry early in the 20th century and published The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in 1917.  “Joslin carried out extensive metabolic balance studies examining fasting and feeding in patients with varying severities of diabetes. His findings would help to validate the observations of Frederick Madison Allen regarding the benefit of carbohydrate- and calorie-restricted diets.”

Here’s the outline of this interview with James McCarter, MD, PhD:

[00:01:00] Divergence, Inc.

[00:01:43] Presentation: The Effects of a Year in Ketosis with James McCarter, MD, PhD at the Quantified Self Conference and Exposition.

[00:02:44] Books by Gary Taubes.

[00:03:13] Omega 3:6 ratios.

[00:05:54] Rapeseed and Canola.

[00:06:44] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:07:11] The Virta story.

[00:07:18] Sami Inkinen.

[00:07:38] Study: SD. Phinney, BR. Bistrian, WJ. Evans, E. Gervino, GL. Blackburn, The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: preservation of submaximal exercise capability with reduced carbohydrate oxidation., Metabolism, volume 32, issue 8, pages 769-76, Aug 1983, PMID 6865776.

[00:08:48] Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on PubMed.

[00:09:51] Fear of fat.

[00:10:13] USDA dietary guidelines.

[00:12:59] The goal is to reverse T2D in 100M people.

[00:14:09] Study: NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC). Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4·4 million participants. Lancet (London, England). 2016;387(10027):1513-1530. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00618-8.

[00:14:29] Joslin Diabetes Center.

[00:16:37] The causes of T2D.

[00:17:35] Calories are now more accessible.

[00:18:22] Sugar and refined carbohydrate intake.

[00:20:26] Prerequisites for the Virta program.

[00:22:19] Telemedicine, health coaches, online nutrition and behaviour education, biometric feedback, peer community.

[00:23:53] Getting off meds.

[00:24:50] HbA1C > 6 or glucose > 120 mg/dL

[00:25:32] Purdue University.

[00:26:28] Podcast: Econtalk: Mark Warshawsky on Compensation, Health Care Costs, and Inequality.

[00:29:02] Study: American Diabetes Association. Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033-1046. doi:10.2337/dc12-2625.

[00:29:27] Study: McKenzie AL, Hallberg SJ, Creighton BC, Volk BM, Link TM, Abner MK, Glon RM, McCarter JP, Volek JS, Phinney SD. A Novel Intervention Including Individualized Nutritional Recommendations Reduces Hemoglobin A1c Level, Medication Use, and Weight in Type 2 Diabetes. JMIR Diabetes. 2017;2(1):e5.

[00:30:45] Discontinuing 2/3 of the meds.

[00:32:54] Health coaching.

[00:34:18] Behaviour change.

[00:35:30] Biometrics, blood BHB.

[00:38:10] Reducing blood pressure and CRP.

[00:38:30] Study: Youm, Yun-Hee, et al. "The ketone metabolite [beta]-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease." Nature medicine 21.3 (2015): 263-269.

[00:39:49] Blood levels of BHB and weight loss.

[00:41:36] STEM-Talk #43: Jeff Volek Explains the Power of Ketogenic Diets to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:43:33] Machine learning.

[00:45:57] The Team at Virta including Nasir Bhanpuri, Catalin Voss and Jackie Lee. See article Will robots inherit the world of healthcare? For links to their talks.

[00:46:49] Random Forest.

[00:47:06] Nourish Balance Thrive 7-Minute Analysis.

[00:48:05] Natural Language Processing.

[00:48:57] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[00:50:26] Finding purpose in your work.

[00:51:59] Using machine learning to change behaviour.

[00:53:25] Book: Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products by Nir Eyal.

[00:54:11] Podcast: How to Avoid the Cognitive Middle Gear with James Hewitt.

[00:55:37] $400 per month for one year.

[00:57:58] Blog Post: Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[01:00:21] Article: Understanding Local Control of Thyroid Hormones:(Deiodinases Function and Activity) and Podcast: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:02:12] Podcast: How Busy Realtors Can Avoid Anxiety and Depression Without Prescriptions or the Help of a Doctor with Douglas Hilbert.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/James.McCarter.on.2017-09-05.at.16.44.mp3 Sat, 16 Sep 2017 06:09:46 GMT Christopher Kelly For decades we’ve heard that diabetes prevention is simple—lose weight, eat less, and exercise more. But something is wrong with the conventional wisdom. Nearly 115 million people live with either diabetes or prediabetes in the United States, and that number is growing. It is time to reverse this trend.

Virta was founded in 2014 with the goal of reversing diabetes in 100 million people by 2025. They have made this possible through advancements in the science of nutritional biochemistry and technology that is changing the diabetes care model.

James McCarter, MD, PhD, is Head of Research at Virta, and in this interview, Dr McCarter explains how Virta is using a combination of a very low carb, ketogenic diet together with 1-on-1 health coaches and some sophisticated machine learning techniques to predict sentiment in natural language and spot anomalies in blood biomarkers.

After the recording was made, Dr McCarter realised that he was off by about a decade on Joslin. Rather than 1920s, Dr. Elliott Joslin actually began keeping a diabetes registry early in the 20th century and published The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in 1917.  “Joslin carried out extensive metabolic balance studies examining fasting and feeding in patients with varying severities of diabetes. His findings would help to validate the observations of Frederick Madison Allen regarding the benefit of carbohydrate- and calorie-restricted diets.”

Here’s the outline of this interview with James McCarter, MD, PhD:

[00:01:00] Divergence, Inc.

[00:01:43] Presentation: The Effects of a Year in Ketosis with James McCarter, MD, PhD at the Quantified Self Conference and Exposition.

[00:02:44] Books by Gary Taubes.

[00:03:13] Omega 3:6 ratios.

[00:05:54] Rapeseed and Canola.

[00:06:44] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:07:11] The Virta story.

[00:07:18] Sami Inkinen.

[00:07:38] Study: SD. Phinney, BR. Bistrian, WJ. Evans, E. Gervino, GL. Blackburn, The human metabolic response to chronic ketosis without caloric restriction: preservation of submaximal exercise capability with reduced carbohydrate oxidation., Metabolism, volume 32, issue 8, pages 769-76, Aug 1983, PMID 6865776.

[00:08:48] Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on PubMed.

[00:09:51] Fear of fat.

[00:10:13] USDA dietary guidelines.

[00:12:59] The goal is to reverse T2D in 100M people.

[00:14:09] Study: NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC). Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4·4 million participants. Lancet (London, England). 2016;387(10027):1513-1530. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)00618-8.

[00:14:29] Joslin Diabetes Center.

[00:16:37] The causes of T2D.

[00:17:35] Calories are now more accessible.

[00:18:22] Sugar and refined carbohydrate intake.

[00:20:26] Prerequisites for the Virta program.

[00:22:19] Telemedicine, health coaches, online nutrition and behaviour education, biometric feedback, peer community.

[00:23:53] Getting off meds.

[00:24:50] HbA1C > 6 or glucose > 120 mg/dL

[00:25:32] Purdue University.

[00:26:28] Podcast: Econtalk: Mark Warshawsky on Compensation, Health Care Costs, and Inequality.

[00:29:02] Study: American Diabetes Association. Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033-1046. doi:10.2337/dc12-2625.

[00:29:27] Study: McKenzie AL, Hallberg SJ, Creighton BC, Volk BM, Link TM, Abner MK, Glon RM, McCarter JP, Volek JS, Phinney SD. A Novel Intervention Including Individualized Nutritional Recommendations Reduces Hemoglobin A1c Level, Medication Use, and Weight in Type 2 Diabetes. JMIR Diabetes. 2017;2(1):e5.

[00:30:45] Discontinuing 2/3 of the meds.

[00:32:54] Health coaching.

[00:34:18] Behaviour change.

[00:35:30] Biometrics, blood BHB.

[00:38:10] Reducing blood pressure and CRP.

[00:38:30] Study: Youm, Yun-Hee, et al. "The ketone metabolite [beta]-hydroxybutyrate blocks NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammatory disease." Nature medicine 21.3 (2015): 263-269.

[00:39:49] Blood levels of BHB and weight loss.

[00:41:36] STEM-Talk #43: Jeff Volek Explains the Power of Ketogenic Diets to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:43:33] Machine learning.

[00:45:57] The Team at Virta including Nasir Bhanpuri, Catalin Voss and Jackie Lee. See article Will robots inherit the world of healthcare? For links to their talks.

[00:46:49] Random Forest.

[00:47:06] Nourish Balance Thrive 7-Minute Analysis.

[00:48:05] Natural Language Processing.

[00:48:57] Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[00:50:26] Finding purpose in your work.

[00:51:59] Using machine learning to change behaviour.

[00:53:25] Book: Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products by Nir Eyal.

[00:54:11] Podcast: How to Avoid the Cognitive Middle Gear with James Hewitt.

[00:55:37] $400 per month for one year.

[00:57:58] Blog Post: Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD.

[01:00:21] Article: Understanding Local Control of Thyroid Hormones:(Deiodinases Function and Activity) and Podcast: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Dr. Tommy Wood.

[01:02:12] Podcast: How Busy Realtors Can Avoid Anxiety and Depression Without Prescriptions or the Help of a Doctor with Douglas Hilbert.

]]>
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National Cyclocross Champion Katie Compton on Ketosis and MTHFR https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Katie.Compton.on.2017-07-25.at.11.10.mp3 When a 13-time National Champion reaches out to say that she’s been enjoying your podcast, there’s only one thing you can do: invite her onto the show. I love to spend time talking to elite athletes to find out what makes them tick, and one trait I’ve seen consistently in cyclists is they spend a lot more time maintaining the engine than they do worrying about equipment.

Frequently, and like me, the athlete is forced to be their own health detective. Never was this truer than for Katie, and in this interview, she talks about her experience tracking down the causes of her chronic leg pains that often prevented her from racing and training. Katie also talks about her experience eating a very high-fat, ketogenic diet, and it's one that we’ve seen consistently with the clients we work with at NBT.

Photo: CX Magazine.

Here’s the outline of this interview Katie Compton:

[00:00:50] Why cyclocross?

[00:02:51] Single-speed MTB.

[00:03:58] Level of commitment.

[00:05:36] Book: The Chimp Paradox: The Mind Management Program to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence, and Happiness by Steve Peters.

[00:06:43] The start of a World Cup Cyclocross race.

[00:08:51] Training track at the USOC Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

[00:09:32] Health issues.

[00:10:14] App: Overcast podcast player.

[00:11:03] Leg pains.

[00:11:39] Allergies, thyroid, asthma, staph, giardia.

[00:12:08] MTHFR.

[00:14:29] MRSA infection, abscess.

[00:14:37] Podcast: All Things Thyroid with Dr. Michael Ruscio on Livin’ La Vida Low Carb.

[00:15:33] Homozygous MTHFR A1298C.

[00:16:08] 23andMe genetic testing.

[00:17:52] Folic acid.

[00:18:22] Methylfolate supplement.

[00:19:48] Reducing processed food intake.

[00:21:09] Enriching grains.

[00:21:39] 100g CHO per day.

[00:22:15] Racing in ketosis.

[00:24:44] Increased aerobic capacity.

[00:25:52] Avoiding sports nutrition products.

[00:27:33] Study: Zinn C, Wood M, Williden M, Chatterton S, Maunder E. Ketogenic diet benefits body composition and well-being but not performance in a pilot case study of New Zealand endurance athletes. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2017;14:22. doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0180-0 and Podcast: Caryn Zinn PhD on ketogenic diet for athletes.

[00:30:55] Missing 5th gear.

[00:32:05] Decreased recovery after high intensity work.

[00:32:52] Quantifying things, power, calories.

[00:34:34] App: myCircadianClock by Satchin Panda Lab.

[00:36:42] Coping with jet lag.

[00:39:10] Disordered eating.

[00:40:30] Don't stress over the pesky details.

[00:41:06] Book: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson.

[00:42:11] Sweet potato, squash, fruit, brown rice, buckwheat flour.

[00:44:27] Buffalo and Elk.

[00:44:54] Eating in Belgium.

[00:47:33] Trek Factory Racing and a video of the Trek Service Course in Belgium presented by Shimano.

[00:48:19] Katie Compton on Twitter and Instagram.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Katie.Compton.on.2017-07-25.at.11.10.mp3 Thu, 07 Sep 2017 10:09:38 GMT Christopher Kelly When a 13-time National Champion reaches out to say that she’s been enjoying your podcast, there’s only one thing you can do: invite her onto the show. I love to spend time talking to elite athletes to find out what makes them tick, and one trait I’ve seen consistently in cyclists is they spend a lot more time maintaining the engine than they do worrying about equipment.

Frequently, and like me, the athlete is forced to be their own health detective. Never was this truer than for Katie, and in this interview, she talks about her experience tracking down the causes of her chronic leg pains that often prevented her from racing and training. Katie also talks about her experience eating a very high-fat, ketogenic diet, and it's one that we’ve seen consistently with the clients we work with at NBT.

Photo: CX Magazine.

Here’s the outline of this interview Katie Compton:

[00:00:50] Why cyclocross?

[00:02:51] Single-speed MTB.

[00:03:58] Level of commitment.

[00:05:36] Book: The Chimp Paradox: The Mind Management Program to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence, and Happiness by Steve Peters.

[00:06:43] The start of a World Cup Cyclocross race.

[00:08:51] Training track at the USOC Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

[00:09:32] Health issues.

[00:10:14] App: Overcast podcast player.

[00:11:03] Leg pains.

[00:11:39] Allergies, thyroid, asthma, staph, giardia.

[00:12:08] MTHFR.

[00:14:29] MRSA infection, abscess.

[00:14:37] Podcast: All Things Thyroid with Dr. Michael Ruscio on Livin’ La Vida Low Carb.

[00:15:33] Homozygous MTHFR A1298C.

[00:16:08] 23andMe genetic testing.

[00:17:52] Folic acid.

[00:18:22] Methylfolate supplement.

[00:19:48] Reducing processed food intake.

[00:21:09] Enriching grains.

[00:21:39] 100g CHO per day.

[00:22:15] Racing in ketosis.

[00:24:44] Increased aerobic capacity.

[00:25:52] Avoiding sports nutrition products.

[00:27:33] Study: Zinn C, Wood M, Williden M, Chatterton S, Maunder E. Ketogenic diet benefits body composition and well-being but not performance in a pilot case study of New Zealand endurance athletes. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2017;14:22. doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0180-0 and Podcast: Caryn Zinn PhD on ketogenic diet for athletes.

[00:30:55] Missing 5th gear.

[00:32:05] Decreased recovery after high intensity work.

[00:32:52] Quantifying things, power, calories.

[00:34:34] App: myCircadianClock by Satchin Panda Lab.

[00:36:42] Coping with jet lag.

[00:39:10] Disordered eating.

[00:40:30] Don't stress over the pesky details.

[00:41:06] Book: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson.

[00:42:11] Sweet potato, squash, fruit, brown rice, buckwheat flour.

[00:44:27] Buffalo and Elk.

[00:44:54] Eating in Belgium.

[00:47:33] Trek Factory Racing and a video of the Trek Service Course in Belgium presented by Shimano.

[00:48:19] Katie Compton on Twitter and Instagram.

]]>
yes
The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Dr Tommy Wood https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Weightloss.2017.07.22.mp3 Solving a problem requires understanding what caused it, and rarely is it good enough to move straight to remediation. The same applies to weight (fat) loss, and in this podcast, Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and me discuss the underlying causes of over fatness and draw on three specific examples that represent common patterns we’ve seen in the 1,000 athletes we’ve worked with over the past three or four years.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:00:13] Podcast: Mind Pump Simulcast.

[00:01:44] Problem solving.

[00:03:22] Sustainability.

[00:03:38] First Example: Elite female runner.

[00:04:23] Relative energy deficit.

[00:08:42] Description of NEAT or Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

[00:09:03] Study: Pontzer, Herman, et al. "Constrained total energy expenditure and metabolic adaptation to physical activity in adult humans." Current Biology 26.3 (2016): 410-417.

[00:11:33] Greasing the groove.

[00:12:44] Counting and cycling calories.

[00:14:27] 10% deficit.

[00:15:42] Pharmacological interventions.

[00:16:34] Second Example: Christopher Kelly.

[00:16:48] Gravel grinder events.

[00:17:07] Belgian Waffle Ride.

[00:18:05] Reintroducing carbs.

[00:19:45] Thyroid on keto.

[00:20:26] Kiteboarding.

[00:20:55] eBook: What We Eat (scroll to bottom of page).

[00:22:24] Self regulating.

[00:23:42] Visceral and subcutaneous fat.

[00:25:25] Visceral fat has a higher fat turnover.

[00:26:34] Killing fat cells with cold thermogenesis.

[00:26:59] Lipodystrophy.

[00:27:34] Gut health.

[00:27:57] Blastocystis, Cyclospora.

[00:30:47] Gut health and inflammation.

[00:30:59] Podcast: Arrhythmias in Endurance Athletes with Peter Backx, PhD.

[00:31:50] HsCRP.

[00:32:14] Podcast: The Hungry Brain with Stephan Guyenet, PhD.

[00:33:56] Study: Jönsson, Tommy, et al. "Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding between leptin and its receptor." BMC biochemistry 16.1 (2015): 3.

[00:34:47] Paleo On The Go.

[00:35:43] Visceral fat firewalls off the gut.

[00:36:10] LPS (endotoxin) translocation across the gut wall.

[00:40:22] Getting a dog.

[00:41:28] MitoCalc developed by Alessandro Ferretti and Weikko Jaross as discussed in this NBT blog post by Dr. Tommy Wood.

[00:43:21] Time restricted eating.

[00:44:24] Walking.

[00:45:13] Podcast: The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athletes with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:46:27] Third example: 35 lb to lose.

[00:47:44] The under eating thyroid pattern.

[00:48:16] Understanding Local Control of Thyroid Hormones:(Deiodinases Function and Activity).

[00:50:35] Resistance training.

[00:51:13] Muscle is more metabolically active.

[00:52:07] Podcast: Breaking Through Plateaus and Sustainable Fat-Loss with Jason Seib.

[00:53:02] DXA or DEXA Scan.

[00:53:14] Waist-hip ratio.

[00:54:08] I'll happy when...

[00:54:41] Icelandic Health Symposium 2017 featuring Dr. Satchidananda Panda, Dr. Tommy Wood and others.

[00:55:58] Study: Longo, Valter D., and Satchidananda Panda. "Fasting, circadian rhythms, and time-restricted feeding in healthy lifespan." Cell metabolism 23.6 (2016): 1048-1059.

[00:56:16] There are over 600 genes regulated by circadian rhythm, reference 1, 2, 3 and 4.

[00:56:56] Continuous feeding.

[00:57:58] Eat when it's light outside.

[00:58:47] Yearly cycles.

[00:59:55] Frontloading calories.

[01:00:40] The Nourish Balance Thrive 7-Minute Analysis.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Weightloss.2017.07.22.mp3 Thu, 31 Aug 2017 23:08:49 GMT Christopher Kelly Solving a problem requires understanding what caused it, and rarely is it good enough to move straight to remediation. The same applies to weight (fat) loss, and in this podcast, Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and me discuss the underlying causes of over fatness and draw on three specific examples that represent common patterns we’ve seen in the 1,000 athletes we’ve worked with over the past three or four years.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:00:13] Podcast: Mind Pump Simulcast.

[00:01:44] Problem solving.

[00:03:22] Sustainability.

[00:03:38] First Example: Elite female runner.

[00:04:23] Relative energy deficit.

[00:08:42] Description of NEAT or Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis.

[00:09:03] Study: Pontzer, Herman, et al. "Constrained total energy expenditure and metabolic adaptation to physical activity in adult humans." Current Biology 26.3 (2016): 410-417.

[00:11:33] Greasing the groove.

[00:12:44] Counting and cycling calories.

[00:14:27] 10% deficit.

[00:15:42] Pharmacological interventions.

[00:16:34] Second Example: Christopher Kelly.

[00:16:48] Gravel grinder events.

[00:17:07] Belgian Waffle Ride.

[00:18:05] Reintroducing carbs.

[00:19:45] Thyroid on keto.

[00:20:26] Kiteboarding.

[00:20:55] eBook: What We Eat (scroll to bottom of page).

[00:22:24] Self regulating.

[00:23:42] Visceral and subcutaneous fat.

[00:25:25] Visceral fat has a higher fat turnover.

[00:26:34] Killing fat cells with cold thermogenesis.

[00:26:59] Lipodystrophy.

[00:27:34] Gut health.

[00:27:57] Blastocystis, Cyclospora.

[00:30:47] Gut health and inflammation.

[00:30:59] Podcast: Arrhythmias in Endurance Athletes with Peter Backx, PhD.

[00:31:50] HsCRP.

[00:32:14] Podcast: The Hungry Brain with Stephan Guyenet, PhD.

[00:33:56] Study: Jönsson, Tommy, et al. "Digested wheat gluten inhibits binding between leptin and its receptor." BMC biochemistry 16.1 (2015): 3.

[00:34:47] Paleo On The Go.

[00:35:43] Visceral fat firewalls off the gut.

[00:36:10] LPS (endotoxin) translocation across the gut wall.

[00:40:22] Getting a dog.

[00:41:28] MitoCalc developed by Alessandro Ferretti and Weikko Jaross as discussed in this NBT blog post by Dr. Tommy Wood.

[00:43:21] Time restricted eating.

[00:44:24] Walking.

[00:45:13] Podcast: The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athletes with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:46:27] Third example: 35 lb to lose.

[00:47:44] The under eating thyroid pattern.

[00:48:16] Understanding Local Control of Thyroid Hormones:(Deiodinases Function and Activity).

[00:50:35] Resistance training.

[00:51:13] Muscle is more metabolically active.

[00:52:07] Podcast: Breaking Through Plateaus and Sustainable Fat-Loss with Jason Seib.

[00:53:02] DXA or DEXA Scan.

[00:53:14] Waist-hip ratio.

[00:54:08] I'll happy when...

[00:54:41] Icelandic Health Symposium 2017 featuring Dr. Satchidananda Panda, Dr. Tommy Wood and others.

[00:55:58] Study: Longo, Valter D., and Satchidananda Panda. "Fasting, circadian rhythms, and time-restricted feeding in healthy lifespan." Cell metabolism 23.6 (2016): 1048-1059.

[00:56:16] There are over 600 genes regulated by circadian rhythm, reference 1, 2, 3 and 4.

[00:56:56] Continuous feeding.

[00:57:58] Eat when it's light outside.

[00:58:47] Yearly cycles.

[00:59:55] Frontloading calories.

[01:00:40] The Nourish Balance Thrive 7-Minute Analysis.

]]>
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How to Avoid the Cognitive Middle Gear https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/James.Hewitt.1-1.on.2017-06-09.at.07.06.mp3 James Hewitt is Head of Science & Innovation at Hintsa Performance. His work includes consulting with Formula 1 drivers and teams, work in elite sport and with global corporations, a wide-range of written articles, presentations, keynotes and workshops in Europe, the United States and Asia.

In this interview with Dr Tommy Wood, James discusses a polarised approach to cognitive performance, arguing that time spent in the middle gear is time wasted. James also explains why smartphones are so compelling yet interfering with our ability to concentrate.

Here’s the outline of this interview with James Hewitt:

[00:01:15] Book: Exponential by James Hewitt and Aki Hintsa.

[00:03:31] Website: Hintsa Performance.

[00:04:20] Newsletter: Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights.

[00:04:50] Article: A day in the life of Scott, hopelessly distracted office worker by James Hewitt.

[00:05:38] Polarised training.

[00:06:18] Cognitive task load model.

[00:08:01] World Economic Forum Report: The Future of Jobs and Skills in the Middle East and North Africa: Preparing the Region for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

[00:09:18] Podcast: Pedro Domingos on Machine Learning and the Master Algorithm, TED Talk: The Wonderful and Terrifying Implications of Computers that Can Learn with Jeremy Howard.

[00:11:00] Study: Frey, Carl Benedikt, and Michael A. Osborne. "The future of employment: how susceptible are jobs to computerisation?." Technological Forecasting and Social Change 114 (2017): 254-280.

[00:11:10] Report: A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity by McKinsey Global Institute.

[00:12:29] Default mode network.

[00:13:31] Smartphones.

[00:14:59] Novelty seeking.

[00:16:26] Study: Kushlev, Kostadin & Dunn, Elizabeth. (2015). Checking Email Less Frequently Reduces Stress.

[00:17:11] Lecture: Dopamine Jackpot! Sapolsky on the Science of Pleasure by Robert Sapolsky.

[00:19:25] Productivity without purpose.

[00:19:45] Study: Levitas, Danielle. "Always connected: How smartphones and social keep us engaged." International Data Corporation (IDC). Retrieved from (2013).

[00:21:05] Three questions: priority, opportunity, elimination.

[00:22:30] Attention restoration.

[00:24:40] Mornings.

[00:25:21] Book: The Power of When: Discover Your Chronotype--and the Best Time to Eat Lunch, Ask for a Raise, Have Sex, Write a Novel, Take Your Meds, and More by Michael Breus.

[00:25:43] Study: Akacem LD, Wright KP, LeBourgeois MK. Bedtime and evening light exposure influence circadian timing in preschool-age children: A field study. Neurobiology of sleep and circadian rhythms. 2016.

[00:28:59] Study: Williamson AM, Feyer A Moderate sleep deprivation produces impairments in cognitive and motor performance equivalent to legally prescribed levels of alcohol intoxication Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2000;57:649-655.

[00:30:06] Study: Van Dongen, Hans Pa, et al. "The Cumulative Cost of Additional Wakefulness: Dose-response Effects on Neurobehavioral Functions and Sleep Physiology From Chronic Sleep Restriction and Total Sleep Deprivation." Sleep 26.2 (2003): 117-126.

[00:32:21] Galvanic skin response.

[00:34:43] Sex differences in rapid switching.

[00:37:46] Changing behaviour.

[00:38:01] Derek Sivers.

[00:39:25] Implementation intention.

[00:42:15] Positive vision.

[00:45:45] Apps: Depak Chopra Meditation Apps.

[00:50:16] Device: The PIP stress tracker.

[00:52:44] Device: Muse headband.

[00:53:49] Ways to connect: Hinsta.com, JamesHewitt.net, James Hewitt on Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/James.Hewitt.1-1.on.2017-06-09.at.07.06.mp3 Thu, 24 Aug 2017 10:08:13 GMT Christopher Kelly James Hewitt is Head of Science & Innovation at Hintsa Performance. His work includes consulting with Formula 1 drivers and teams, work in elite sport and with global corporations, a wide-range of written articles, presentations, keynotes and workshops in Europe, the United States and Asia.

In this interview with Dr Tommy Wood, James discusses a polarised approach to cognitive performance, arguing that time spent in the middle gear is time wasted. James also explains why smartphones are so compelling yet interfering with our ability to concentrate.

Here’s the outline of this interview with James Hewitt:

[00:01:15] Book: Exponential by James Hewitt and Aki Hintsa.

[00:03:31] Website: Hintsa Performance.

[00:04:20] Newsletter: Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights.

[00:04:50] Article: A day in the life of Scott, hopelessly distracted office worker by James Hewitt.

[00:05:38] Polarised training.

[00:06:18] Cognitive task load model.

[00:08:01] World Economic Forum Report: The Future of Jobs and Skills in the Middle East and North Africa: Preparing the Region for the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

[00:09:18] Podcast: Pedro Domingos on Machine Learning and the Master Algorithm, TED Talk: The Wonderful and Terrifying Implications of Computers that Can Learn with Jeremy Howard.

[00:11:00] Study: Frey, Carl Benedikt, and Michael A. Osborne. "The future of employment: how susceptible are jobs to computerisation?." Technological Forecasting and Social Change 114 (2017): 254-280.

[00:11:10] Report: A Future That Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity by McKinsey Global Institute.

[00:12:29] Default mode network.

[00:13:31] Smartphones.

[00:14:59] Novelty seeking.

[00:16:26] Study: Kushlev, Kostadin & Dunn, Elizabeth. (2015). Checking Email Less Frequently Reduces Stress.

[00:17:11] Lecture: Dopamine Jackpot! Sapolsky on the Science of Pleasure by Robert Sapolsky.

[00:19:25] Productivity without purpose.

[00:19:45] Study: Levitas, Danielle. "Always connected: How smartphones and social keep us engaged." International Data Corporation (IDC). Retrieved from (2013).

[00:21:05] Three questions: priority, opportunity, elimination.

[00:22:30] Attention restoration.

[00:24:40] Mornings.

[00:25:21] Book: The Power of When: Discover Your Chronotype--and the Best Time to Eat Lunch, Ask for a Raise, Have Sex, Write a Novel, Take Your Meds, and More by Michael Breus.

[00:25:43] Study: Akacem LD, Wright KP, LeBourgeois MK. Bedtime and evening light exposure influence circadian timing in preschool-age children: A field study. Neurobiology of sleep and circadian rhythms. 2016.

[00:28:59] Study: Williamson AM, Feyer A Moderate sleep deprivation produces impairments in cognitive and motor performance equivalent to legally prescribed levels of alcohol intoxication Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2000;57:649-655.

[00:30:06] Study: Van Dongen, Hans Pa, et al. "The Cumulative Cost of Additional Wakefulness: Dose-response Effects on Neurobehavioral Functions and Sleep Physiology From Chronic Sleep Restriction and Total Sleep Deprivation." Sleep 26.2 (2003): 117-126.

[00:32:21] Galvanic skin response.

[00:34:43] Sex differences in rapid switching.

[00:37:46] Changing behaviour.

[00:38:01] Derek Sivers.

[00:39:25] Implementation intention.

[00:42:15] Positive vision.

[00:45:45] Apps: Depak Chopra Meditation Apps.

[00:50:16] Device: The PIP stress tracker.

[00:52:44] Device: Muse headband.

[00:53:49] Ways to connect: Hinsta.com, JamesHewitt.net, James Hewitt on Twitter.

]]>
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How to Move Well and Feel Good with Aaron Alexander https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Aaron.Alexander.2017.06%201.mp3 Aaron Alexander has been professionally working with clients of all ages seeking a variety of goals from pain relief to improved athletic performance for over 10 years. He is currently seeing clients at his office, Align Therapy, inside of Crossfit LA, Santa Monica. Aaron began the journey as a nationally certified personal trainer specializing in corrective exercise and nutrition consultation. During that time Aaron studied psychology at the University of Hawaii. Soon after, he evolved into becoming a licensed manual therapist studying myofascial release, neuromuscular therapy and trigger point therapy at Maui School of Therapeutic Massage. A fascination with connective tissue lead him to study structural integration at the Rolf Institute in Boulder, CO. Being an LMT and CPT on top of a Rolf Structural Integration Practitioner, Aaron has a strong understanding of the intricacies of the body and mind.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Aaron Alexander:

[00:02:17] The link between posture and the way we feel.

[00:04:35] Sustaining posture.

[00:06:37] Front squat, deadlift, kettlebells, martial arts.

[00:07:20] 150 interviews on the Align Therapy podcast.

[00:07:54] Interview: Self-Care and Integrated Movement for the Modern World with Aaron Alexander.

[00:08:05] Chin up bar.

[00:09:54] Body language.

[00:12:16] Changing our environment.

[00:13:44] YouTube: Functional Chair with Hip Hinging with Aaron Alexander..

[00:14:36] YouTube: Reverse Bad Posture on a Cell Phone with Aaron Alexander.

[00:15:31] The rubber band on Aaron's website.

[00:18:30] Creating the stack.

[00:19:37] Interview: The Importance of Strength and Mobility for Mountain Bikers with James Wilson.

[00:20:46] Travel tips.

[00:23:19] NEAT: Non-Exercise Associated Thermogenesis.

[00:25:23] Stand up paddling.

[00:26:32] Youtube: How to Swing an Axe/Maul When Splitting Firewood.

[00:29:30] Kiteboarding.

[00:31:38] Interview: The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athletes with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:32:18] Overhead squat, break the stick.

[00:33:17] Uneven beach muscles.

[00:35:32] Vision.

[00:35:47] Abraham Maslow and Maslow’s Hammer.

[00:36:43] The road trip.

[00:38:19] Finding your tribe.

[00:40:01] Robb Wolf.

[00:40:14] Book: Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work by Steven Kotler.

[00:40:36] Robert Sapolsky.

[00:41:49] Study social group.

[00:43:36] Podcast: Aaron Alexander on Mind Pump.

[00:44:54] AcroYoga.

[00:48:27] The EPP pre-requisites.

[00:49:05] Mastermind Talks.

[00:50:07] Standing on the shoulder of giants.

[00:51:34] YouTube Channel: Nourish Balance Thrive.

[00:52:38] The Glottal T.

[00:53:57] Group coaching.

[00:56:26] Align Therapy Courses.

[01:00:23] Gym bodies.

[01:01:08] UJ Ramdas Productivity Planner on IntelligentChange.com.

[01:02:17] Santa Cruz Nomad.

[01:03:32] Productivity Planner.

[01:07:33] Movement makeover.

[01:09:21] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Josh Turknett.

[01:11:46] Lack of intention.

[01:12:54] Go see Aaron at Crossfit LA in Santa Monica.

[01:13:15] Barbell Shrugged.

[01:15:55] Align Podcast.

[01:16:27] Band with door anchor.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Aaron.Alexander.2017.06%201.mp3 Fri, 18 Aug 2017 03:08:52 GMT Christopher Kelly Aaron Alexander has been professionally working with clients of all ages seeking a variety of goals from pain relief to improved athletic performance for over 10 years. He is currently seeing clients at his office, Align Therapy, inside of Crossfit LA, Santa Monica. Aaron began the journey as a nationally certified personal trainer specializing in corrective exercise and nutrition consultation. During that time Aaron studied psychology at the University of Hawaii. Soon after, he evolved into becoming a licensed manual therapist studying myofascial release, neuromuscular therapy and trigger point therapy at Maui School of Therapeutic Massage. A fascination with connective tissue lead him to study structural integration at the Rolf Institute in Boulder, CO. Being an LMT and CPT on top of a Rolf Structural Integration Practitioner, Aaron has a strong understanding of the intricacies of the body and mind.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Aaron Alexander:

[00:02:17] The link between posture and the way we feel.

[00:04:35] Sustaining posture.

[00:06:37] Front squat, deadlift, kettlebells, martial arts.

[00:07:20] 150 interviews on the Align Therapy podcast.

[00:07:54] Interview: Self-Care and Integrated Movement for the Modern World with Aaron Alexander.

[00:08:05] Chin up bar.

[00:09:54] Body language.

[00:12:16] Changing our environment.

[00:13:44] YouTube: Functional Chair with Hip Hinging with Aaron Alexander..

[00:14:36] YouTube: Reverse Bad Posture on a Cell Phone with Aaron Alexander.

[00:15:31] The rubber band on Aaron's website.

[00:18:30] Creating the stack.

[00:19:37] Interview: The Importance of Strength and Mobility for Mountain Bikers with James Wilson.

[00:20:46] Travel tips.

[00:23:19] NEAT: Non-Exercise Associated Thermogenesis.

[00:25:23] Stand up paddling.

[00:26:32] Youtube: How to Swing an Axe/Maul When Splitting Firewood.

[00:29:30] Kiteboarding.

[00:31:38] Interview: The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athletes with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:32:18] Overhead squat, break the stick.

[00:33:17] Uneven beach muscles.

[00:35:32] Vision.

[00:35:47] Abraham Maslow and Maslow’s Hammer.

[00:36:43] The road trip.

[00:38:19] Finding your tribe.

[00:40:01] Robb Wolf.

[00:40:14] Book: Stealing Fire: How Silicon Valley, the Navy SEALs, and Maverick Scientists Are Revolutionizing the Way We Live and Work by Steven Kotler.

[00:40:36] Robert Sapolsky.

[00:41:49] Study social group.

[00:43:36] Podcast: Aaron Alexander on Mind Pump.

[00:44:54] AcroYoga.

[00:48:27] The EPP pre-requisites.

[00:49:05] Mastermind Talks.

[00:50:07] Standing on the shoulder of giants.

[00:51:34] YouTube Channel: Nourish Balance Thrive.

[00:52:38] The Glottal T.

[00:53:57] Group coaching.

[00:56:26] Align Therapy Courses.

[01:00:23] Gym bodies.

[01:01:08] UJ Ramdas Productivity Planner on IntelligentChange.com.

[01:02:17] Santa Cruz Nomad.

[01:03:32] Productivity Planner.

[01:07:33] Movement makeover.

[01:09:21] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Josh Turknett.

[01:11:46] Lack of intention.

[01:12:54] Go see Aaron at Crossfit LA in Santa Monica.

[01:13:15] Barbell Shrugged.

[01:15:55] Align Podcast.

[01:16:27] Band with door anchor.

]]>
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Why Do and How to High Intensity Interval Training https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Paul.Laursen.2017.06.7.mp3 Paul Laursen, PhD, is an adjunct professor, performance physiologist and coach. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers in exercise and sports science journals, and this work has been cited more than 3000 times.

Paul is coach and support to numerous elite and professional athletes across multiple endurance-based sports and is himself lightning-fast triathlete with performances across Olympic to Ironman distance events. Paul is an early adopter and technology-savvy geeks at the pointy end of discovery.

In this interview, I’m joined by Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, to discuss high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Earlier this year, I went straight into some 3-8 hour races having done no long (20 min work period) intervals at all, a first for me as a competitive mountain biker. Almost all of my training consisted of MAF paced work and so I wondered why I ever did HIIT and that lead to this show.

You can find Paul at his new home over at plewsandprof.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Paul Laursen:

[00:00:24] High Performance Sport New Zealand.

[00:00:34] Professor Paul Laursen on PubMed.

[00:03:19] Endurance athlete definition.

[00:05:00] Intensity definition.

[00:05:44] Critical Power.

[00:07:38] Aerobic threshold: 1 mmol increase in blood lactate above baseline (MAF).

[00:08:52] Critical Power: maximal lactate steady state (30-60 min).

[00:09:40] VO2 Max (2.5 min up to 8 min).

[00:10:38] Anaerobic Speed Reserve Project by Gareth Sandford.

[00:10:50] Maximal Power.

[00:12:53] 2K rowing test.

[00:17:43] More than one way to skin a cat.

[00:19:51] Continuous blood glucose monitoring.

[00:20:20] Polarised training model.

[00:21:49] Does grey zone training provide some benefit you can't get from polarised?

[00:23:13] Stress fractures.

[00:25:09] Mindfulness.

[00:26:35] Dr Daniel Plews.

[00:28:17] Training for IRONMAN.

[00:28:51] 80/20 aerobic/intensity.

[00:31:47] TrainingPeaks TSS.

[00:32:17] BANISTER, E. W. (1991). Modelling elite athletic performance. In: MacDougall, J.D.; Wenger, H.A. & Green, H.J. eds. Physiological testing of the high performance athlete. Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics Publishers Ltd., pp 403–424.

[00:32:57] TrainingPeaks Performance Management chart.

[00:34:28] Blog: Marco Altini on Heart Rate Variability (HRV).

[00:35:05] Paper: Comparison of Heart Rate Variability Recording With Smart Phone Photoplethysmographic, Polar H7 Chest Strap and Electrocardiogram Methods” by Plews DJ et al.

[00:36:41] Website: Brain.fm.

[00:37:50] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Dr Josh Turknett, MD.

[00:39:09] Overall rise in HRV in a weekly block of training.

[00:40:32] Marco Altini tweet chart.

[00:41:15] Website: HRV for Training.

[00:41:51] Dr Daniel Plews.

[00:41:59] Mark Buchet?

[00:43:20] The format of the book.

[00:44:37] Artificial Intelligence (AI).

[00:46:17] Dr Ken Ford and his publications.

[00:46:45] Podcast: STEM-Talk.

[00:46:56] Website: Plews and Prof, Plews and Prof on Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Paul.Laursen.2017.06.7.mp3 Thu, 10 Aug 2017 11:08:48 GMT Christopher Kelly Paul Laursen, PhD, is an adjunct professor, performance physiologist and coach. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers in exercise and sports science journals, and this work has been cited more than 3000 times.

Paul is coach and support to numerous elite and professional athletes across multiple endurance-based sports and is himself lightning-fast triathlete with performances across Olympic to Ironman distance events. Paul is an early adopter and technology-savvy geeks at the pointy end of discovery.

In this interview, I’m joined by Tommy Wood, MD, PhD, to discuss high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Earlier this year, I went straight into some 3-8 hour races having done no long (20 min work period) intervals at all, a first for me as a competitive mountain biker. Almost all of my training consisted of MAF paced work and so I wondered why I ever did HIIT and that lead to this show.

You can find Paul at his new home over at plewsandprof.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Paul Laursen:

[00:00:24] High Performance Sport New Zealand.

[00:00:34] Professor Paul Laursen on PubMed.

[00:03:19] Endurance athlete definition.

[00:05:00] Intensity definition.

[00:05:44] Critical Power.

[00:07:38] Aerobic threshold: 1 mmol increase in blood lactate above baseline (MAF).

[00:08:52] Critical Power: maximal lactate steady state (30-60 min).

[00:09:40] VO2 Max (2.5 min up to 8 min).

[00:10:38] Anaerobic Speed Reserve Project by Gareth Sandford.

[00:10:50] Maximal Power.

[00:12:53] 2K rowing test.

[00:17:43] More than one way to skin a cat.

[00:19:51] Continuous blood glucose monitoring.

[00:20:20] Polarised training model.

[00:21:49] Does grey zone training provide some benefit you can't get from polarised?

[00:23:13] Stress fractures.

[00:25:09] Mindfulness.

[00:26:35] Dr Daniel Plews.

[00:28:17] Training for IRONMAN.

[00:28:51] 80/20 aerobic/intensity.

[00:31:47] TrainingPeaks TSS.

[00:32:17] BANISTER, E. W. (1991). Modelling elite athletic performance. In: MacDougall, J.D.; Wenger, H.A. & Green, H.J. eds. Physiological testing of the high performance athlete. Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics Publishers Ltd., pp 403–424.

[00:32:57] TrainingPeaks Performance Management chart.

[00:34:28] Blog: Marco Altini on Heart Rate Variability (HRV).

[00:35:05] Paper: Comparison of Heart Rate Variability Recording With Smart Phone Photoplethysmographic, Polar H7 Chest Strap and Electrocardiogram Methods” by Plews DJ et al.

[00:36:41] Website: Brain.fm.

[00:37:50] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Dr Josh Turknett, MD.

[00:39:09] Overall rise in HRV in a weekly block of training.

[00:40:32] Marco Altini tweet chart.

[00:41:15] Website: HRV for Training.

[00:41:51] Dr Daniel Plews.

[00:41:59] Mark Buchet?

[00:43:20] The format of the book.

[00:44:37] Artificial Intelligence (AI).

[00:46:17] Dr Ken Ford and his publications.

[00:46:45] Podcast: STEM-Talk.

[00:46:56] Website: Plews and Prof, Plews and Prof on Twitter.

]]>
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Radical Candor™ with Dr Tommy Wood https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-06-01.at.15.36_1.mp3 Radical Candor™ is the ability to Challenge Directly and show you Care Personally at the same time. Radical Candor will help you and all the people you work with do the best work of your lives and build the best relationships of your career.

Two nearly universal experiences make Radical Candor unnatural. One, most people have been told since they learned to talk some version of “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say it at all.” When they become a boss, the very thing they have been taught not to do since they were 18 months old is suddenly their job.

Furthermore, most people, since they got their first job, have been told to be “professional.” Too often, that’s code for leaving your humanity at home. But to build strong relationships, you have to Care Personally. You have to bring your whole self to work.

Buy Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:00:29] Mastermind Talks.

[00:01:04] MMT Guests: Ben Greenfield & Dave Asprey.

[00:01:53] Carmel Valley Ranch.

[00:02:55] Jayson Gaignard

[00:05:51] Belgian Waffle Ride.

[00:06:11] Lesley Paterson & Simon Marshall at Braveheart Coaching.

[00:07:23] Book: Radical Candour by Kim Scott.

[00:07:44] Chart.

[00:08:51] Obnoxious aggression.

[00:10:55] Shit sandwich.

[00:11:21] Book: The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz.

[00:12:24] Kim Scott.

[00:16:06] Viome CEO, Naveen Jain.

[00:17:10] Catchbox.

[00:17:39] Transcriptome.

[00:18:08] Interview: Type 2 Diabetes, Fasting, Your Questions Answered with Dr Jason Fung.

[00:18:46] Interview: Why We Get Fat and What You Should Really Do About It with Chris Masterjohn, PhD and Tommy Wood, MD, PhD.

[00:19:41] Absentee hatchet job.

[00:20:28] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Dr Joshua Turknett.

[00:21:34] Video: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:23:23] Article: Should Calorie Counting Be the Main Focus for Somebody Trying to Lose Weight (Body Fat)? by Tommy Wood, MD, PhD.

[00:24:20] Tommy's Dad on PubMed.

[00:25:09] Flat tire.

[00:26:11] STEM-Talk podcast: Gary Taubes discusses low carb diets and sheds light on the hazards of sugar.

[00:27:27] Manipulative insincerity.

[00:31:33] IFM talk on insulin Buck Institute.

[00:33:21] Book: Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman by Richard P Feynman.

[00:34:04] Paper: Dominique Chretien, Paule Benit, Hyung-Ho Ha, Susanne Keipert, Riyad El-Khoury, Young-Tae Chang, Martin Jastroch, Howard Jacobs, Pierre Rustin, Malgorzata Rak. “Mitochondria Are Physiologically Maintained At Close To 50 C”.

[00:36:25] Paper: Cronise, Raymond J., David A. Sinclair, and Andrew A. Bremer. "Oxidative Priority, Meal Frequency, and the Energy Economy of Food and Activity: Implications for Longevity, Obesity, and Cardiometabolic Disease." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2016). Be sure to read Tommy’s response: Wood, Thomas. "If the Metabolic Winter Is Coming, When Will It Be Summer?" Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2017).

[00:41:48] Slack, Torea Rodriguez.

[00:44:51] Discourse forum software.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-06-01.at.15.36_1.mp3 Fri, 04 Aug 2017 09:08:24 GMT Christopher Kelly Radical Candor™ is the ability to Challenge Directly and show you Care Personally at the same time. Radical Candor will help you and all the people you work with do the best work of your lives and build the best relationships of your career.

Two nearly universal experiences make Radical Candor unnatural. One, most people have been told since they learned to talk some version of “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say it at all.” When they become a boss, the very thing they have been taught not to do since they were 18 months old is suddenly their job.

Furthermore, most people, since they got their first job, have been told to be “professional.” Too often, that’s code for leaving your humanity at home. But to build strong relationships, you have to Care Personally. You have to bring your whole self to work.

Buy Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Dr Tommy Wood:

[00:00:29] Mastermind Talks.

[00:01:04] MMT Guests: Ben Greenfield & Dave Asprey.

[00:01:53] Carmel Valley Ranch.

[00:02:55] Jayson Gaignard

[00:05:51] Belgian Waffle Ride.

[00:06:11] Lesley Paterson & Simon Marshall at Braveheart Coaching.

[00:07:23] Book: Radical Candour by Kim Scott.

[00:07:44] Chart.

[00:08:51] Obnoxious aggression.

[00:10:55] Shit sandwich.

[00:11:21] Book: The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers by Ben Horowitz.

[00:12:24] Kim Scott.

[00:16:06] Viome CEO, Naveen Jain.

[00:17:10] Catchbox.

[00:17:39] Transcriptome.

[00:18:08] Interview: Type 2 Diabetes, Fasting, Your Questions Answered with Dr Jason Fung.

[00:18:46] Interview: Why We Get Fat and What You Should Really Do About It with Chris Masterjohn, PhD and Tommy Wood, MD, PhD.

[00:19:41] Absentee hatchet job.

[00:20:28] Interview: The Migraine Miracle with Dr Joshua Turknett.

[00:21:34] Video: The Most Reliable Way to Lose Weight with Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:23:23] Article: Should Calorie Counting Be the Main Focus for Somebody Trying to Lose Weight (Body Fat)? by Tommy Wood, MD, PhD.

[00:24:20] Tommy's Dad on PubMed.

[00:25:09] Flat tire.

[00:26:11] STEM-Talk podcast: Gary Taubes discusses low carb diets and sheds light on the hazards of sugar.

[00:27:27] Manipulative insincerity.

[00:31:33] IFM talk on insulin Buck Institute.

[00:33:21] Book: Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman by Richard P Feynman.

[00:34:04] Paper: Dominique Chretien, Paule Benit, Hyung-Ho Ha, Susanne Keipert, Riyad El-Khoury, Young-Tae Chang, Martin Jastroch, Howard Jacobs, Pierre Rustin, Malgorzata Rak. “Mitochondria Are Physiologically Maintained At Close To 50 C”.

[00:36:25] Paper: Cronise, Raymond J., David A. Sinclair, and Andrew A. Bremer. "Oxidative Priority, Meal Frequency, and the Energy Economy of Food and Activity: Implications for Longevity, Obesity, and Cardiometabolic Disease." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2016). Be sure to read Tommy’s response: Wood, Thomas. "If the Metabolic Winter Is Coming, When Will It Be Summer?" Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2017).

[00:41:48] Slack, Torea Rodriguez.

[00:44:51] Discourse forum software.

]]>
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Mind Pump Simulcast https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Mind.Pump.2017.07.22.mp3 Last weekend Tommy flew from Seattle to San Jose to record with me in person for the Mind Pump podcast, and since it went so well, I thought I’d air the discussion on my show too. If you’re new to Mind Pump, I’d highly recommend you give it a listen. Sal, Justin and Adam record in a purpose-built studio and educate on all things health and fitness with an emphasis on strength, conditioning and critical thinking.

In this episode, Sal asks Tommy some great questions on food quality versus quantity. I ask Adam about the Mind Pump avatar, and the transformation people can expect from their MAPS programs. Finally, we talk about our Elite Performance Program and the types of problems we solve for our athletes. We introduce our new 7-minute Elite Performance Analysis tool.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Mind.Pump.2017.07.22.mp3 Sun, 30 Jul 2017 07:07:00 GMT Christopher Kelly Last weekend Tommy flew from Seattle to San Jose to record with me in person for the Mind Pump podcast, and since it went so well, I thought I’d air the discussion on my show too. If you’re new to Mind Pump, I’d highly recommend you give it a listen. Sal, Justin and Adam record in a purpose-built studio and educate on all things health and fitness with an emphasis on strength, conditioning and critical thinking.

In this episode, Sal asks Tommy some great questions on food quality versus quantity. I ask Adam about the Mind Pump avatar, and the transformation people can expect from their MAPS programs. Finally, we talk about our Elite Performance Program and the types of problems we solve for our athletes. We introduce our new 7-minute Elite Performance Analysis tool.

]]>
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How to Knock 3.5 Hours off Your IRONMAN Time https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Kristian.Manietta.on.2017-04-05.at.10.00.mp3 Kristian Manietta is a husband, dad, coach, coeliac, life athlete, entrepreneur and host of the Fat Black podcast. Over the past 11 years, Kristian has helped hundreds of triathletes achieve and even greatly surpass their goals using methods both traditional and unconventional… with the balance more skewed to unconventional.

I wanted to get Kristian on to talk about his incredible journey from pro snowboarder to average triathlete to sub 9-hour IRONMAN finisher. Like me and many other of my guests, Kristian has suffered from a multitude of gut problems that he now successfully manages with diet and lifestyle.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Kristian Manietta:

[00:00:06] Sign up for the Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[00:00:30] Action item to add to your routine: Be the first person to say hello.

[00:02:41] Pro snowboarding.

[00:03:54] Buying more snowboards at a shop that was offering trip to Whistler.

[00:06:45] Squamish, British Columbia.

[00:07:54] 11:27 → 8:57 IRONMAN time.

[00:10:48] Friend who was a therapist who was integral in getting through ITB injury.

[00:13:08] Grey zone training.

[00:13:30] Coach: Chris McGovern.

[00:13:45] Interview: Dr Phil Maffetone: Doctor, Coach, Author, Teacher.

[00:14:06] Site: Triathlon World Summit.

[00:18:25] Nose breathing.

[00:19:34] Too many gadgets?

[00:21:15] Scheduling volume.

[00:23:15] Swimming is the weakness.

[00:24:05] IRONMAN mass start.

[00:25:12] Interview: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:30:04] Site: TrainingPeaks.

[00:32:23] Nutrition strategies.

[00:34:45] Coeliac diagnosis.

[00:38:07] Villous Atrophy.

[00:38:53] HLA genotype.

[00:39:57] Italy.

[00:40:36] The artist formerly known as Adrenal Fatigue.

[00:40:46] MTHFR.

[00:41:59] DOMS.

[00:42:06] NBT People: Will Caterson interview.

[00:43:55] Vegan.

[00:45:02] 100k per week.

[00:48:06] Liver, sardines & bone broth.

[00:51:45] Using carbs in racing.

[00:52:17] Phat Fibre MCT oil powder.

[00:55:09] Finding the sweet spot.

[00:56:42] Podcast: Fat Black.

[00:58:40] Site: Trispecific.

[00:58:54] Facebook community: Trispecific Cafe.

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cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Kristian.Manietta.on.2017-04-05.at.10.00.mp3 Fri, 21 Jul 2017 09:07:50 GMT Christopher Kelly Kristian Manietta is a husband, dad, coach, coeliac, life athlete, entrepreneur and host of the Fat Black podcast. Over the past 11 years, Kristian has helped hundreds of triathletes achieve and even greatly surpass their goals using methods both traditional and unconventional… with the balance more skewed to unconventional.

I wanted to get Kristian on to talk about his incredible journey from pro snowboarder to average triathlete to sub 9-hour IRONMAN finisher. Like me and many other of my guests, Kristian has suffered from a multitude of gut problems that he now successfully manages with diet and lifestyle.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Kristian Manietta:

[00:00:06] Sign up for the Nourish Balance Thrive Highlights email series.

[00:00:30] Action item to add to your routine: Be the first person to say hello.

[00:02:41] Pro snowboarding.

[00:03:54] Buying more snowboards at a shop that was offering trip to Whistler.

[00:06:45] Squamish, British Columbia.

[00:07:54] 11:27 → 8:57 IRONMAN time.

[00:10:48] Friend who was a therapist who was integral in getting through ITB injury.

[00:13:08] Grey zone training.

[00:13:30] Coach: Chris McGovern.

[00:13:45] Interview: Dr Phil Maffetone: Doctor, Coach, Author, Teacher.

[00:14:06] Site: Triathlon World Summit.

[00:18:25] Nose breathing.

[00:19:34] Too many gadgets?

[00:21:15] Scheduling volume.

[00:23:15] Swimming is the weakness.

[00:24:05] IRONMAN mass start.

[00:25:12] Interview: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea with Mike T. Nelson.

[00:30:04] Site: TrainingPeaks.

[00:32:23] Nutrition strategies.

[00:34:45] Coeliac diagnosis.

[00:38:07] Villous Atrophy.

[00:38:53] HLA genotype.

[00:39:57] Italy.

[00:40:36] The artist formerly known as Adrenal Fatigue.

[00:40:46] MTHFR.

[00:41:59] DOMS.

[00:42:06] NBT People: Will Caterson interview.

[00:43:55] Vegan.

[00:45:02] 100k per week.

[00:48:06] Liver, sardines & bone broth.

[00:51:45] Using carbs in racing.

[00:52:17] Phat Fibre MCT oil powder.

[00:55:09] Finding the sweet spot.

[00:56:42] Podcast: Fat Black.

[00:58:40] Site: Trispecific.

[00:58:54] Facebook community: Trispecific Cafe.

]]>
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Off Road Triathlon World Champion Lesley Paterson on FMT and Solving Mental Conundrums https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Lesley.Paterson.on.2017-04-18.at.10.56.mp3 Three times XTERRA World Champion Lesley Paterson is the “little Scottish lassie who packs a mean punch.” In this interview, Lesley talks briefly about her early triathlon days and later success in the offroad world.

I wanted to get Lesley on for two reasons, first, because I knew she’d been working with Chris Kresser and the Taymount Clinic to resolve longstanding gut and Lyme issues. Secondly, I wanted Lesley to talk about her new book, The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion. Lesley co-authored the book with her sports psychologist husband Simon Marshall, PhD and I’d highly recommend to anyone looking to get the most out of their brain to maximise endurance.

Sorry about the swearing! My goal was not to offend. Honest.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lesley Paterson:

[00:00:00] PHAT FIBRE, Article: How to Use MCT Oil to Fuel an IRONMAN Triathlon, and, How Endurance Training Affects Carbohydrate Tolerance by Megan Roberts, MSc, and Tommy Wood MD, PhD.

[00:00:24] Interview: Lauren Peterson, PhD.

[00:00:35] YouTube: The Lesley Paterson Story by the Taymount Clinic.

[00:01:12] Site: International Triathlon Unit, or ITU racing.

[00:02:06] Site: XTERRA: Global Off-Road Triathlon and Trail Running Series.

[00:03:57] Being out in nature.

[00:04:14] Quote: “If it were easy, they'd call it IRONMAN” — Bob Babbitt.

[00:07:27] Gut issues.

[00:08:04] Antibiotics and Accutane.

[00:09:29] Weight gain.

[00:10:05] Lyme disease.

[00:10:35] 6% bodyfat.

[00:11:25] Site: Taymount Clinic.

[00:11:48] Podcast: Chris Kresser interview with Glenn Taylor of the Taymount Clinic and an Update show.

[00:13:00] Sign up for our Highlights series.

[00:14:35] Ozone and IV therapy.

[00:15:07] Interview: Dr David Minkoff.

[00:16:06] The artist formerly known as Adrenal Fatigue.

[00:16:26] Carbs.

[00:17:01] SIBO.

[00:18:10] The Taymount experience.

[00:21:05] The gut brain connection.

[00:23:25] Types of athlete at Braveheart Coaching.

[00:25:01] Site: BMC bike racing team.

[00:25:35] Professor Steve Peters.

[00:26:33] TED Talk: Optimising the Performance of the Human Mind: Steve Peters at TEDxYouth@Manchester 2012.

[00:28:06] Do you want to be having these feelings right now? If no, the chimp is in charge.

[00:29:31] Alter ego.

[00:32:46] Athlete identity issues.

[00:40:30] Race: Sea Otter Classic.

[00:42:48] Finding gratitude.

[00:44:12] Being mindful during the race.

[00:45:10] Negative thoughts.

[00:46:26] Music.

[00:48:25] Site: Braveheart Coaching.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Lesley.Paterson.on.2017-04-18.at.10.56.mp3 Thu, 13 Jul 2017 13:07:59 GMT Christopher Kelly Three times XTERRA World Champion Lesley Paterson is the “little Scottish lassie who packs a mean punch.” In this interview, Lesley talks briefly about her early triathlon days and later success in the offroad world.

I wanted to get Lesley on for two reasons, first, because I knew she’d been working with Chris Kresser and the Taymount Clinic to resolve longstanding gut and Lyme issues. Secondly, I wanted Lesley to talk about her new book, The Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion. Lesley co-authored the book with her sports psychologist husband Simon Marshall, PhD and I’d highly recommend to anyone looking to get the most out of their brain to maximise endurance.

Sorry about the swearing! My goal was not to offend. Honest.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lesley Paterson:

[00:00:00] PHAT FIBRE, Article: How to Use MCT Oil to Fuel an IRONMAN Triathlon, and, How Endurance Training Affects Carbohydrate Tolerance by Megan Roberts, MSc, and Tommy Wood MD, PhD.

[00:00:24] Interview: Lauren Peterson, PhD.

[00:00:35] YouTube: The Lesley Paterson Story by the Taymount Clinic.

[00:01:12] Site: International Triathlon Unit, or ITU racing.

[00:02:06] Site: XTERRA: Global Off-Road Triathlon and Trail Running Series.

[00:03:57] Being out in nature.

[00:04:14] Quote: “If it were easy, they'd call it IRONMAN” — Bob Babbitt.

[00:07:27] Gut issues.

[00:08:04] Antibiotics and Accutane.

[00:09:29] Weight gain.

[00:10:05] Lyme disease.

[00:10:35] 6% bodyfat.

[00:11:25] Site: Taymount Clinic.

[00:11:48] Podcast: Chris Kresser interview with Glenn Taylor of the Taymount Clinic and an Update show.

[00:13:00] Sign up for our Highlights series.

[00:14:35] Ozone and IV therapy.

[00:15:07] Interview: Dr David Minkoff.

[00:16:06] The artist formerly known as Adrenal Fatigue.

[00:16:26] Carbs.

[00:17:01] SIBO.

[00:18:10] The Taymount experience.

[00:21:05] The gut brain connection.

[00:23:25] Types of athlete at Braveheart Coaching.

[00:25:01] Site: BMC bike racing team.

[00:25:35] Professor Steve Peters.

[00:26:33] TED Talk: Optimising the Performance of the Human Mind: Steve Peters at TEDxYouth@Manchester 2012.

[00:28:06] Do you want to be having these feelings right now? If no, the chimp is in charge.

[00:29:31] Alter ego.

[00:32:46] Athlete identity issues.

[00:40:30] Race: Sea Otter Classic.

[00:42:48] Finding gratitude.

[00:44:12] Being mindful during the race.

[00:45:10] Negative thoughts.

[00:46:26] Music.

[00:48:25] Site: Braveheart Coaching.

]]>
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Abel James on the Use and Abuse of Marketing in Health and Fitness https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/fatburningman.2017.4.4.mp3 After completing high school and college in just six years, Abel James graduated as a Senior Fellow with Honors at Dartmouth College with a concentration in Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Despite some early successes in his life, in his early 20’s, Abel James found himself facing failure. Financially stressed, over-trained, over-worked, 30 lbs overweight and suffering a devastating loss due to an apartment fire, his health came crashing down and he found himself at rock bottom. As a self-proclaimed “nerd”, Abel hit the books hard and learned how to biohack himself back to health.

Now, Abel is dedicated to helping others, who’ve faced the same challenges that he did, recover their health and fitness through his New York Times bestselling book, The Wild Diet, and his award-winning web series, Fat-Burning Man. He is also a multi-instrumentalist and serial entrepreneur. Abel lives with his wife Alyson and his yellow lab, Bailey, in the mountains of Wilder, TN.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Abel James:

[00:01:14] Why do you do this work?

[00:02:59] 30 lbs overweight and the stress of an apartment fire.

[00:04:32] Honest Abe's tips.

[00:05:37] Quote: “Keeping a hundred pounds off for five years, that's special.”

[00:07:04] The importance of being a performer.

[00:08:13] Abel’s YouTube channel, including his first videos.

[00:09:00] Video version of this interview.

[00:10:00] Book: The Wild Diet: Go Beyond Paleo to Burn Fat, Beat Cravings, and Drop 20 Pounds in 40 days by Abel James.

[00:11:32] Weston A. Price Foundation.

[00:14:16] Dr Jack Kruse & Jimmy Moore.

[00:14:49] Hippy Parents, Preventing and Reversing Chronic Disease by Dr Tommy Wood at Icelandic Health Symposium 2017.

[00:15:23] Dr Deborah Gordon.

[00:16:26] A day of eating on The Wild Diet.

[00:16:58] Mark Sisson.

[00:17:36] Robb Wolf.

[00:19:36] The use and abuse of marketing in health and fitness.

[00:20:40] How do you do the diet on food stamps?

[00:21:01] Instacart in Austin.

[00:21:14] Abel’s brother James lives on a farm in Upstate NY.

[00:22:02] Working for food on local farms.

[00:22:27] 50% of Americans live from paycheck to paycheck.

[00:24:22] Social isolation.

[00:26:53] The use of humour and authenticity.

[00:28:56] Quote: “Make great content that you know is the best you can do at that moment.”

[00:29:23] Site: Wayback Machine.

[00:31:00] First book: The Musical Brain by Abel James.

[00:32:33] Hustling as a musician.

[00:34:43] What do you think the world needs more of?

[00:35:28] Book: Incorporating Herbal Medicine Into Clinical Practice by Angella Bascom, ARNP.

[00:39:03] If you had to start again, what would you do?

[00:40:02] Site: Quora.

[00:42:27] The transition into TV.

[00:44:22] ABC’s “My Diet is Better Than Yours” show featuring The Wild Diet and Abel James.

[00:46:00] Abel James doing sprints in a bacon suit on ABC’s “My Diet is Better Than Yours” show.

[00:47:33] The Annual Oxford vs Cambridge boat race. (Viking edition).

[00:49:20] Membership Site: Fat Burning Tribe.

[00:50:54] Paleo f(x).

[00:51:31] Start a community.

[00:52:59] Quote: “The hardest part is always right before the best part…”

[00:54:43] Quote: “Take on the challenges that are really appealing to you.”

[00:55:07] Album: Swamp Thing by Abel James.

[00:55:39] Site: Abel James: Author/Musician/Talk Show Host/Adventurer.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/fatburningman.2017.4.4.mp3 Thu, 06 Jul 2017 18:07:22 GMT Christopher Kelly After completing high school and college in just six years, Abel James graduated as a Senior Fellow with Honors at Dartmouth College with a concentration in Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Despite some early successes in his life, in his early 20’s, Abel James found himself facing failure. Financially stressed, over-trained, over-worked, 30 lbs overweight and suffering a devastating loss due to an apartment fire, his health came crashing down and he found himself at rock bottom. As a self-proclaimed “nerd”, Abel hit the books hard and learned how to biohack himself back to health.

Now, Abel is dedicated to helping others, who’ve faced the same challenges that he did, recover their health and fitness through his New York Times bestselling book, The Wild Diet, and his award-winning web series, Fat-Burning Man. He is also a multi-instrumentalist and serial entrepreneur. Abel lives with his wife Alyson and his yellow lab, Bailey, in the mountains of Wilder, TN.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Abel James:

[00:01:14] Why do you do this work?

[00:02:59] 30 lbs overweight and the stress of an apartment fire.

[00:04:32] Honest Abe's tips.

[00:05:37] Quote: “Keeping a hundred pounds off for five years, that's special.”

[00:07:04] The importance of being a performer.

[00:08:13] Abel’s YouTube channel, including his first videos.

[00:09:00] Video version of this interview.

[00:10:00] Book: The Wild Diet: Go Beyond Paleo to Burn Fat, Beat Cravings, and Drop 20 Pounds in 40 days by Abel James.

[00:11:32] Weston A. Price Foundation.

[00:14:16] Dr Jack Kruse & Jimmy Moore.

[00:14:49] Hippy Parents, Preventing and Reversing Chronic Disease by Dr Tommy Wood at Icelandic Health Symposium 2017.

[00:15:23] Dr Deborah Gordon.

[00:16:26] A day of eating on The Wild Diet.

[00:16:58] Mark Sisson.

[00:17:36] Robb Wolf.

[00:19:36] The use and abuse of marketing in health and fitness.

[00:20:40] How do you do the diet on food stamps?

[00:21:01] Instacart in Austin.

[00:21:14] Abel’s brother James lives on a farm in Upstate NY.

[00:22:02] Working for food on local farms.

[00:22:27] 50% of Americans live from paycheck to paycheck.

[00:24:22] Social isolation.

[00:26:53] The use of humour and authenticity.

[00:28:56] Quote: “Make great content that you know is the best you can do at that moment.”

[00:29:23] Site: Wayback Machine.

[00:31:00] First book: The Musical Brain by Abel James.

[00:32:33] Hustling as a musician.

[00:34:43] What do you think the world needs more of?

[00:35:28] Book: Incorporating Herbal Medicine Into Clinical Practice by Angella Bascom, ARNP.

[00:39:03] If you had to start again, what would you do?

[00:40:02] Site: Quora.

[00:42:27] The transition into TV.

[00:44:22] ABC’s “My Diet is Better Than Yours” show featuring The Wild Diet and Abel James.

[00:46:00] Abel James doing sprints in a bacon suit on ABC’s “My Diet is Better Than Yours” show.

[00:47:33] The Annual Oxford vs Cambridge boat race. (Viking edition).

[00:49:20] Membership Site: Fat Burning Tribe.

[00:50:54] Paleo f(x).

[00:51:31] Start a community.

[00:52:59] Quote: “The hardest part is always right before the best part…”

[00:54:43] Quote: “Take on the challenges that are really appealing to you.”

[00:55:07] Album: Swamp Thing by Abel James.

[00:55:39] Site: Abel James: Author/Musician/Talk Show Host/Adventurer.

]]>
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Creating Change in Public Health https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Sam.Feltham.on.2017-03-29.at.11.06.mp3 Sam Feltham has been in the health and fitness industry for over a decade. He started out as a party coordinator at a sports centre and worked his way up to study at the European Institute of Fitness and qualified as a Master Personal Trainer. After 5 years of running a fitness boot camp business and a successful podcast called Smash The Fat, Sam decided to move away from that business in order to fully focus on improving public health by setting up and directing the Public Health Collaboration.

In the UK, 25% of adults are obese and type 2 diabetes has risen by 65% in 10 years, both cost the NHS £16 billion a year. The Public Health Collaboration is a charity dedicated to informing and implementing healthy decisions for better public health. The PHC seeks to avert the crisis by informing healthcare professionals and the public with evidence-based reports and implementing initiatives.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Sam Feltham:

[00:00:00] Article: The Tea That Mimics the Effects of Exercise. TL;DR hormetea.com

[00:00:14] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: Creating Change in Public Health by Sam Feltham.

[00:02:57] The European Institute of Fitness.

[00:04:14] Book: Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It by Gary Taubes.

[00:04:29] Blogs: Mark Sisson and Robb Wolf.

[00:05:01] Smash The Fat Podcast and YouTube channel.

[00:05:59] Public Health Collaboration Crowdfunding.

[00:06:28] Report: Healthy Eating Guidelines & Weight Loss Advice For The United Kingdom.

[00:06:38] Public Health England’s response to Public Health Collaboration’s report: Eat Fat, Cut the Carbs and Avoid Snacking To Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:07:26] Obesity in the UK is at 25% and has been steadily increasing.

[00:07:51] In the UK, 6% of the population has type 2 diabetes and 35% have pre-diabetes costing the UK $10 billion annually.

[00:09:17] Sam's overfeeding experiment.

[00:11:09] Harris-Benedict Equation.

[00:14:33] Sleep apnoea and asthma.

[00:15:58] Bloodwork and BOD POD.

[00:17:18] Different types of fat deposition: subcutaneous vs visceral.

[00:19:16] Vegan arm of the experiment.

[00:22:09] Type 1 Diabetes.

[00:26:02] The 57 randomised controlled trials on the Public Health Collaboration website.

[00:27:44] Interview: Professor Richard Feinman.

[00:32:36] NHS spends $3 billion looking after smokers while the tax is $7 billion.

[00:34:42] Healthy Eating Guidelines mp3 and PDF.

[00:37:07] Real Food Lifestyle.

[00:38:38] Real Food Lifestyle for Weight Loss.

[00:40:24] Report: Eat Fat, Cut the Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:41:22] Website: Public Health Collaboration.

[00:42:32] PHC’s Advisory Board members include Dr Aseem Malhotra, Dr Tamsin Lewis, Dr Rangan Chatterjee, Dr David Unwin and others.  

[00:43:21] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: The Glycaemic Index: Helping Patients in Primary Care with T2D by Dr David Unwin.

[00:44:43] Public Health Collaboration Annual Conference 2017.

[00:45:08] Real Food Lifestyle General Practitioner map.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Sam.Feltham.on.2017-03-29.at.11.06.mp3 Thu, 29 Jun 2017 13:06:13 GMT Christopher Kelly Sam Feltham has been in the health and fitness industry for over a decade. He started out as a party coordinator at a sports centre and worked his way up to study at the European Institute of Fitness and qualified as a Master Personal Trainer. After 5 years of running a fitness boot camp business and a successful podcast called Smash The Fat, Sam decided to move away from that business in order to fully focus on improving public health by setting up and directing the Public Health Collaboration.

In the UK, 25% of adults are obese and type 2 diabetes has risen by 65% in 10 years, both cost the NHS £16 billion a year. The Public Health Collaboration is a charity dedicated to informing and implementing healthy decisions for better public health. The PHC seeks to avert the crisis by informing healthcare professionals and the public with evidence-based reports and implementing initiatives.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Sam Feltham:

[00:00:00] Article: The Tea That Mimics the Effects of Exercise. TL;DR hormetea.com

[00:00:14] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: Creating Change in Public Health by Sam Feltham.

[00:02:57] The European Institute of Fitness.

[00:04:14] Book: Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It by Gary Taubes.

[00:04:29] Blogs: Mark Sisson and Robb Wolf.

[00:05:01] Smash The Fat Podcast and YouTube channel.

[00:05:59] Public Health Collaboration Crowdfunding.

[00:06:28] Report: Healthy Eating Guidelines & Weight Loss Advice For The United Kingdom.

[00:06:38] Public Health England’s response to Public Health Collaboration’s report: Eat Fat, Cut the Carbs and Avoid Snacking To Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:07:26] Obesity in the UK is at 25% and has been steadily increasing.

[00:07:51] In the UK, 6% of the population has type 2 diabetes and 35% have pre-diabetes costing the UK $10 billion annually.

[00:09:17] Sam's overfeeding experiment.

[00:11:09] Harris-Benedict Equation.

[00:14:33] Sleep apnoea and asthma.

[00:15:58] Bloodwork and BOD POD.

[00:17:18] Different types of fat deposition: subcutaneous vs visceral.

[00:19:16] Vegan arm of the experiment.

[00:22:09] Type 1 Diabetes.

[00:26:02] The 57 randomised controlled trials on the Public Health Collaboration website.

[00:27:44] Interview: Professor Richard Feinman.

[00:32:36] NHS spends $3 billion looking after smokers while the tax is $7 billion.

[00:34:42] Healthy Eating Guidelines mp3 and PDF.

[00:37:07] Real Food Lifestyle.

[00:38:38] Real Food Lifestyle for Weight Loss.

[00:40:24] Report: Eat Fat, Cut the Carbs and Avoid Snacking to Reverse Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

[00:41:22] Website: Public Health Collaboration.

[00:42:32] PHC’s Advisory Board members include Dr Aseem Malhotra, Dr Tamsin Lewis, Dr Rangan Chatterjee, Dr David Unwin and others.  

[00:43:21] Presentation: Low Carb Breckenridge 2017: The Glycaemic Index: Helping Patients in Primary Care with T2D by Dr David Unwin.

[00:44:43] Public Health Collaboration Annual Conference 2017.

[00:45:08] Real Food Lifestyle General Practitioner map.

]]>
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Why Your Diet Isn’t Working: Under Eating and Overtraining https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Megan.Hall.on.2017-04-11.at.10.40.mp3 As Scientific Director at Nourish Balance Thrive, Megan is a research scientist who helps keep the program state of the art. She received her BS in Exercise Biology and MSc in Nutritional Biology at UC Davis where her research focused on the effects of low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets on longevity and healthspan in mice. In her free time Megan enjoys reading, long walks in the sunshine, weight lifting, martial arts, and hiking in the Colorado mountains.

You could listen to this interview to learn:

  • How Megan recovered her gut health.
  • The best diet to gain lean mass (for the underweight).
  • About allostatic load.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Megan Roberts:

[00:01:14] IHH-UCSF Symposium on Functional Medicine and the Paleo Approach.

[00:01:30] Presentations: Robb Wolf, Dr Stephan Guyenet, Dr Justin Sonnenburg.

[00:02:55] The road to medical school.

[00:03:14] Blog post: Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling and Overtraining.

[00:04:34] Integrating all the information.

[00:04:59] Dr Ron Rosedale, Dr Dominic D'Agostino.

[00:06:43] Allostatic load aka, "the stress bucket".

[00:07:40] Gluten and dairy sensitivities.

[00:08:01] Presentation: Dr Tommy Wood at Icelandic Health Symposium.

[00:08:39] White blood cell counts and getting sick.

[00:10:03] Book: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers by Dr Robert Sapolsky.

[00:12:33] Favouring micronutrients over macronutrients.

[00:14:05] Learning to be mindful.

[00:14:51] Interview: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, Faster with Dr Ellen Langer.

[00:15:52] Presentation: The Way to the Man's Heart Is Through the Stomach, Dr Tommy Wood.

[00:16:16] Blog post: How to Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) on a Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet.

[00:16:52] Sumo wrestlers.

[00:17:12] Interview: Keto Summit with Dr Chris Masterjohn.

[00:18:22] Interview: How to Achieve High Intensity Health with Mike Mutzel.

[00:19:07] Interview: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:20:46] Headspace.

[00:23:59] Critical thinking and seeing shades of grey.

[00:25:05] Timing carb intake.

[00:26:34] Adapting to altitude in Colorado.

[00:28:01] Will the ketogenic diet extend longevity?

[00:28:25] The limitations of rodent studies.

[00:29:30] Gender differences for the ketogenic diet.

[00:29:59] Blog Post: The IRONMAN Guide to Ketosis.

[00:32:50] Ben Greenfield's experience on a ketogenic diet.

[00:33:06] Dr Mark Cucuzzella, Zach Bitter.

[00:34:56] Interview: How to Use Biomedical Testing for IRONMAN Performance with Bob McRae.

[00:35:10] Blog post: How to Use MCT Oil to Fuel an IRONMAN Triathlon, and, How Endurance Training Affects Carbohydrate Tolerance.

[00:36:12] PHAT FIBRE v2.

[00:37:39] Blog post: Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling and Overtraining.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Megan.Hall.on.2017-04-11.at.10.40.mp3 Thu, 22 Jun 2017 11:06:19 GMT Christopher Kelly As Scientific Director at Nourish Balance Thrive, Megan is a research scientist who helps keep the program state of the art. She received her BS in Exercise Biology and MSc in Nutritional Biology at UC Davis where her research focused on the effects of low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets on longevity and healthspan in mice. In her free time Megan enjoys reading, long walks in the sunshine, weight lifting, martial arts, and hiking in the Colorado mountains.

You could listen to this interview to learn:

  • How Megan recovered her gut health.
  • The best diet to gain lean mass (for the underweight).
  • About allostatic load.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Megan Roberts:

[00:01:14] IHH-UCSF Symposium on Functional Medicine and the Paleo Approach.

[00:01:30] Presentations: Robb Wolf, Dr Stephan Guyenet, Dr Justin Sonnenburg.

[00:02:55] The road to medical school.

[00:03:14] Blog post: Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling and Overtraining.

[00:04:34] Integrating all the information.

[00:04:59] Dr Ron Rosedale, Dr Dominic D'Agostino.

[00:06:43] Allostatic load aka, "the stress bucket".

[00:07:40] Gluten and dairy sensitivities.

[00:08:01] Presentation: Dr Tommy Wood at Icelandic Health Symposium.

[00:08:39] White blood cell counts and getting sick.

[00:10:03] Book: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers by Dr Robert Sapolsky.

[00:12:33] Favouring micronutrients over macronutrients.

[00:14:05] Learning to be mindful.

[00:14:51] Interview: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, Faster with Dr Ellen Langer.

[00:15:52] Presentation: The Way to the Man's Heart Is Through the Stomach, Dr Tommy Wood.

[00:16:16] Blog post: How to Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) on a Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet.

[00:16:52] Sumo wrestlers.

[00:17:12] Interview: Keto Summit with Dr Chris Masterjohn.

[00:18:22] Interview: How to Achieve High Intensity Health with Mike Mutzel.

[00:19:07] Interview: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About with Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:20:46] Headspace.

[00:23:59] Critical thinking and seeing shades of grey.

[00:25:05] Timing carb intake.

[00:26:34] Adapting to altitude in Colorado.

[00:28:01] Will the ketogenic diet extend longevity?

[00:28:25] The limitations of rodent studies.

[00:29:30] Gender differences for the ketogenic diet.

[00:29:59] Blog Post: The IRONMAN Guide to Ketosis.

[00:32:50] Ben Greenfield's experience on a ketogenic diet.

[00:33:06] Dr Mark Cucuzzella, Zach Bitter.

[00:34:56] Interview: How to Use Biomedical Testing for IRONMAN Performance with Bob McRae.

[00:35:10] Blog post: How to Use MCT Oil to Fuel an IRONMAN Triathlon, and, How Endurance Training Affects Carbohydrate Tolerance.

[00:36:12] PHAT FIBRE v2.

[00:37:39] Blog post: Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling and Overtraining.

]]>
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The Migraine Miracle https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Josh.Turknett.on.2017-05-17.at.10.35.mp3 Find your path to a migraine-free life in the “Ultimate Guide” by headache expert, best-selling author, and longtime migraine sufferer, Dr Joshua Turknett, MD.

After receiving his Bachelor’s Degree in Neuroscience from Wesleyan University and his Medical Degree from Emory University, he went on to neurology residency training for four years at Shands Hospital at the University of Florida. Josh has been practicing neurology in the Atlanta, Georgia area since 2005.

As a migraine sufferer, Josh takes great satisfaction in helping fellow migraineurs take control of their headaches. Josh has a special interest in the role of nutrition and lifestyle in neurological illness. He blogs on these subjects and more and has also authored a best-selling book called The Migraine Miracle.

Outside of his professional life, Josh enjoys playing a wide range of sports and string instruments with a special fondness for both tennis and the 5-string banjo. His love for the 5-string banjo has developed into several notable endeavours including an album of banjo music for children, and an online learning company called Brainjo, where he teaches people how to play the banjo and create a musical brain by hacking the science of neuroplasticity.

Some of my favourite Josh quotes:

“Seduced by our powers of reductionism”

“Just play the game!”

Here’s the outline of this interview with Josh Turknett, MD:

[00:00:15] Ancestral Health Symposium 2014 talk - Migraine as the Hypothalamic Distress Signal.

[00:00:54] Josh's migraine story.

[00:03:00] Book: The Migraine Miracle.

[00:03:29] Migraine symptoms.

[00:06:15] Warning signs: prodrome.

[00:06:55] Aura phenomenon.

[00:07:53] 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men suffer from migraines.

[00:09:00] Standard of care - drugs.

[00:10:37] Triptans.

[00:12:12] Causes of migraines.

[00:13:06] Distress signal of an overwhelmed hypothalamus.

[00:14:52] Sleep and circadian rhythms.

[00:15:03] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:17:00] Reactive hypoglycaemia.

[00:17:48] The migraine threshold chart.

[00:18:30] Inflammation.

[00:20:54] Obesity and migraines.

[00:23:15] Physicians for Ancestral Health 2017 talk - “How to Win at Angry Birds: Moving Towards a More Efficient Practice Model” Josh Turknett, MD.

[00:25:03] “Seduced by our powers of reductionism” -- Josh Turknett, MD

[00:30:15] The best diet for migraineurs.

[00:31:50] Ketogenic diets.

[00:32:24] Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello, et al. "Effects of short-term and long-term treatment with medium-and long-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet on cortical spreading depression in young rats." Neuroscience letters 434.1 (2008): 66-70.

[00:34:02] The Three Pillars: Eliminate Rebound, Eliminate Mismatch, Establish Metabolic Flexibility.

[00:36:08] Gut symptoms: blog post.

[00:36:53] eBook: The Ultimate Guide.

[00:37:52] Support group: Facebook group and meal plans Primal Provisions.

[00:38:32] Support group: Migrai-Neverland.

[00:39:08] The wall of inspiration.

[00:40:23] Teaching the banjo: Brainjo.

[00:41:45] Gourd banjo. Also see, Why the Banjo is Best.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Josh.Turknett.on.2017-05-17.at.10.35.mp3 Thu, 15 Jun 2017 10:06:26 GMT Christopher Kelly Find your path to a migraine-free life in the “Ultimate Guide” by headache expert, best-selling author, and longtime migraine sufferer, Dr Joshua Turknett, MD.

After receiving his Bachelor’s Degree in Neuroscience from Wesleyan University and his Medical Degree from Emory University, he went on to neurology residency training for four years at Shands Hospital at the University of Florida. Josh has been practicing neurology in the Atlanta, Georgia area since 2005.

As a migraine sufferer, Josh takes great satisfaction in helping fellow migraineurs take control of their headaches. Josh has a special interest in the role of nutrition and lifestyle in neurological illness. He blogs on these subjects and more and has also authored a best-selling book called The Migraine Miracle.

Outside of his professional life, Josh enjoys playing a wide range of sports and string instruments with a special fondness for both tennis and the 5-string banjo. His love for the 5-string banjo has developed into several notable endeavours including an album of banjo music for children, and an online learning company called Brainjo, where he teaches people how to play the banjo and create a musical brain by hacking the science of neuroplasticity.

Some of my favourite Josh quotes:

“Seduced by our powers of reductionism”

“Just play the game!”

Here’s the outline of this interview with Josh Turknett, MD:

[00:00:15] Ancestral Health Symposium 2014 talk - Migraine as the Hypothalamic Distress Signal.

[00:00:54] Josh's migraine story.

[00:03:00] Book: The Migraine Miracle.

[00:03:29] Migraine symptoms.

[00:06:15] Warning signs: prodrome.

[00:06:55] Aura phenomenon.

[00:07:53] 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10 men suffer from migraines.

[00:09:00] Standard of care - drugs.

[00:10:37] Triptans.

[00:12:12] Causes of migraines.

[00:13:06] Distress signal of an overwhelmed hypothalamus.

[00:14:52] Sleep and circadian rhythms.

[00:15:03] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:17:00] Reactive hypoglycaemia.

[00:17:48] The migraine threshold chart.

[00:18:30] Inflammation.

[00:20:54] Obesity and migraines.

[00:23:15] Physicians for Ancestral Health 2017 talk - “How to Win at Angry Birds: Moving Towards a More Efficient Practice Model” Josh Turknett, MD.

[00:25:03] “Seduced by our powers of reductionism” -- Josh Turknett, MD

[00:30:15] The best diet for migraineurs.

[00:31:50] Ketogenic diets.

[00:32:24] Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello, et al. "Effects of short-term and long-term treatment with medium-and long-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet on cortical spreading depression in young rats." Neuroscience letters 434.1 (2008): 66-70.

[00:34:02] The Three Pillars: Eliminate Rebound, Eliminate Mismatch, Establish Metabolic Flexibility.

[00:36:08] Gut symptoms: blog post.

[00:36:53] eBook: The Ultimate Guide.

[00:37:52] Support group: Facebook group and meal plans Primal Provisions.

[00:38:32] Support group: Migrai-Neverland.

[00:39:08] The wall of inspiration.

[00:40:23] Teaching the banjo: Brainjo.

[00:41:45] Gourd banjo. Also see, Why the Banjo is Best.

]]>
clean
Learning to Learn with Jonathan Levi https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jonathan.Levi.on.2017-05-01.at.08.00.mp3 Jonathan Levi is an experienced entrepreneur and angel investor from Silicon Valley.

After successfully selling his Inc 5,000 rated startup in April of 2011, Jonathan enlisted the help of speed-reading expert and university professor Anna Goldentouch, who tutored him in speed-reading, advanced memorization, and more. He saw incredible results while earning his MBA from INSEAD, and later went on to teach a best-selling online course on the subject. With this unique skill, Jonathan has become a proficient life hacker, optimising and “hacking” such processes as travel, sleep, language learning, and fitness.

I recently had the privilege of featuring as a guest on Jonathan’s Becoming Superhuman podcast where we talk about an engineering approaching to creating health versus the medical approach for episodic illness.

You could listen to this podcast to find out why and how to become a better learner. After all, “learning is the only skill that matters.”--Jonathan Levi.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jonathan Levi:

[00:00:35] Becoming Superhuman podcast.

[00:00:44] Podcast with Robb Wolf.

[00:01:24] Problems learning in an academic setting.

[00:01:55] ADD.

[00:02:34] Unhappy adolescence.

[00:02:49] Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin).

[00:03:51] MBA program.

[00:04:46] Professor Anna and Dr Lev Goldentouch.

[00:06:15] Ted Talk: What If Schools Taught Us How To Learn?

[00:07:12] Humans have a heavy preference for visual learning.

[00:07:32] Newtonian physics.

[00:09:10] Dr Ben Lynch, ND.

[00:09:25] Organic acids testing, dopamine and tyrosine.

[00:10:11] Learning is the only skill that matters.

[00:10:26] Book: Becoming a Supple Leopard by Kelly Starrett.

[00:10:42] Book: The Game by Neil Strauss.

[00:11:12] Keto for brain health, fasting.

[00:11:42] Magnesium deficiency.

[00:12:09] Movement & exercise, norepinephrine.

[00:13:19] Machine learning.

[00:14:08] Book: Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman!

[00:14:56] Harry Lorayne.

[00:15:07] Steve Jobs.

[00:16:18] Debating.

[00:19:18] Udemy.

[00:22:31] Book: Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer.

[00:25:37] Method of loci.

[00:26:04] Neurons & synapses.

[00:27:20] Hippocampus.

[00:28:59] 5-HT4 serotonin receptor.

[00:30:00] Book: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.

[00:30:32] Ron White memory champion.

[00:31:34] Anki flashcard software.

[00:33:16] PageRank.

[00:34:02] Clarke, Robert, et al. "Effects of homocysteine lowering with B vitamins on cognitive aging: meta-analysis of 11 trials with cognitive data on 22,000 individuals." The American journal of clinical nutrition 100.2 (2014): 657-666.

[00:34:24] Spritzlet.

[00:35:25] Evelyn Wood speed reading technique.

[00:35:52] Pre-reading.

[00:37:08] “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”--Abraham Lincoln.

[00:38:39] The visual abstract.

[00:40:27] Caring about the thing that you're trying to remember.

[00:40:50] AcroYoga.

[00:43:21] Malcolm Knowles.

[00:43:58] Book: The China Study by T. Colin Campbell and Denise Minger rebuttal.

[00:46:17] Become a SuperHuman: Naturally & Safely Boost Testosterone.

[00:47:12] jle.vi/drugs

[00:47:37] Sam Harris.

[00:47:50] jle.vi/kombucha

[00:48:13] Book: Stealing Fire by Steven Kotler.

[00:49:39] Funktion-One sound system.

[00:50:55] Meditation.

[00:51:54] Modulating cortisol response.

[00:53:17] becomeasuperlearner.com

[00:53:42] becomingasuperhuman.com

[00:54:49] Wim Hof.

[00:55:38] Dr Bryan Walsh, ND.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jonathan.Levi.on.2017-05-01.at.08.00.mp3 Thu, 08 Jun 2017 11:06:52 GMT Christopher Kelly Jonathan Levi is an experienced entrepreneur and angel investor from Silicon Valley.

After successfully selling his Inc 5,000 rated startup in April of 2011, Jonathan enlisted the help of speed-reading expert and university professor Anna Goldentouch, who tutored him in speed-reading, advanced memorization, and more. He saw incredible results while earning his MBA from INSEAD, and later went on to teach a best-selling online course on the subject. With this unique skill, Jonathan has become a proficient life hacker, optimising and “hacking” such processes as travel, sleep, language learning, and fitness.

I recently had the privilege of featuring as a guest on Jonathan’s Becoming Superhuman podcast where we talk about an engineering approaching to creating health versus the medical approach for episodic illness.

You could listen to this podcast to find out why and how to become a better learner. After all, “learning is the only skill that matters.”--Jonathan Levi.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jonathan Levi:

[00:00:35] Becoming Superhuman podcast.

[00:00:44] Podcast with Robb Wolf.

[00:01:24] Problems learning in an academic setting.

[00:01:55] ADD.

[00:02:34] Unhappy adolescence.

[00:02:49] Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin).

[00:03:51] MBA program.

[00:04:46] Professor Anna and Dr Lev Goldentouch.

[00:06:15] Ted Talk: What If Schools Taught Us How To Learn?

[00:07:12] Humans have a heavy preference for visual learning.

[00:07:32] Newtonian physics.

[00:09:10] Dr Ben Lynch, ND.

[00:09:25] Organic acids testing, dopamine and tyrosine.

[00:10:11] Learning is the only skill that matters.

[00:10:26] Book: Becoming a Supple Leopard by Kelly Starrett.

[00:10:42] Book: The Game by Neil Strauss.

[00:11:12] Keto for brain health, fasting.

[00:11:42] Magnesium deficiency.

[00:12:09] Movement & exercise, norepinephrine.

[00:13:19] Machine learning.

[00:14:08] Book: Surely You're Joking, Mr Feynman!

[00:14:56] Harry Lorayne.

[00:15:07] Steve Jobs.

[00:16:18] Debating.

[00:19:18] Udemy.

[00:22:31] Book: Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer.

[00:25:37] Method of loci.

[00:26:04] Neurons & synapses.

[00:27:20] Hippocampus.

[00:28:59] 5-HT4 serotonin receptor.

[00:30:00] Book: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.

[00:30:32] Ron White memory champion.

[00:31:34] Anki flashcard software.

[00:33:16] PageRank.

[00:34:02] Clarke, Robert, et al. "Effects of homocysteine lowering with B vitamins on cognitive aging: meta-analysis of 11 trials with cognitive data on 22,000 individuals." The American journal of clinical nutrition 100.2 (2014): 657-666.

[00:34:24] Spritzlet.

[00:35:25] Evelyn Wood speed reading technique.

[00:35:52] Pre-reading.

[00:37:08] “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”--Abraham Lincoln.

[00:38:39] The visual abstract.

[00:40:27] Caring about the thing that you're trying to remember.

[00:40:50] AcroYoga.

[00:43:21] Malcolm Knowles.

[00:43:58] Book: The China Study by T. Colin Campbell and Denise Minger rebuttal.

[00:46:17] Become a SuperHuman: Naturally & Safely Boost Testosterone.

[00:47:12] jle.vi/drugs

[00:47:37] Sam Harris.

[00:47:50] jle.vi/kombucha

[00:48:13] Book: Stealing Fire by Steven Kotler.

[00:49:39] Funktion-One sound system.

[00:50:55] Meditation.

[00:51:54] Modulating cortisol response.

[00:53:17] becomeasuperlearner.com

[00:53:42] becomingasuperhuman.com

[00:54:49] Wim Hof.

[00:55:38] Dr Bryan Walsh, ND.

]]>
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The Hungry Brain with Stephan Guyenet, PhD https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Stephan.Guyenet.on.2017-04-12.at.11.03.mp3 No one wants to overeat. And certainly no one wants to overeat for years, become overweight, and end up with a high risk of diabetes or heart disease– yet two-thirds of Americans do precisely that. In his book The Hungry Brain, Stephan J. Guyenet, PhD argues that the problem is not necessarily a lack of willpower or an incorrect understanding of what to eat. Rather, our appetites and food choices are led astray by ancient, instinctive brain circuits that play by the rules of a survival game that no longer exists. And these circuits don’t care about how you look in a bathing suit next summer.

After earning a BS in biochemistry at the University of Virginia, Stephan pursued a PhD in neuroscience at the University of Washington, then continued doing research as a postdoctoral fellow. He spent a total of 12 years in the neuroscience research world studying neurodegenerative disease and the neuroscience of eating behaviour and obesity. His publications in scientific journals have been cited over 1,400 times by his peers.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Stephan Guyenet:

[00:01:01] Bland Food Cookbook.

[00:01:57] Book: Wired to Eat, Book: The Case Against Sugar.

[00:03:30] Neuroregulation of appetite.

[00:05:04] How the brain makes decisions.

[00:07:30] The Hungry Brain is for everyone.

[00:09:51] How complete is the book?

[00:11:31] Is it compatible with Taubes’s work?

[00:14:38] Book: The Potato Hack.

[00:15:40] Washington Potato Commission Leader Goes On All-Potato Diet.

[00:15:56] Spud Fit guy.

[00:16:40] Podcast with Ellen Langer: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster.

[00:17:06] Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. "Mind-set matters exercise and the placebo effect." Psychological Science 18.2 (2007): 165-171.

[00:19:24] Leptin, CCK, GLP-1.

[00:20:08] Bariatric surgery,

[00:22:36] Food preferences originate in the brain.

[00:24:47] Glucose homoeostasis.

[00:26:22] Steven, Sarah, et al. "Very low-calorie diet and 6 months of weight stability in type 2 diabetes: pathophysiological changes in responders and nonresponders." Diabetes Care 39.5 (2016): 808-815.

[00:27:30] Dopamine: the learning chemical.

[00:27:45] David Silver's Reinforcement Learning course.

[00:33:20] Robert Sapolsky Dopamine Jackpot video.

[00:34:07] Nose poking (optogenetics) experiment.

[00:34:48] Light-activated ion channels.

[00:38:08] Drug addiction

[00:39:18] Book: The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World.

[00:41:50] Prescription for athletes looking to improve their body composition.

[00:42:37] Effort barriers.

[00:44:08] Satiety is generated by the brain based on what's going on in the GI tract.

[00:45:51] Water, fibre, and protein create satiety.

[00:46:13] Palatability.

[00:48:28] First interview: Leptin and Hyperpalatable Foods with Stephan Guyenet.

[00:49:09] Theobromine.

[00:51:22] Book: The Hungry Brain.

[00:51:27] stephanguyenet.com and wholehealthsource.org.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Stephan.Guyenet.on.2017-04-12.at.11.03.mp3 Thu, 01 Jun 2017 18:06:12 GMT Christopher Kelly No one wants to overeat. And certainly no one wants to overeat for years, become overweight, and end up with a high risk of diabetes or heart disease– yet two-thirds of Americans do precisely that. In his book The Hungry Brain, Stephan J. Guyenet, PhD argues that the problem is not necessarily a lack of willpower or an incorrect understanding of what to eat. Rather, our appetites and food choices are led astray by ancient, instinctive brain circuits that play by the rules of a survival game that no longer exists. And these circuits don’t care about how you look in a bathing suit next summer.

After earning a BS in biochemistry at the University of Virginia, Stephan pursued a PhD in neuroscience at the University of Washington, then continued doing research as a postdoctoral fellow. He spent a total of 12 years in the neuroscience research world studying neurodegenerative disease and the neuroscience of eating behaviour and obesity. His publications in scientific journals have been cited over 1,400 times by his peers.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Stephan Guyenet:

[00:01:01] Bland Food Cookbook.

[00:01:57] Book: Wired to Eat, Book: The Case Against Sugar.

[00:03:30] Neuroregulation of appetite.

[00:05:04] How the brain makes decisions.

[00:07:30] The Hungry Brain is for everyone.

[00:09:51] How complete is the book?

[00:11:31] Is it compatible with Taubes’s work?

[00:14:38] Book: The Potato Hack.

[00:15:40] Washington Potato Commission Leader Goes On All-Potato Diet.

[00:15:56] Spud Fit guy.

[00:16:40] Podcast with Ellen Langer: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster.

[00:17:06] Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. "Mind-set matters exercise and the placebo effect." Psychological Science 18.2 (2007): 165-171.

[00:19:24] Leptin, CCK, GLP-1.

[00:20:08] Bariatric surgery,

[00:22:36] Food preferences originate in the brain.

[00:24:47] Glucose homoeostasis.

[00:26:22] Steven, Sarah, et al. "Very low-calorie diet and 6 months of weight stability in type 2 diabetes: pathophysiological changes in responders and nonresponders." Diabetes Care 39.5 (2016): 808-815.

[00:27:30] Dopamine: the learning chemical.

[00:27:45] David Silver's Reinforcement Learning course.

[00:33:20] Robert Sapolsky Dopamine Jackpot video.

[00:34:07] Nose poking (optogenetics) experiment.

[00:34:48] Light-activated ion channels.

[00:38:08] Drug addiction

[00:39:18] Book: The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World.

[00:41:50] Prescription for athletes looking to improve their body composition.

[00:42:37] Effort barriers.

[00:44:08] Satiety is generated by the brain based on what's going on in the GI tract.

[00:45:51] Water, fibre, and protein create satiety.

[00:46:13] Palatability.

[00:48:28] First interview: Leptin and Hyperpalatable Foods with Stephan Guyenet.

[00:49:09] Theobromine.

[00:51:22] Book: The Hungry Brain.

[00:51:27] stephanguyenet.com and wholehealthsource.org.

]]>
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Nick Runs America: 5,400 Km in 100 Days https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Dr.Nicholas.J.Ashill.on.2017-05-02.at.10.31.mp3 Nick J. Ashill is a British Professor of Marketing at the American University of Sharjah. Nick is a former international hockey player now turned ultra endurance athlete, having competed in the Marathon des Sables, London to Brighton and the Comrades in South Africa.

At the time of writing, Nick is running 5,400 km across Transcontinental America from west to east and in doing so raise awareness and funds for the Pulmonary Fibrosis Trust.

You could listen to this podcast to find out about how Nick transitioned from a high-carb to high-fat diet to quicken recovery and reduce inflammation. Nick also talks about his training, hydration and supplementation strategy.

Follow Nick on his adventure over at www.nickrunsamerica.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Nick Ashill:

[00:00:49] Rugby: New Zealand vs Wales.

[00:01:03] Pulmonary Fibrosis Trust.

[00:02:32] Marathon des Sables.

[00:03:51] London 2 Brighton Challenge.

[00:04:02] Comrades Marathon.

[00:05:29] Transitioning from a high-carb to a high-fat diet.

[00:07:24] Weight loss on keto.

[00:08:04] Improved recovery.

[00:08:59] The training plan.

[00:10:32] 350 km per week!

[00:11:22] The record is 43 days.

[00:12:30] 50 km per day during the trans-America attempt.

[00:13:35] What might go wrong?

[00:14:30] Physical security on Route 66.

[00:16:17] Hydration plan.

[00:16:42] FITNESSFUEL.

[00:17:52] The dangers of overhydration. See my podcast with Prof. Tim Noakes.

[00:18:43] Coconut oil, avocado, chicken, fish, broccoli.

[00:19:27] Sweet potato and butter.

[00:20:16] PharmaNAC, EnteroMend and probiotics.

[00:21:33] Magnesium, Zinc.

[00:22:11] Cramping is gone!

[00:23:23] nickrunsamerica.com

[00:23:32] You can follow Nick on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

[00:23:55] Filming.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Dr.Nicholas.J.Ashill.on.2017-05-02.at.10.31.mp3 Thu, 18 May 2017 09:05:28 GMT Christopher Kelly Nick J. Ashill is a British Professor of Marketing at the American University of Sharjah. Nick is a former international hockey player now turned ultra endurance athlete, having competed in the Marathon des Sables, London to Brighton and the Comrades in South Africa.

At the time of writing, Nick is running 5,400 km across Transcontinental America from west to east and in doing so raise awareness and funds for the Pulmonary Fibrosis Trust.

You could listen to this podcast to find out about how Nick transitioned from a high-carb to high-fat diet to quicken recovery and reduce inflammation. Nick also talks about his training, hydration and supplementation strategy.

Follow Nick on his adventure over at www.nickrunsamerica.com

Here’s the outline of this interview with Nick Ashill:

[00:00:49] Rugby: New Zealand vs Wales.

[00:01:03] Pulmonary Fibrosis Trust.

[00:02:32] Marathon des Sables.

[00:03:51] London 2 Brighton Challenge.

[00:04:02] Comrades Marathon.

[00:05:29] Transitioning from a high-carb to a high-fat diet.

[00:07:24] Weight loss on keto.

[00:08:04] Improved recovery.

[00:08:59] The training plan.

[00:10:32] 350 km per week!

[00:11:22] The record is 43 days.

[00:12:30] 50 km per day during the trans-America attempt.

[00:13:35] What might go wrong?

[00:14:30] Physical security on Route 66.

[00:16:17] Hydration plan.

[00:16:42] FITNESSFUEL.

[00:17:52] The dangers of overhydration. See my podcast with Prof. Tim Noakes.

[00:18:43] Coconut oil, avocado, chicken, fish, broccoli.

[00:19:27] Sweet potato and butter.

[00:20:16] PharmaNAC, EnteroMend and probiotics.

[00:21:33] Magnesium, Zinc.

[00:22:11] Cramping is gone!

[00:23:23] nickrunsamerica.com

[00:23:32] You can follow Nick on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

[00:23:55] Filming.

]]>
clean
Hormesis, Nootropics and Organic Acids Testing https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-04-10.at.17.33.mp3 In this dense and technical episode with Dr Tommy Wood, we introduce Hormetea!

Why Hormetea?

We love polyphenols - those magical compounds from plant foods that lend them their bright colours and multiple health benefits. The greens and yellows in tea, the deep orange of turmeric, and purples of berries. Many of these compounds provide some of their benefits by activating the metabolic machinery associated with fasting and autophagy - a process known as hormesis. To get all these great compounds in one place, we went into the kitchen and cooked up a tea - Hormetea. In one serving, you’ll find the best-researched plant polyphenols in doses that have been clinically-proven to reduce inflammation and improve metabolic health, with a touch of pepper to increase bioavailability. We’re sure you’re going to love it!

We will send the first 100 people that leave us a 5-star review on iTunes (video instructions) a 50g sample of Hormetea. Please send your US shipping address to support@nourishbalancethrive.com

About the Hormetea ingredients:

Polyphenols

Matcha - green tea catechins

Grape seed extract

Turmeric

Broccoli seeds

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Tommy Wood, MD, PhD:

[00:00:29] Icelandic Health Symposium. Tommy's talk from last year’s event.

[00:02:25] This year’s event is called Who Wants to Live Forever.

[00:02:41] Maryanne DeMasi was last year’s host, this year it’s Tommy!

[00:02:55] Speakers: Ben Greenfield, Dr Bryan Walsh, Diana Rogers, Dr Dominic D’Agostino, Dr Doug McGuff, Dr Rangan Chatterjee, Dr Satchidananda Panda.

[00:03:49] Speaker dinner.

[00:03:58] Practitioner workshop.

[00:04:59] Mountain biking in Iceland.

[00:05:18] PHAT FIBRE, Wood, Thomas R., and Christopher Kelly. "Insulin, glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate responses to a medium-chain triglyceride-based sports supplement: A pilot study." Journal of Insulin Resistance 2.1 (2017): 9.

[00:06:46] PFv2 is more ketogenic (C8 oil).

[00:07:01] Some glucose is required even in low-carb athletes.

[00:07:37] Professor Kieran Clarke.

[00:09:06] Testing nutritional supplements.

[00:10:10] Professor Elizabeth Nance.

[00:10:48] Hormetea.

[00:11:14] Hormesis.

[00:11:32] Plant polyphenols.

[00:12:03] Rhonda Patrick, PhD.

[00:13:28] Anthocyanins.

[00:13:53] Root causes of MS talk.

[00:16:02] Berries at the farmer's market.

[00:16:53] Frozen berries can be found online.

[00:17:19] Matcha green tea.

[00:18:52] Grapeseed extract (not grapefruit seed extract).

[00:20:38] Turmeric.

[00:21:33] Meriva.

[00:22:33] Broccoli sprouts.

[00:24:03] Morning smoothie.

[00:24:14] NRf2.

[00:26:18] Hormesis in the metabolically deranged.

[00:27:09] 8-hydroxy-2' -deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG).

[00:28:12] Hormetea preparation instructions.

[00:29:27] Video instructions for review.

[00:31:57] Organic acids test (OAT).

[00:32:24] Podcast: Bill Shaw, PhD.

[00:33:35] Tommy's results: before and after.

[00:33:46] Qualia (we have no financial affiliation).

[00:35:21] PhD defence.

[00:36:07] Acute stimulation then a come down.

[00:38:23] MOA dopamine.

[00:40:05] Professor Robert Sapolsky dopamine video.

[00:42:05] Noradrenaline (because there ain’t no receptor for norepinephrine).

[00:43:10] Serotonin.

[00:44:28] Kyurinate and quinolinate.

[00:44:56] 5-HTP

[00:47:30] Book a free EPP Starter Session.

[00:48:43] Model of encephalopathy of prematurity at the University of Washington.

[00:53:53] Sign up for our Highlights email.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-04-10.at.17.33.mp3 Thu, 11 May 2017 12:05:17 GMT Christopher Kelly In this dense and technical episode with Dr Tommy Wood, we introduce Hormetea!

Why Hormetea?

We love polyphenols - those magical compounds from plant foods that lend them their bright colours and multiple health benefits. The greens and yellows in tea, the deep orange of turmeric, and purples of berries. Many of these compounds provide some of their benefits by activating the metabolic machinery associated with fasting and autophagy - a process known as hormesis. To get all these great compounds in one place, we went into the kitchen and cooked up a tea - Hormetea. In one serving, you’ll find the best-researched plant polyphenols in doses that have been clinically-proven to reduce inflammation and improve metabolic health, with a touch of pepper to increase bioavailability. We’re sure you’re going to love it!

We will send the first 100 people that leave us a 5-star review on iTunes (video instructions) a 50g sample of Hormetea. Please send your US shipping address to support@nourishbalancethrive.com

About the Hormetea ingredients:

Polyphenols

Matcha - green tea catechins

Grape seed extract

Turmeric

Broccoli seeds

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Tommy Wood, MD, PhD:

[00:00:29] Icelandic Health Symposium. Tommy's talk from last year’s event.

[00:02:25] This year’s event is called Who Wants to Live Forever.

[00:02:41] Maryanne DeMasi was last year’s host, this year it’s Tommy!

[00:02:55] Speakers: Ben Greenfield, Dr Bryan Walsh, Diana Rogers, Dr Dominic D’Agostino, Dr Doug McGuff, Dr Rangan Chatterjee, Dr Satchidananda Panda.

[00:03:49] Speaker dinner.

[00:03:58] Practitioner workshop.

[00:04:59] Mountain biking in Iceland.

[00:05:18] PHAT FIBRE, Wood, Thomas R., and Christopher Kelly. "Insulin, glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate responses to a medium-chain triglyceride-based sports supplement: A pilot study." Journal of Insulin Resistance 2.1 (2017): 9.

[00:06:46] PFv2 is more ketogenic (C8 oil).

[00:07:01] Some glucose is required even in low-carb athletes.

[00:07:37] Professor Kieran Clarke.

[00:09:06] Testing nutritional supplements.

[00:10:10] Professor Elizabeth Nance.

[00:10:48] Hormetea.

[00:11:14] Hormesis.

[00:11:32] Plant polyphenols.

[00:12:03] Rhonda Patrick, PhD.

[00:13:28] Anthocyanins.

[00:13:53] Root causes of MS talk.

[00:16:02] Berries at the farmer's market.

[00:16:53] Frozen berries can be found online.

[00:17:19] Matcha green tea.

[00:18:52] Grapeseed extract (not grapefruit seed extract).

[00:20:38] Turmeric.

[00:21:33] Meriva.

[00:22:33] Broccoli sprouts.

[00:24:03] Morning smoothie.

[00:24:14] NRf2.

[00:26:18] Hormesis in the metabolically deranged.

[00:27:09] 8-hydroxy-2' -deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG).

[00:28:12] Hormetea preparation instructions.

[00:29:27] Video instructions for review.

[00:31:57] Organic acids test (OAT).

[00:32:24] Podcast: Bill Shaw, PhD.

[00:33:35] Tommy's results: before and after.

[00:33:46] Qualia (we have no financial affiliation).

[00:35:21] PhD defence.

[00:36:07] Acute stimulation then a come down.

[00:38:23] MOA dopamine.

[00:40:05] Professor Robert Sapolsky dopamine video.

[00:42:05] Noradrenaline (because there ain’t no receptor for norepinephrine).

[00:43:10] Serotonin.

[00:44:28] Kyurinate and quinolinate.

[00:44:56] 5-HTP

[00:47:30] Book a free EPP Starter Session.

[00:48:43] Model of encephalopathy of prematurity at the University of Washington.

[00:53:53] Sign up for our Highlights email.

]]>
no
Arrhythmias in Endurance Athletes https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Peter.Backx.on.2017-04-04.at.10.32.mp3 Peter H Backx, PhD is a senior scientist at Toronto General Hospital Research Institute and also at York University. Dr Backx is a recognised expert in cardiac mechanics, heart failure and arrhythmias. His research focuses on the role of ion transport, ion channels and myocardial signalling in the initiation and progression of heart disease with a particular interest in atrial fibrillation. He holds a patent on tissue-specific drug delivery and has published over 190 peer-reviewed articles, many in the top tier journals like Cell, Nature, Nature Medicine, Journal of Clinical Investigation and Circulation Research. His work has been cited over 12,900 times, with over 5600 in the last 5 years. Dr Backx has delivered over 150 distinguished invited lectures at the national and international level.

You could listen to this podcast to learn more about the causes of arrhythmias in endurance athletes.

Special thanks to Mark Featherman for the introduction to Dr Backx and also some excellent questions.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline with Peter H Backx, PhD:

[00:00:06] Book: The Haywire Heart: How too much exercise can kill you, and what you can do to protect your heart.

[00:00:21] PHAT FIBRE MCT oil powder.

[00:01:27] Toronto General Hospital Research Institute (TGHRI).

[00:01:50] Atrial arrhythmias.

[00:03:23] The electrical system of the heart.

[00:04:04] SA node.

[00:07:30] Main symptoms: fatigue, dizziness.

[00:09:02] Peter is trained as a cardiac electrophysiologist.

[00:09:18] Sudden cardiac death.

[00:09:43] Ventricular tachycardia.

[00:10:23] The dangers of afib.

[00:11:03] Paroxysmal (acute) afib.

[00:12:07] Tommy and Mark Cucuzzella podcast: greatest risk endurance athletes doing more than an hour per day for 20 years.

[00:13:01] Biggest risk factor is ageing.

[00:13:36] CVD risk factors are also predictive of afib.

[00:14:39] Is there a threshold?

[00:15:25] Athletes may be at great risk for vfib.

[00:17:30] Genetic predisposition.

[00:18:33] Exosome (genetic) testing.

[00:19:15] Ion channels.

[00:20:17] Ablation.

[00:22:24] Mark Featherman, you rock!

[00:22:55] If you continue doing the same thing, will you develop another arrhythmia?

[00:24:44] Finding the sweet spot of exercise.

[00:25:36] Exercise intensity.

[00:26:20] Polarised training. See Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:27:00] Rodent studies.

[00:28:18] Only the mice running on weighted wheels developed pathological changes.

[00:32:13] Chronic inflammation.

[00:32:41] Rheumatoid arthritis.

[00:34:05] TNF-a is a mechanosensor.

[00:34:58] TNF-a inhibitors.

[00:35:51] Etanercept.

[00:36:09] XPro®1595.

[00:37:02] Blood testing for TNF-a.

[00:37:41] Kroetsch, Jeffrey T., et al. "Constitutive smooth muscle tumour necrosis factor regulates microvascular myogenic responsiveness and systemic blood pressure." Nature Communications 8 (2017).

[00:39:01] Sebastian Bolz, PhD. See Hui, Sonya, et al. "Sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling regulates myogenic responsiveness in human resistance arteries." PloS one 10.9 (2015): e0138142.

[00:41:11] The atria as an endocrine organ, see atrial natriuretic factor.

[00:42:36] Stretching the atria.

[00:42:46] Alcohol.

[00:43:54] Increased parasympathetic activity.

[00:45:43] Low-dose alcohol is a stimulant, at higher doses, it's a depressant.

[00:47:31] Caffeine.

[00:50:12] Acid reflux.

[00:50:37] Vagus nerve.

[00:51:54] A hiatal hernia.

[00:52:37] Proton pump inhibitors and dementia.

[00:53:21] The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy.

[00:53:54] Lysosomes.

[00:55:03] The vulnerability period increases the chances of a “false start”.

[00:58:18] Vagus nerve releases acetylcholine.

[01:00:34] Are ablation procedures overperformed?

[01:01:14] Stroke.

[01:03:16] Increased back pressure “volume overload” models.

[01:05:03] Heart & Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence.

[01:05:39] York University, Canada.

[01:05:56] MRI on cyclists.

[01:06:39] PubMed author search for Peter H. Backx.

[01:07:34] Developing methods for producing atrial cardiomyocytes from stem cells.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Peter.Backx.on.2017-04-04.at.10.32.mp3 Thu, 04 May 2017 19:05:29 GMT Christopher Kelly Peter H Backx, PhD is a senior scientist at Toronto General Hospital Research Institute and also at York University. Dr Backx is a recognised expert in cardiac mechanics, heart failure and arrhythmias. His research focuses on the role of ion transport, ion channels and myocardial signalling in the initiation and progression of heart disease with a particular interest in atrial fibrillation. He holds a patent on tissue-specific drug delivery and has published over 190 peer-reviewed articles, many in the top tier journals like Cell, Nature, Nature Medicine, Journal of Clinical Investigation and Circulation Research. His work has been cited over 12,900 times, with over 5600 in the last 5 years. Dr Backx has delivered over 150 distinguished invited lectures at the national and international level.

You could listen to this podcast to learn more about the causes of arrhythmias in endurance athletes.

Special thanks to Mark Featherman for the introduction to Dr Backx and also some excellent questions.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline with Peter H Backx, PhD:

[00:00:06] Book: The Haywire Heart: How too much exercise can kill you, and what you can do to protect your heart.

[00:00:21] PHAT FIBRE MCT oil powder.

[00:01:27] Toronto General Hospital Research Institute (TGHRI).

[00:01:50] Atrial arrhythmias.

[00:03:23] The electrical system of the heart.

[00:04:04] SA node.

[00:07:30] Main symptoms: fatigue, dizziness.

[00:09:02] Peter is trained as a cardiac electrophysiologist.

[00:09:18] Sudden cardiac death.

[00:09:43] Ventricular tachycardia.

[00:10:23] The dangers of afib.

[00:11:03] Paroxysmal (acute) afib.

[00:12:07] Tommy and Mark Cucuzzella podcast: greatest risk endurance athletes doing more than an hour per day for 20 years.

[00:13:01] Biggest risk factor is ageing.

[00:13:36] CVD risk factors are also predictive of afib.

[00:14:39] Is there a threshold?

[00:15:25] Athletes may be at great risk for vfib.

[00:17:30] Genetic predisposition.

[00:18:33] Exosome (genetic) testing.

[00:19:15] Ion channels.

[00:20:17] Ablation.

[00:22:24] Mark Featherman, you rock!

[00:22:55] If you continue doing the same thing, will you develop another arrhythmia?

[00:24:44] Finding the sweet spot of exercise.

[00:25:36] Exercise intensity.

[00:26:20] Polarised training. See Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:27:00] Rodent studies.

[00:28:18] Only the mice running on weighted wheels developed pathological changes.

[00:32:13] Chronic inflammation.

[00:32:41] Rheumatoid arthritis.

[00:34:05] TNF-a is a mechanosensor.

[00:34:58] TNF-a inhibitors.

[00:35:51] Etanercept.

[00:36:09] XPro®1595.

[00:37:02] Blood testing for TNF-a.

[00:37:41] Kroetsch, Jeffrey T., et al. "Constitutive smooth muscle tumour necrosis factor regulates microvascular myogenic responsiveness and systemic blood pressure." Nature Communications 8 (2017).

[00:39:01] Sebastian Bolz, PhD. See Hui, Sonya, et al. "Sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling regulates myogenic responsiveness in human resistance arteries." PloS one 10.9 (2015): e0138142.

[00:41:11] The atria as an endocrine organ, see atrial natriuretic factor.

[00:42:36] Stretching the atria.

[00:42:46] Alcohol.

[00:43:54] Increased parasympathetic activity.

[00:45:43] Low-dose alcohol is a stimulant, at higher doses, it's a depressant.

[00:47:31] Caffeine.

[00:50:12] Acid reflux.

[00:50:37] Vagus nerve.

[00:51:54] A hiatal hernia.

[00:52:37] Proton pump inhibitors and dementia.

[00:53:21] The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy.

[00:53:54] Lysosomes.

[00:55:03] The vulnerability period increases the chances of a “false start”.

[00:58:18] Vagus nerve releases acetylcholine.

[01:00:34] Are ablation procedures overperformed?

[01:01:14] Stroke.

[01:03:16] Increased back pressure “volume overload” models.

[01:05:03] Heart & Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence.

[01:05:39] York University, Canada.

[01:05:56] MRI on cyclists.

[01:06:39] PubMed author search for Peter H. Backx.

[01:07:34] Developing methods for producing atrial cardiomyocytes from stem cells.

]]>
clean
How to Achieve High Intensity Health with Mike Mutzel https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.Mutzel.04.17.mp3 In this episode, Dr Tommy Wood turns the mic on one of our favourite podcast hosts, Mike Mutzel.

Mike has a B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Clinical Nutrition and is a graduate of the Institute for Functional Medicine. He is an independent consultant for one of the world’s leading professional nutrition companies (XYMOGEN) and the host of the High Intensity Health show.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Mike Mutzel:

[00:00:26] High Intensity Health.

[00:00:37] Book: Belly Fat Effect: The Real Secret About How Your Diet, Intestinal Health, and Gut Bacteria Help You Burn Fat.

[00:01:07] Health history.

[00:01:59] Biotics Research.

[00:02:36] University of Colorado medical school.

[00:03:27] XYMOGEN supplements.

[00:08:13] Finding a practitioner.

[00:09:48] Incretins.

[00:10:13] Bariatric surgery.

[00:11:05] GLP-1, GLP-2, GIP-1, PYY.

[00:11:57] L-cells.

[00:13:08] Metformin.

[00:13:25] Berberine.

[00:13:30] Whey protein.

[00:13:42] Dietary fat and CCK.

[00:13:52] Polyphenols.

[00:14:42] Chew your food.

[00:15:58] Unprocessed food.

[00:17:30] Mike's home environment.

[00:19:25] Chickens and dogs.

[00:20:30] Podcast: Social isolation Bryan Walsh, ND.

[00:20:40] Tommy’s IHS talk.

[00:23:13] Managing your spouse

[00:25:35] Men who get married live longer but women don't.

[00:26:27] Circadian biology.

[00:26:38] Alessandro Ferretti.

[00:27:13] HRV.

[00:28:35] Ketogenic diet mood changes.

[00:30:21] Angela Poff in Dominic D'Agostino’s lab.

[00:33:03] Spreading the word.

[00:33:27] PHAT FIBRE.

[00:34:43] Eating junk food on a plane.

[00:35:58] Mark Hyman, MD.

[00:36:37] Time restricted feeding.

[00:38:37] Raymond Edmunds of Optimal Ketogenic Living.

[00:39:55] Jason Fung, MD.

[00:41:31] Maintaining strength.

[00:41:51] Ron Rosedale, MD.

[00:42:57] Morning routine.

[00:45:26] Traveling.

[00:46:37] Stuck in a elevator with a politician.

[00:48:11] Modern agriculture and community gardening.

[00:49:08] Detroit grocery stores.

[00:50:19] Mouth taping.

[00:50:54] High Intensity Health on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.Mutzel.04.17.mp3 Thu, 27 Apr 2017 18:04:22 GMT Christopher Kelly In this episode, Dr Tommy Wood turns the mic on one of our favourite podcast hosts, Mike Mutzel.

Mike has a B.S. in Biology and M.S. in Clinical Nutrition and is a graduate of the Institute for Functional Medicine. He is an independent consultant for one of the world’s leading professional nutrition companies (XYMOGEN) and the host of the High Intensity Health show.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Mike Mutzel:

[00:00:26] High Intensity Health.

[00:00:37] Book: Belly Fat Effect: The Real Secret About How Your Diet, Intestinal Health, and Gut Bacteria Help You Burn Fat.

[00:01:07] Health history.

[00:01:59] Biotics Research.

[00:02:36] University of Colorado medical school.

[00:03:27] XYMOGEN supplements.

[00:08:13] Finding a practitioner.

[00:09:48] Incretins.

[00:10:13] Bariatric surgery.

[00:11:05] GLP-1, GLP-2, GIP-1, PYY.

[00:11:57] L-cells.

[00:13:08] Metformin.

[00:13:25] Berberine.

[00:13:30] Whey protein.

[00:13:42] Dietary fat and CCK.

[00:13:52] Polyphenols.

[00:14:42] Chew your food.

[00:15:58] Unprocessed food.

[00:17:30] Mike's home environment.

[00:19:25] Chickens and dogs.

[00:20:30] Podcast: Social isolation Bryan Walsh, ND.

[00:20:40] Tommy’s IHS talk.

[00:23:13] Managing your spouse

[00:25:35] Men who get married live longer but women don't.

[00:26:27] Circadian biology.

[00:26:38] Alessandro Ferretti.

[00:27:13] HRV.

[00:28:35] Ketogenic diet mood changes.

[00:30:21] Angela Poff in Dominic D'Agostino’s lab.

[00:33:03] Spreading the word.

[00:33:27] PHAT FIBRE.

[00:34:43] Eating junk food on a plane.

[00:35:58] Mark Hyman, MD.

[00:36:37] Time restricted feeding.

[00:38:37] Raymond Edmunds of Optimal Ketogenic Living.

[00:39:55] Jason Fung, MD.

[00:41:31] Maintaining strength.

[00:41:51] Ron Rosedale, MD.

[00:42:57] Morning routine.

[00:45:26] Traveling.

[00:46:37] Stuck in a elevator with a politician.

[00:48:11] Modern agriculture and community gardening.

[00:49:08] Detroit grocery stores.

[00:50:19] Mouth taping.

[00:50:54] High Intensity Health on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram.

]]>
no
How to Overcome Amenorrhoea https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tawnee.Prazak.on.2017-03-15.at.10.01.mp3 Tawnee Prazak, MS, CSCS, is a triathlete and triathlon coach living in Laguna Beach, California. She’s been involved in the endurance world for nearly a decade and is considered one of today’s leading experts in the field of endurance training, racing, strength training, nutrition and wellness.

When I first started listening to Tawnee’s Endurance Planet podcast, I was utterly addicted to carbohydrate, unable to go more than 40 minutes on the bike without sucking down 30g of sugar in the form of a maltodextrin gel. Week by week her fat-adaptation message sank in, and with some help of UCAN Superstarch training wheels, I was able to dig myself out of that hole.

You should listen to this interview to learn how Tawnee overcame an eating disorder and restored her hormone health; all while continue to enjoy endurance sports.

Check out Life Post Collective, Tawnee's inner-circle community and holistic wellness hub that focuses on taking your health, fitness and nutrition to the next level. People can get access to Tawnee, all her coaching resources, recipes, webinars, like-minded members, and more. Use code "lpc4me" to get your first month free, after that it's just $10/mo.

Contact Tawnee for coaching or consults at coachtawnee.com

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tawnee Prazak:

[00:00:22] Endurance Planet podcast.

[00:02:47] The Paleo Mom.

[00:03:55] Tawnee's approach to triathlon in 2007.

[00:06:11] The peak before the crash.

[00:07:37] Anorexia.

[00:08:58] Using training as an excuse for disordered eating.

[00:09:49] LCHF.

[00:11:01] Specialising in not specialising; Low-carb Breckenridge.

[00:13:33] The anorexia diagnosis.

[00:16:14] Amenorrhoea.

[00:17:04] Oral birth control.

[00:18:35] Bone density.

[00:20:14] Cognitive decline and CVD risk; see Ann Hathaway podcast below.

[00:20:54] The female triad: low energy availability, amenorrhoea, decreased bone density.

[00:21:08] “Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport” (RED-S).

[00:22:06] Fertility.

[00:23:00] Podcast: Ann Hathaway, MD.

[00:23:52] Root causes of the triad.

[00:24:09] Stress (of all types).

[00:25:49] Learning to say no.

[00:26:53] Productivity .

[00:27:39] Over-exercising.

[00:27:59] Too low-carb.

[00:28:44] Book: No Period. Now What?: A Guide to Regaining Your Cycles and Improving Your Fertility by Nicola J Rinaldi, PhD.

[00:30:05] Teasing apart the effect of low-carb.

[00:31:00] Gender differences.

[00:31:33] Book: Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food by Cate Shanahan, MD

[00:32:55] Cycling carb intake.

[00:33:34] Rapid weight loss,

[00:33:54] Trauma ,

[00:35:27] Compatability of fat-adaptation and hormonal health.

[00:37:01] Cat skiing.

[00:39:40] Tawnee's sweet spot is 90-120g CHO per day.

[00:42:27] UCAN Superstarch, and a honey solution.

[00:44:49] Energy availability formula: 30 kCal per kg of lean body mass, see Reed, Jennifer L., et al. "Energy availability discriminates clinical menstrual status in exercising women." Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 12.1 (2015): 11.

[00:45:46] Gut health.

[00:48:09] Testing.

[00:48:33] Greg White.

[00:50:27] Training plans vs healing protocols.

[00:52:51] Endurance vs strength athlete differences.

[00:53:04] Outside Magazine article on health benefits of a thru-hike/backpacking.

[00:53:55] Stand-up paddle boarding.

[00:56:18] Ocean swimming in Santa Cruz.

[00:57:05] Getting a dog.

[01:00:12] Podcast: Lauren Petersen, PhD.

[01:00:28] Song, Se Jin, et al. "Cohabiting family members share microbiota with one another and with their dogs." Elife 2 (2013): e00458.

[01:01:19] Coaching with Tawnee

[01:02:04] Life Post Collective.

[01:03:41] Brie Wieselman, LAc.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tawnee.Prazak.on.2017-03-15.at.10.01.mp3 Thu, 20 Apr 2017 18:04:45 GMT Christopher Kelly Tawnee Prazak, MS, CSCS, is a triathlete and triathlon coach living in Laguna Beach, California. She’s been involved in the endurance world for nearly a decade and is considered one of today’s leading experts in the field of endurance training, racing, strength training, nutrition and wellness.

When I first started listening to Tawnee’s Endurance Planet podcast, I was utterly addicted to carbohydrate, unable to go more than 40 minutes on the bike without sucking down 30g of sugar in the form of a maltodextrin gel. Week by week her fat-adaptation message sank in, and with some help of UCAN Superstarch training wheels, I was able to dig myself out of that hole.

You should listen to this interview to learn how Tawnee overcame an eating disorder and restored her hormone health; all while continue to enjoy endurance sports.

Check out Life Post Collective, Tawnee's inner-circle community and holistic wellness hub that focuses on taking your health, fitness and nutrition to the next level. People can get access to Tawnee, all her coaching resources, recipes, webinars, like-minded members, and more. Use code "lpc4me" to get your first month free, after that it's just $10/mo.

Contact Tawnee for coaching or consults at coachtawnee.com

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tawnee Prazak:

[00:00:22] Endurance Planet podcast.

[00:02:47] The Paleo Mom.

[00:03:55] Tawnee's approach to triathlon in 2007.

[00:06:11] The peak before the crash.

[00:07:37] Anorexia.

[00:08:58] Using training as an excuse for disordered eating.

[00:09:49] LCHF.

[00:11:01] Specialising in not specialising; Low-carb Breckenridge.

[00:13:33] The anorexia diagnosis.

[00:16:14] Amenorrhoea.

[00:17:04] Oral birth control.

[00:18:35] Bone density.

[00:20:14] Cognitive decline and CVD risk; see Ann Hathaway podcast below.

[00:20:54] The female triad: low energy availability, amenorrhoea, decreased bone density.

[00:21:08] “Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport” (RED-S).

[00:22:06] Fertility.

[00:23:00] Podcast: Ann Hathaway, MD.

[00:23:52] Root causes of the triad.

[00:24:09] Stress (of all types).

[00:25:49] Learning to say no.

[00:26:53] Productivity .

[00:27:39] Over-exercising.

[00:27:59] Too low-carb.

[00:28:44] Book: No Period. Now What?: A Guide to Regaining Your Cycles and Improving Your Fertility by Nicola J Rinaldi, PhD.

[00:30:05] Teasing apart the effect of low-carb.

[00:31:00] Gender differences.

[00:31:33] Book: Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food by Cate Shanahan, MD

[00:32:55] Cycling carb intake.

[00:33:34] Rapid weight loss,

[00:33:54] Trauma ,

[00:35:27] Compatability of fat-adaptation and hormonal health.

[00:37:01] Cat skiing.

[00:39:40] Tawnee's sweet spot is 90-120g CHO per day.

[00:42:27] UCAN Superstarch, and a honey solution.

[00:44:49] Energy availability formula: 30 kCal per kg of lean body mass, see Reed, Jennifer L., et al. "Energy availability discriminates clinical menstrual status in exercising women." Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 12.1 (2015): 11.

[00:45:46] Gut health.

[00:48:09] Testing.

[00:48:33] Greg White.

[00:50:27] Training plans vs healing protocols.

[00:52:51] Endurance vs strength athlete differences.

[00:53:04] Outside Magazine article on health benefits of a thru-hike/backpacking.

[00:53:55] Stand-up paddle boarding.

[00:56:18] Ocean swimming in Santa Cruz.

[00:57:05] Getting a dog.

[01:00:12] Podcast: Lauren Petersen, PhD.

[01:00:28] Song, Se Jin, et al. "Cohabiting family members share microbiota with one another and with their dogs." Elife 2 (2013): e00458.

[01:01:19] Coaching with Tawnee

[01:02:04] Life Post Collective.

[01:03:41] Brie Wieselman, LAc.

]]>
clean
How to Fix Autoimmunity in the over 50s https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Deborah.Gordon.on.2017-03-14.at.11.30.mp3 Deborah Gordon, MD is a doctor practicing in Ashland, Oregon. Her focus is real food and an active lifestyle which she integrates with gentle and targeted medicine.

You should listen to this interview to learn about the common problems that Dr Gordon encounters in her practice and the treatments getting the best results. We talk about the gut microbiota and gut health in general and the potential link to autoimmunity in its various guises. I was particularly interested in learning of a potential autoimmune connection with atrial fibrillation (afib).

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline with this interview with Deborah Gordon, MD:

[00:00:06] Sign up for our highlights email.

[00:02:31] Physicians for Ancestral Health.

[00:04:17] Dean Ornish.

[00:04:28] Weston A. Price Foundation, Gary Taubes.

[00:05:49] Pantheism.

[00:08:58] Midwifery.

[00:11:25] Acceptance from other doctors.

[00:16:55] That Mitchell and Webb Look: Homeopathic A&E.

[00:18:03] Dr Mark Cucuzzella jokingly sent us this infographic. Do the opposite and you’ll get great results!

[00:19:09] Podcast: Prof Tim Noakes.

[00:19:31] Autoimmunity in postmenopausal women.

[00:20:00] Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

[00:20:06] Coeliac and Sjögren's.

[00:20:19] Crohn's and Ulcerative colitis.

[00:22:51] Atrial fibrillation (Afib).

[00:23:07] Anticardiolipin antibody panel.

[00:24:07] The triad: genetics, stressor, leaky gut.

[00:25:41] Gluten and zonulin signalling.

[00:26:25] Exercise-induced leaky gut.

[00:31:16] Hs-CRP.

[00:33:22] Tools to relax: Brain Wave app.

[00:33:41] Dale Bredesen, MD.

[00:34:00] HeartMath, massage.

[00:34:34] Genova Diagnostic nutrition evaluation panel (NutrEval).

[00:34:56] Vitamin A.

[00:35:13] US Wellness Meats.

[00:35:58] Chicken Liver mousse recipe on Dr Gordon’s website.

[00:36:28] Denise Minger BCMO1 gene.

[00:36:58] B1 and B2 deficiency.

[00:37:32] We like the Multi-Vitamin Elite, Dr Gordon prefers the copper-free variants.

[00:38:56] Serum copper and zinc.

[00:39:40] Podcast: Anne Hathaway, MD.

[00:40:04] Chris Masterjohn's antioxidant masterclass.

[00:40:55] 8-OHdG.

[00:41:42] ClevelandHeartLab, Inc.

[00:43:10] APOE. Podcast: Dawn Kernagis, PhD.

[00:43:31] Podcast: Bryan Walsh.

[00:44:18] Bilirubin, GGT, uric acid.

[00:45:07] Fatty liver index.

[00:47:09] Paleo f(x).

[00:48:07] Doctor's Data.

[00:48:55] Lacto and bifido.

[00:49:21] Podcast: Dr Michael Ruscio.

[00:49:53] Gut microbiome diversity.

[00:51:52] Fermented foods.

[00:52:50] Podcast: Lauren Petersen, PhD.

[00:53:56] Low-carb Breckenridge talk on fibre was not online at the time of writing.

[00:54:37] Bill Lagakos: Animal Fibre.

[00:55:03] Dr Gordon’s practice is closed except for patients interested in the Bredesen Protocol.

[00:55:34] Her Physicians for Ancestral Health talk was not online at the time of writing.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Deborah.Gordon.on.2017-03-14.at.11.30.mp3 Fri, 14 Apr 2017 07:04:46 GMT Christopher Kelly Deborah Gordon, MD is a doctor practicing in Ashland, Oregon. Her focus is real food and an active lifestyle which she integrates with gentle and targeted medicine.

You should listen to this interview to learn about the common problems that Dr Gordon encounters in her practice and the treatments getting the best results. We talk about the gut microbiota and gut health in general and the potential link to autoimmunity in its various guises. I was particularly interested in learning of a potential autoimmune connection with atrial fibrillation (afib).

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline with this interview with Deborah Gordon, MD:

[00:00:06] Sign up for our highlights email.

[00:02:31] Physicians for Ancestral Health.

[00:04:17] Dean Ornish.

[00:04:28] Weston A. Price Foundation, Gary Taubes.

[00:05:49] Pantheism.

[00:08:58] Midwifery.

[00:11:25] Acceptance from other doctors.

[00:16:55] That Mitchell and Webb Look: Homeopathic A&E.

[00:18:03] Dr Mark Cucuzzella jokingly sent us this infographic. Do the opposite and you’ll get great results!

[00:19:09] Podcast: Prof Tim Noakes.

[00:19:31] Autoimmunity in postmenopausal women.

[00:20:00] Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

[00:20:06] Coeliac and Sjögren's.

[00:20:19] Crohn's and Ulcerative colitis.

[00:22:51] Atrial fibrillation (Afib).

[00:23:07] Anticardiolipin antibody panel.

[00:24:07] The triad: genetics, stressor, leaky gut.

[00:25:41] Gluten and zonulin signalling.

[00:26:25] Exercise-induced leaky gut.

[00:31:16] Hs-CRP.

[00:33:22] Tools to relax: Brain Wave app.

[00:33:41] Dale Bredesen, MD.

[00:34:00] HeartMath, massage.

[00:34:34] Genova Diagnostic nutrition evaluation panel (NutrEval).

[00:34:56] Vitamin A.

[00:35:13] US Wellness Meats.

[00:35:58] Chicken Liver mousse recipe on Dr Gordon’s website.

[00:36:28] Denise Minger BCMO1 gene.

[00:36:58] B1 and B2 deficiency.

[00:37:32] We like the Multi-Vitamin Elite, Dr Gordon prefers the copper-free variants.

[00:38:56] Serum copper and zinc.

[00:39:40] Podcast: Anne Hathaway, MD.

[00:40:04] Chris Masterjohn's antioxidant masterclass.

[00:40:55] 8-OHdG.

[00:41:42] ClevelandHeartLab, Inc.

[00:43:10] APOE. Podcast: Dawn Kernagis, PhD.

[00:43:31] Podcast: Bryan Walsh.

[00:44:18] Bilirubin, GGT, uric acid.

[00:45:07] Fatty liver index.

[00:47:09] Paleo f(x).

[00:48:07] Doctor's Data.

[00:48:55] Lacto and bifido.

[00:49:21] Podcast: Dr Michael Ruscio.

[00:49:53] Gut microbiome diversity.

[00:51:52] Fermented foods.

[00:52:50] Podcast: Lauren Petersen, PhD.

[00:53:56] Low-carb Breckenridge talk on fibre was not online at the time of writing.

[00:54:37] Bill Lagakos: Animal Fibre.

[00:55:03] Dr Gordon’s practice is closed except for patients interested in the Bredesen Protocol.

[00:55:34] Her Physicians for Ancestral Health talk was not online at the time of writing.

]]>
no
How to Make a Career in Paleo https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tony.Federico.on.2017-02-15.at.12.02.mp3 Tony Federico is a shining example of how to make a career out of the paleo diet and lifestyle. After a personal training client suggested the diet, Tony never looked back, going on to write for Paleo Magazine and hosting the podcast of the same name. He recently made the decision to move on to VP of marketing at Natural Force; a supplement company committed to making products using only the purest, highest quality, all-natural and organic ingredients.

You should listen to this interview for inspiration, business and career advice.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tony Federico:

[00:00:08] Exercise in a pill? Perhaps not. Sign up for our highlights email for the references.

[00:01:57] Paleo Magazine Radio podcast.

[00:02:11] Tony is now VP of marketing at Natural Force.

[00:04:22] Exercise science in college.

[00:06:07] Psychology degree and personal training certification.

[00:07:50] Crossfit and Paleo.

[00:08:02] Dr Loren Cordain.

[00:09:09] 90-day Paleo challenge on livecaveman.com.

[00:09:50] Mark Sisson interview.

[00:11:23] Many iterations of Paleo.

[00:12:49] Mark's Daily Apple and Primal.

[00:13:15] Carbohydrate curve.

[00:13:25] Book: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes.

[00:14:24] Blood lipids.

[00:16:14] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:18:14] Food restrictions as symptom control.

[00:19:30] Ex-smoker syndrome.

[00:20:42] The Paleo industry has caught up.

[00:21:20] Paleo Protein and certification.

[00:22:11] Robb Wolf and Art De Vany, PhD.

[00:22:24] Paul Jaminet, PhD.

[00:22:51] Paleo f(x) and AHS.

[00:23:39] Bulletproof Coffee.

[00:26:29] Primal Kitchen – Avocado Oil Mayo.

[00:27:15] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:27:43] Costco coconut oil.

[00:28:28] General Mills Epic Bar.

[00:30:09] Hunting.

[00:31:32] Cooking.

[00:31:40] Blue Apron.

[00:35:12] Coaching and information products, e.g. summits.

[00:35:52] Physicians for Ancestral Health.

[00:36:12] Dr Dan Kalish.

[00:36:20] Paleo Magazine interview.

[00:37:16] Chris Kresser.

[00:38:08] Squatty Potty.

[00:38:31] f.lux.

[00:39:08] Nightshift on iOS.

[00:40:58] Unhelpful: “That's not Paleo!”

[00:44:12] Stay mindful.

[00:45:01] Groupthink.

[00:45:29] Natural Force pre-workout raw tea.

[00:46:41] Founders of Natural Force (Joe & Justin).

[00:49:18] Recovery Nectar.

[00:52:40] @tonyfedfitness on Instagram, FB & Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Tony.Federico.on.2017-02-15.at.12.02.mp3 Thu, 06 Apr 2017 18:04:59 GMT Christopher Kelly Tony Federico is a shining example of how to make a career out of the paleo diet and lifestyle. After a personal training client suggested the diet, Tony never looked back, going on to write for Paleo Magazine and hosting the podcast of the same name. He recently made the decision to move on to VP of marketing at Natural Force; a supplement company committed to making products using only the purest, highest quality, all-natural and organic ingredients.

You should listen to this interview for inspiration, business and career advice.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One remarkable thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tony Federico:

[00:00:08] Exercise in a pill? Perhaps not. Sign up for our highlights email for the references.

[00:01:57] Paleo Magazine Radio podcast.

[00:02:11] Tony is now VP of marketing at Natural Force.

[00:04:22] Exercise science in college.

[00:06:07] Psychology degree and personal training certification.

[00:07:50] Crossfit and Paleo.

[00:08:02] Dr Loren Cordain.

[00:09:09] 90-day Paleo challenge on livecaveman.com.

[00:09:50] Mark Sisson interview.

[00:11:23] Many iterations of Paleo.

[00:12:49] Mark's Daily Apple and Primal.

[00:13:15] Carbohydrate curve.

[00:13:25] Book: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes.

[00:14:24] Blood lipids.

[00:16:14] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:18:14] Food restrictions as symptom control.

[00:19:30] Ex-smoker syndrome.

[00:20:42] The Paleo industry has caught up.

[00:21:20] Paleo Protein and certification.

[00:22:11] Robb Wolf and Art De Vany, PhD.

[00:22:24] Paul Jaminet, PhD.

[00:22:51] Paleo f(x) and AHS.

[00:23:39] Bulletproof Coffee.

[00:26:29] Primal Kitchen – Avocado Oil Mayo.

[00:27:15] Wild Planet sardines.

[00:27:43] Costco coconut oil.

[00:28:28] General Mills Epic Bar.

[00:30:09] Hunting.

[00:31:32] Cooking.

[00:31:40] Blue Apron.

[00:35:12] Coaching and information products, e.g. summits.

[00:35:52] Physicians for Ancestral Health.

[00:36:12] Dr Dan Kalish.

[00:36:20] Paleo Magazine interview.

[00:37:16] Chris Kresser.

[00:38:08] Squatty Potty.

[00:38:31] f.lux.

[00:39:08] Nightshift on iOS.

[00:40:58] Unhelpful: “That's not Paleo!”

[00:44:12] Stay mindful.

[00:45:01] Groupthink.

[00:45:29] Natural Force pre-workout raw tea.

[00:46:41] Founders of Natural Force (Joe & Justin).

[00:49:18] Recovery Nectar.

[00:52:40] @tonyfedfitness on Instagram, FB & Twitter.

]]>
clean
How to Run Efficiently with Drs Cucuzzella & Wood https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mark.Cucuzzella.4.mp3 Dr Mark Cucuzzella, MD, is Professor of medicine at West Virginia University medical school, Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), family physician for over 20 years, Lt Col in the US Air Force Reserves, and an avid runner and running coach.

In this episode, Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and Dr Cucuzzella discuss optimal nutrition, running efficiency, fat-adaptation, atrial fibrillation and more.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Mark Cucuzzella, MD:

[00:00:19] Eat berries! And sign up for our Highlights email series.

[00:02:39] Robb Wolf Paleo Solution Episode 329 – Dr. Mark Cucuzzella – A Doctor’s Perspective On Treating Diabetes.

[00:03:38] West Virginia University school of medicine.

[00:04:30] Food insecurity.

[00:05:11] In the Shopping Cart of a Food Stamp Household: Lots of Soda.

[00:06:25] Training people to run and be resilient to injury.

[00:08:10] Efficient Running online course.

[00:11:16] Fit to Win clinic at the Pentagon.

[00:13:03] "Born insulin resistant"–

[00:14:30] Weight Watchers 94% failure rate.

[00:15:31] $60B weight loss industry.

[00:16:20] Real Meal Revolution.

[00:18:22] Giving HOPE!

[00:19:27] Virta Health.

[00:19:42] Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP).

[00:21:20] Phinney, Volek & Hallberg.

[00:21:39] Sarah Hallberg video: Reversing Type 2 diabetes starts with ignoring the guidelines.

[00:22:36] Burn Fat for Health and Performance: Becoming A “Better Butter Burner” (Mark’s VO2 Max results).

[00:23:53] Early running days

[00:24:25] Injuries

[00:25:44] “Most of what we learned in medical school for chronic conditions is wrong”–Dr Mark Cucuzzella.

[00:25:55] Get Fast by Going Slow–Mark Allen article I couldn’t find online, see MAF Methodology instead.

[00:27:13] Brooks Running.

[00:29:54] What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie? By Gary Taubes.

[00:30:53] Book: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes.

[00:31:16] Fasting blood glucose 120 mg/dL.

[00:33:12] Art DeVany. See his recent IHMC lecture.

[00:35:49] Book: The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance by David Epstein

[00:37:01] Kettlebells and Plyometrics.

[00:39:23] Atrial fibrillation.

[00:40:17] CAC score; see The Widowmaker movie.

[00:41:39] Professor Daniel E. Lieberman.

[00:42:02] Hs-CRP.

[00:42:09] NMR LipoProfile®.

[00:43:59] Book: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price.

[00:44:45] Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:46:02] Horses versus mules.

[00:46:58] Stephen Seiler, PhD.

[00:48:16] The basics are the same for everyone.

[00:48:31] Sleep and sunlight.

[00:49:29] 1.2 - 1.9 g per minute fat oxidation.

[00:50:57] Sami Inkinen.

[00:51:48] Burn Fat for Health and Performance: Becoming A “Better Butter Burner”

[00:55:00] Faster recovery.

[00:56:34] Rowing.

[00:58:52] The MedCHEFS program at WVU Eastern Division; Professor Robert Lustig, MD.

[01:00:18] Try This conference, West Virginia.

[01:00:56] Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

[01:01:20] Nutrition Coalition.

[01:02:12] Two Rivers Treads minimalist shoe store.

[01:03:51] Natural Running Center blog.

[01:04:05] Freedom’s Run.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mark.Cucuzzella.4.mp3 Thu, 30 Mar 2017 19:03:28 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr Mark Cucuzzella, MD, is Professor of medicine at West Virginia University medical school, Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), family physician for over 20 years, Lt Col in the US Air Force Reserves, and an avid runner and running coach.

In this episode, Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD and Dr Cucuzzella discuss optimal nutrition, running efficiency, fat-adaptation, atrial fibrillation and more.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Mark Cucuzzella, MD:

[00:00:19] Eat berries! And sign up for our Highlights email series.

[00:02:39] Robb Wolf Paleo Solution Episode 329 – Dr. Mark Cucuzzella – A Doctor’s Perspective On Treating Diabetes.

[00:03:38] West Virginia University school of medicine.

[00:04:30] Food insecurity.

[00:05:11] In the Shopping Cart of a Food Stamp Household: Lots of Soda.

[00:06:25] Training people to run and be resilient to injury.

[00:08:10] Efficient Running online course.

[00:11:16] Fit to Win clinic at the Pentagon.

[00:13:03] "Born insulin resistant"–

[00:14:30] Weight Watchers 94% failure rate.

[00:15:31] $60B weight loss industry.

[00:16:20] Real Meal Revolution.

[00:18:22] Giving HOPE!

[00:19:27] Virta Health.

[00:19:42] Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP).

[00:21:20] Phinney, Volek & Hallberg.

[00:21:39] Sarah Hallberg video: Reversing Type 2 diabetes starts with ignoring the guidelines.

[00:22:36] Burn Fat for Health and Performance: Becoming A “Better Butter Burner” (Mark’s VO2 Max results).

[00:23:53] Early running days

[00:24:25] Injuries

[00:25:44] “Most of what we learned in medical school for chronic conditions is wrong”–Dr Mark Cucuzzella.

[00:25:55] Get Fast by Going Slow–Mark Allen article I couldn’t find online, see MAF Methodology instead.

[00:27:13] Brooks Running.

[00:29:54] What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie? By Gary Taubes.

[00:30:53] Book: Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes.

[00:31:16] Fasting blood glucose 120 mg/dL.

[00:33:12] Art DeVany. See his recent IHMC lecture.

[00:35:49] Book: The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance by David Epstein

[00:37:01] Kettlebells and Plyometrics.

[00:39:23] Atrial fibrillation.

[00:40:17] CAC score; see The Widowmaker movie.

[00:41:39] Professor Daniel E. Lieberman.

[00:42:02] Hs-CRP.

[00:42:09] NMR LipoProfile®.

[00:43:59] Book: Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price.

[00:44:45] Hydren, Jay R., and Bruce S. Cohen. "Current scientific evidence for a polarized cardiovascular endurance training model." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.12 (2015): 3523-3530.

[00:46:02] Horses versus mules.

[00:46:58] Stephen Seiler, PhD.

[00:48:16] The basics are the same for everyone.

[00:48:31] Sleep and sunlight.

[00:49:29] 1.2 - 1.9 g per minute fat oxidation.

[00:50:57] Sami Inkinen.

[00:51:48] Burn Fat for Health and Performance: Becoming A “Better Butter Burner”

[00:55:00] Faster recovery.

[00:56:34] Rowing.

[00:58:52] The MedCHEFS program at WVU Eastern Division; Professor Robert Lustig, MD.

[01:00:18] Try This conference, West Virginia.

[01:00:56] Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

[01:01:20] Nutrition Coalition.

[01:02:12] Two Rivers Treads minimalist shoe store.

[01:03:51] Natural Running Center blog.

[01:04:05] Freedom’s Run.

]]>
no
An Update on The Athlete Microbiome Project https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Lauren.Petersen.on.2017-02-21.at.11.30.mp3 Lauren Petersen, PhD, is a postdoctoral associate investigating the microbiome and she’s back on the podcast to update us on her research. Be sure to listen to our first interview first!

I sent Lauren some of the probiotics we use in our practice, and she said, “they look great!”

Lauren did some calculations for the number of CFUs, and she got pretty much exactly what the bottle claims for live organisms, with growth on both Lactobacillus-selective and Bifidobacterium-selective medias. The same was not true for Renew probiotics where her qPCR analysis showed that Bifidobacterium was pretty much all dead.

Here are some photos of the Lactobacillus-selective and Bifidobacterium-selective plates that Lauren used to grow the probiotics. She shot for 250 CFUs per plate (based on if all the organisms per gramme probiotic were alive) and that's pretty much what she got!

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lauren Petersen, PhD:

[00:00:32] Previous episode: The Athlete Microbiome Project: The Search for the Golden Microbiome.

[00:03:10] Prevotella.

[00:04:42] uBiome and The American Gut Project.

[00:05:25] Scher, Jose U., et al. "Expansion of intestinal Prevotella copri correlates with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis." Elife 2 (2013): e01202.

[00:06:33] Probiotics: S. boulardii.

[00:08:48] Bifidobacteria.

[00:09:54] Testing probiotics: Renew Life.

[00:12:06] D-Lactate Free Bifido Probiotic.

[00:12:28] Sign up for our highlights email.

[00:14:44] qPCR analysis definitely picked up lactobacillus.

[00:15:33] 16S vs qPCR.

[00:16:03] RNA-Seq.

[00:17:20] Whole-genome shotgun.

[00:18:26] 60-day Bionic Fiber Program.

[00:19:11] Brummel & Brown 35% Vegetable Oil Spread with Yogurt + bananas. I’m not linking to this rubbish because it’s not fit for human consumption.

[00:21:25] Akkamansia.

[00:21:49] Remely, Marlene, et al. "Increased gut microbiota diversity and abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia after fasting: a pilot study." Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 127.9-10 (2015): 394-398.

[00:24:41] Tolerating inulin.

[00:25:22] Celeriac root.

[00:26:19] Where do the microbes come from?

[00:28:33] Antibiotics.

[00:29:09] Cephalexin antibiotic.

[00:29:56] Clindamycin antibiotic.

[00:32:08] Amoxicillin antibiotic.

[00:33:54] Metabolic endotoxaemia.

[00:39:28] Mother Dirt.

[00:41:42] FMT and the Taymount Clinic.

[00:42:17] 4-Cresol Vancomycin.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://nourishbalancethrive.s3.amazonaws.com/podcast/Lauren.Petersen.on.2017-02-21.at.11.30.mp3 Thu, 23 Mar 2017 16:03:15 GMT Christopher Kelly Lauren Petersen, PhD, is a postdoctoral associate investigating the microbiome and she’s back on the podcast to update us on her research. Be sure to listen to our first interview first!

I sent Lauren some of the probiotics we use in our practice, and she said, “they look great!”

Lauren did some calculations for the number of CFUs, and she got pretty much exactly what the bottle claims for live organisms, with growth on both Lactobacillus-selective and Bifidobacterium-selective medias. The same was not true for Renew probiotics where her qPCR analysis showed that Bifidobacterium was pretty much all dead.

Here are some photos of the Lactobacillus-selective and Bifidobacterium-selective plates that Lauren used to grow the probiotics. She shot for 250 CFUs per plate (based on if all the organisms per gramme probiotic were alive) and that's pretty much what she got!

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lauren Petersen, PhD:

[00:00:32] Previous episode: The Athlete Microbiome Project: The Search for the Golden Microbiome.

[00:03:10] Prevotella.

[00:04:42] uBiome and The American Gut Project.

[00:05:25] Scher, Jose U., et al. "Expansion of intestinal Prevotella copri correlates with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis." Elife 2 (2013): e01202.

[00:06:33] Probiotics: S. boulardii.

[00:08:48] Bifidobacteria.

[00:09:54] Testing probiotics: Renew Life.

[00:12:06] D-Lactate Free Bifido Probiotic.

[00:12:28] Sign up for our highlights email.

[00:14:44] qPCR analysis definitely picked up lactobacillus.

[00:15:33] 16S vs qPCR.

[00:16:03] RNA-Seq.

[00:17:20] Whole-genome shotgun.

[00:18:26] 60-day Bionic Fiber Program.

[00:19:11] Brummel & Brown 35% Vegetable Oil Spread with Yogurt + bananas. I’m not linking to this rubbish because it’s not fit for human consumption.

[00:21:25] Akkamansia.

[00:21:49] Remely, Marlene, et al. "Increased gut microbiota diversity and abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Akkermansia after fasting: a pilot study." Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 127.9-10 (2015): 394-398.

[00:24:41] Tolerating inulin.

[00:25:22] Celeriac root.

[00:26:19] Where do the microbes come from?

[00:28:33] Antibiotics.

[00:29:09] Cephalexin antibiotic.

[00:29:56] Clindamycin antibiotic.

[00:32:08] Amoxicillin antibiotic.

[00:33:54] Metabolic endotoxaemia.

[00:39:28] Mother Dirt.

[00:41:42] FMT and the Taymount Clinic.

[00:42:17] 4-Cresol Vancomycin.

]]>
clean
Wired to Eat with Robb Wolf https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Robb.Wolf.on.2017-02-22.at.08.59.mp3 In 2010, with his New York Times Bestselling book The Paleo Solution, Robb Wolf presented the answers that enabled me to recover my health. His podcast of the same name launched my business and connected me with the incredible partners who helped shape NBT into an online clinic that has now helped over a thousand athletes achieve optimal health and performance.

In his new book, Wired to Eat, Robb carefully examines the neuroregulation of appetite as this is necessary for eating enough to be healthy, but not so much that we see weight gain and the plethora of Western degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration and type 2 diabetes.

Robb's primary goal with this material is to remove the guilt and shame many people feel around making changes in their food and movement. We STILL need to do the work, but if we understand this may legitimately be a challenging process, we can avoid the sense of failure and self-loathing. Mixed into all this Robb talks about sleep, photoperiod, stress, digestion, the gut microbiome, autoimmunity. It’s a lot of material, but we think it covers most situations and will be helpful whether one is struggling with weight or is a top tier athlete.

Learn more about Wired to Eat, including the special launch bonuses!

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Robb Wolf:

[00:00:41] Robb’s first book was The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet (2010).

[00:01:31] The Paleo Solution podcast.

[00:01:51] Amelia Luker, RN, is my ultra hard working employee #1 who makes much of the NBT of the magic happen.

[00:02:44] Marty Kendall has a fantastic website and Facebook group both named Optimising Nutrition.

[00:04:25] Sign up for our weekly highlights email.

[00:05:35] The first book was so successful, why write a second?

[00:06:38] Customisation was lacking in the original approach.

[00:07:21] Whole30.

[00:08:09] We are wired to eat.

[00:10:52] Most health and fitness books are ghostwritten.

[00:12:55] Why not a retreat, or a training course, or self-publish?

[00:13:56] Tucker Max: Book in a Box.

[00:14:46] Reno Risk Assessment Program (explicit).

[00:15:45] Lorain Cordain and Gary Taubes.

[00:15:53] Dr Jim Greenwald.

[00:16:30] 22M savings, 33:1 return on investment.

[00:17:04] Dr Gerald Reaven.

[00:18:51] Workman's comp 1.5M cost?

[00:21:20] Train the trainer.

[00:24:06] Biomarkers to identify “the dead man walking.”

[00:24:46] William Cromwell, MD, Discipline Director, Cardiovascular Disease at LabCorp.

[00:25:26] LDL-P.

[00:27:14] Ivor Cummins (aka The Fat Emperor), and the late Dr Joseph Kraft.

[00:28:29] Book pre-order bonuses.

[00:30:12] Thrive Market.

[00:32:16] The Paleo Diet is “more misunderstood than a goth kid in Arkansas.”

[00:32:41] Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

[00:34:29] Zeevi, David, et al. "Personalized nutrition by prediction of glycemic responses." Cell 163.5 (2015): 1079-1094.

[00:37:39] Glucose challenge in hunter gathers.

[00:38:58] Does one size fit all for glucose tolerance?

[00:40:56] Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:46:00] The septic patient. See Robb’s talk at UCSF.

[00:46:32] Lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

[00:50:58] Straub, Rainer H., and Carsten Schradin. "Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs." Evolution, medicine, and public health 2016.1 (2016): 37-51.

[00:54:52] Managing complexity.

[00:57:08] Photoperiod.

[00:58:27] Crossfit and martial arts.

[00:59:56] What should I do when I grow up?

[01:00:18] Myers-Briggs personality test.

[01:01:39] Economic risk tolerance.

[01:02:34] Physician's assistant.

[01:04:58] Cleveland Clinic Functional Medicine.

[01:05:11] Kresser Institute.

[01:06:10] Rheumatoid arthritis.

[01:07:33] f you own a gym or other business and would like to sell copies of Wired To Eat you can pre-order in bulk! Please send email to hello@robbwolf.com with “Bulk order” in the subject line for details.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Robb.Wolf.on.2017-02-22.at.08.59.mp3 Thu, 16 Mar 2017 11:03:17 GMT Christopher Kelly In 2010, with his New York Times Bestselling book The Paleo Solution, Robb Wolf presented the answers that enabled me to recover my health. His podcast of the same name launched my business and connected me with the incredible partners who helped shape NBT into an online clinic that has now helped over a thousand athletes achieve optimal health and performance.

In his new book, Wired to Eat, Robb carefully examines the neuroregulation of appetite as this is necessary for eating enough to be healthy, but not so much that we see weight gain and the plethora of Western degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration and type 2 diabetes.

Robb's primary goal with this material is to remove the guilt and shame many people feel around making changes in their food and movement. We STILL need to do the work, but if we understand this may legitimately be a challenging process, we can avoid the sense of failure and self-loathing. Mixed into all this Robb talks about sleep, photoperiod, stress, digestion, the gut microbiome, autoimmunity. It’s a lot of material, but we think it covers most situations and will be helpful whether one is struggling with weight or is a top tier athlete.

Learn more about Wired to Eat, including the special launch bonuses!

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Robb Wolf:

[00:00:41] Robb’s first book was The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet (2010).

[00:01:31] The Paleo Solution podcast.

[00:01:51] Amelia Luker, RN, is my ultra hard working employee #1 who makes much of the NBT of the magic happen.

[00:02:44] Marty Kendall has a fantastic website and Facebook group both named Optimising Nutrition.

[00:04:25] Sign up for our weekly highlights email.

[00:05:35] The first book was so successful, why write a second?

[00:06:38] Customisation was lacking in the original approach.

[00:07:21] Whole30.

[00:08:09] We are wired to eat.

[00:10:52] Most health and fitness books are ghostwritten.

[00:12:55] Why not a retreat, or a training course, or self-publish?

[00:13:56] Tucker Max: Book in a Box.

[00:14:46] Reno Risk Assessment Program (explicit).

[00:15:45] Lorain Cordain and Gary Taubes.

[00:15:53] Dr Jim Greenwald.

[00:16:30] 22M savings, 33:1 return on investment.

[00:17:04] Dr Gerald Reaven.

[00:18:51] Workman's comp 1.5M cost?

[00:21:20] Train the trainer.

[00:24:06] Biomarkers to identify “the dead man walking.”

[00:24:46] William Cromwell, MD, Discipline Director, Cardiovascular Disease at LabCorp.

[00:25:26] LDL-P.

[00:27:14] Ivor Cummins (aka The Fat Emperor), and the late Dr Joseph Kraft.

[00:28:29] Book pre-order bonuses.

[00:30:12] Thrive Market.

[00:32:16] The Paleo Diet is “more misunderstood than a goth kid in Arkansas.”

[00:32:41] Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

[00:34:29] Zeevi, David, et al. "Personalized nutrition by prediction of glycemic responses." Cell 163.5 (2015): 1079-1094.

[00:37:39] Glucose challenge in hunter gathers.

[00:38:58] Does one size fit all for glucose tolerance?

[00:40:56] Chris Masterjohn, PhD.

[00:46:00] The septic patient. See Robb’s talk at UCSF.

[00:46:32] Lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

[00:50:58] Straub, Rainer H., and Carsten Schradin. "Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs." Evolution, medicine, and public health 2016.1 (2016): 37-51.

[00:54:52] Managing complexity.

[00:57:08] Photoperiod.

[00:58:27] Crossfit and martial arts.

[00:59:56] What should I do when I grow up?

[01:00:18] Myers-Briggs personality test.

[01:01:39] Economic risk tolerance.

[01:02:34] Physician's assistant.

[01:04:58] Cleveland Clinic Functional Medicine.

[01:05:11] Kresser Institute.

[01:06:10] Rheumatoid arthritis.

[01:07:33] f you own a gym or other business and would like to sell copies of Wired To Eat you can pre-order in bulk! Please send email to hello@robbwolf.com with “Bulk order” in the subject line for details.

]]>
yes
Is Your Skin Missing This Essential Peacekeeping Bacteria? https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mother.Dirt.on.2017-02-15.at.10.32.mp3 Jasmina Aganovic is a cosmetics and consumer goods entrepreneur who received her degree in chemical and biological engineering from MIT, and she’s back on the podcast to talk about the progress AOBiome have made with their clinical trials. In this interview, we focus mostly on the potential treatment of acne and hypertension, but trials are also underway for allergies, eczema, wound healing, migraines and temperature regulation.

Mother Dirt is the company focussed on commercialising the research of AOBiome, and I’ve been using their AO+ Mist spray product for over two years for the successful prevention of nappy (diaper) rash, saddle sores, and acne caused by bike helmets. I’ve also been using the spray in the place of a deodorant, and so far my wife hasn’t divorced me. Jasmina wanted to make it clear that although my N=1 experiences are exciting, nothing has been FDA approved.

Head over to Mother Dirt and take advantage of the generous 25% discount on offer. Use the code NBT25.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jasmina Aganovic:

[00:03:43] Environmental changes are leading to the loss of the ammonia oxidising (AO) bacteria.

[00:05:14] Nitrogen cycle.

[00:07:18] David Whitlock is the Inventor and co-founder of AOBiome.

[00:07:34] Why horses roll in the dirt in March?

[00:08:36] The link between the skin and the soil.

[00:09:36] Developing a bioreactor.

[00:10:28] Nappy rash.

[00:11:05] Bicycle helmets.

[00:13:11] The scientific process to validate the claims.

[00:13:55] Phase II trials for acne.

[00:14:26] A potential replacement for antiperspirant deodorant.

[00:14:50] Prevention of saddle sores.

[00:15:36] The war on P. acne.

[00:16:49] It's all about balance.

[00:17:23] C. diff overgrowths.

[00:18:49] Mechanism of action: acid, base balance.

[00:19:44] Nitrite and Nitric oxide.

[00:20:55] Not nitrous oxide! Which mucks up methylation by oxidising cobalamin.

[00:21:52] Hypertension.

[00:24:05] Highlights sign-up.

[00:25:09] Can nitric oxide made by the bacteria on the skin become systemic?

[00:26:47] Why FDA approval.

[00:29:37] Adverse events.

[00:30:47] Drug: B244 on clinicaltrials.gov.

[00:31:16] Romaine Bardet came 2nd in the Tour de France.

[00:32:28] Increasing O2 deliverability.

[00:33:46] Personal care product compatibility.

[00:34:11] Surfactant sodium octyl sulfate (SOS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants.

[00:35:13] Castille and neem soap.

[00:36:11] Nurses and hand sanitisers.

[00:37:59] http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/dirt/ use discount code NBT25.

[00:38:35] Mother Dirt is the consumer-facing site, to learn about the clinical research go to AOBiome.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mother.Dirt.on.2017-02-15.at.10.32.mp3 Thu, 09 Mar 2017 18:03:42 GMT Christopher Kelly Jasmina Aganovic is a cosmetics and consumer goods entrepreneur who received her degree in chemical and biological engineering from MIT, and she’s back on the podcast to talk about the progress AOBiome have made with their clinical trials. In this interview, we focus mostly on the potential treatment of acne and hypertension, but trials are also underway for allergies, eczema, wound healing, migraines and temperature regulation.

Mother Dirt is the company focussed on commercialising the research of AOBiome, and I’ve been using their AO+ Mist spray product for over two years for the successful prevention of nappy (diaper) rash, saddle sores, and acne caused by bike helmets. I’ve also been using the spray in the place of a deodorant, and so far my wife hasn’t divorced me. Jasmina wanted to make it clear that although my N=1 experiences are exciting, nothing has been FDA approved.

Head over to Mother Dirt and take advantage of the generous 25% discount on offer. Use the code NBT25.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  • One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  • One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  • One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jasmina Aganovic:

[00:03:43] Environmental changes are leading to the loss of the ammonia oxidising (AO) bacteria.

[00:05:14] Nitrogen cycle.

[00:07:18] David Whitlock is the Inventor and co-founder of AOBiome.

[00:07:34] Why horses roll in the dirt in March?

[00:08:36] The link between the skin and the soil.

[00:09:36] Developing a bioreactor.

[00:10:28] Nappy rash.

[00:11:05] Bicycle helmets.

[00:13:11] The scientific process to validate the claims.

[00:13:55] Phase II trials for acne.

[00:14:26] A potential replacement for antiperspirant deodorant.

[00:14:50] Prevention of saddle sores.

[00:15:36] The war on P. acne.

[00:16:49] It's all about balance.

[00:17:23] C. diff overgrowths.

[00:18:49] Mechanism of action: acid, base balance.

[00:19:44] Nitrite and Nitric oxide.

[00:20:55] Not nitrous oxide! Which mucks up methylation by oxidising cobalamin.

[00:21:52] Hypertension.

[00:24:05] Highlights sign-up.

[00:25:09] Can nitric oxide made by the bacteria on the skin become systemic?

[00:26:47] Why FDA approval.

[00:29:37] Adverse events.

[00:30:47] Drug: B244 on clinicaltrials.gov.

[00:31:16] Romaine Bardet came 2nd in the Tour de France.

[00:32:28] Increasing O2 deliverability.

[00:33:46] Personal care product compatibility.

[00:34:11] Surfactant sodium octyl sulfate (SOS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants.

[00:35:13] Castille and neem soap.

[00:36:11] Nurses and hand sanitisers.

[00:37:59] http://www.nourishbalancethrive.com/dirt/ use discount code NBT25.

[00:38:35] Mother Dirt is the consumer-facing site, to learn about the clinical research go to AOBiome.

]]>
clean
The Importance of Strength Training for Endurance Athletes https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.T.Nelson.on.2017-02-14.at.11.00.mp3 Since starting NBT, I’ve noticed a growing gap between what I'm doing (lots of cycling) and what I need to be doing for longevity (strength training). This year then, I plan to focus more on strength. The trouble is, I've no clue what I'm doing! Luckily, I was able to hire Dr Mike T Nelson, PhD as my strength and conditioning coach.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  1. One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  2. One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  3. One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

You should listen to this interview to learn why all athletes, including endurance athletes, should be strength training. I started Dr Mike's programme about six weeks before recording which meant I had lots of questions and honest feedback.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Mike T Nelson, PhD:

[00:00:56] First interview: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea…

[00:03:31] Reconciling multiple coaches.

[00:03:45] Setting goals.

[00:04:27] Strength for longevity.

[00:04:47] Dr Andy Galpin, PhD.

[00:05:32] All athletes should be strength training.

[00:08:10] Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:09:47] Biomechanics.

[00:11:07] Reducing risk of injury.

[00:11:32] Deadlifts.

[00:13:32] Don't squat the weight up!

[00:15:00] Don't copy powerlifters.

[00:15:52] Video: Dr Mike analysing my deadlift and his own.

[00:18:54] Psoas muscle.

[00:20:21] Warming up.

[00:21:15] RPR: reflexive performance reset.

[00:23:10] Quadratus lumborum (QL) muscle.

[00:24:32] Sets and rep ranges.

[00:26:08] Linear progression of volume.

[00:29:04] Monitoring fatigue.

[00:29:40] Heart rate variability (HRV) see my interview with Jason Moore of Elite HRV.

[00:30:25] Recording sets and reps, software.

[00:31:56] Volume, intensity, and density (volume / time).

[00:35:43] Strength vs endurance effects on HRV.

[00:37:06] Terzis, Gerasimos, et al. "Early phase interference between low-intensity running and power training in moderately trained females." European journal of applied physiology 116.5 (2016): 1063-1073. Coffey, Vernon G., and John A. Hawley. "Concurrent exercise training: do opposites distract?." The Journal of physiology (2016).

[00:39:22] Endurance volume.

[00:40:15] Session quality and progressive overload.

[00:41:20] 10% drop off for intervals.

[00:42:31] Issurin residual training effects chart.

[00:45:41] Dr Ben Peterson, PhD.

[00:46:28] MAF pace.

[00:47:12] Biofeedback range of motion test.

[00:47:54] Sumo vs conventional deadlift

[00:50:58] John Meadows - Meadows’s Row.

[00:51:56] Plate press--work with an open palm.

[00:54:21] Front squat.

[00:54:45] Zercher squat.

[00:55:03] Zombie front squat

[00:57:58] Rubix cube back squat.

[00:59:19] Chin-ups and pull-ups.

[01:00:59] Mike has two spots open.

[01:01:24] http://miketnelson.com/muscle

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.T.Nelson.on.2017-02-14.at.11.00.mp3 Thu, 02 Mar 2017 07:03:40 GMT Christopher Kelly Since starting NBT, I’ve noticed a growing gap between what I'm doing (lots of cycling) and what I need to be doing for longevity (strength training). This year then, I plan to focus more on strength. The trouble is, I've no clue what I'm doing! Luckily, I was able to hire Dr Mike T Nelson, PhD as my strength and conditioning coach.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  1. One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  2. One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  3. One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

You should listen to this interview to learn why all athletes, including endurance athletes, should be strength training. I started Dr Mike's programme about six weeks before recording which meant I had lots of questions and honest feedback.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Mike T Nelson, PhD:

[00:00:56] First interview: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea…

[00:03:31] Reconciling multiple coaches.

[00:03:45] Setting goals.

[00:04:27] Strength for longevity.

[00:04:47] Dr Andy Galpin, PhD.

[00:05:32] All athletes should be strength training.

[00:08:10] Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:09:47] Biomechanics.

[00:11:07] Reducing risk of injury.

[00:11:32] Deadlifts.

[00:13:32] Don't squat the weight up!

[00:15:00] Don't copy powerlifters.

[00:15:52] Video: Dr Mike analysing my deadlift and his own.

[00:18:54] Psoas muscle.

[00:20:21] Warming up.

[00:21:15] RPR: reflexive performance reset.

[00:23:10] Quadratus lumborum (QL) muscle.

[00:24:32] Sets and rep ranges.

[00:26:08] Linear progression of volume.

[00:29:04] Monitoring fatigue.

[00:29:40] Heart rate variability (HRV) see my interview with Jason Moore of Elite HRV.

[00:30:25] Recording sets and reps, software.

[00:31:56] Volume, intensity, and density (volume / time).

[00:35:43] Strength vs endurance effects on HRV.

[00:37:06] Terzis, Gerasimos, et al. "Early phase interference between low-intensity running and power training in moderately trained females." European journal of applied physiology 116.5 (2016): 1063-1073. Coffey, Vernon G., and John A. Hawley. "Concurrent exercise training: do opposites distract?." The Journal of physiology (2016).

[00:39:22] Endurance volume.

[00:40:15] Session quality and progressive overload.

[00:41:20] 10% drop off for intervals.

[00:42:31] Issurin residual training effects chart.

[00:45:41] Dr Ben Peterson, PhD.

[00:46:28] MAF pace.

[00:47:12] Biofeedback range of motion test.

[00:47:54] Sumo vs conventional deadlift

[00:50:58] John Meadows - Meadows’s Row.

[00:51:56] Plate press--work with an open palm.

[00:54:21] Front squat.

[00:54:45] Zercher squat.

[00:55:03] Zombie front squat

[00:57:58] Rubix cube back squat.

[00:59:19] Chin-ups and pull-ups.

[01:00:59] Mike has two spots open.

[01:01:24] http://miketnelson.com/muscle

]]>
clean
Specialists, Synthesizers, and Popularizers with Drs. Wood and Gerstmar https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Tim.Gerstmar.02.15.2017.mp3 This episode is syndicated from Dr Tim Gerstmar Aspire Natural Health podcast. We love Dr Gerstmar and would highly recommend you subscribe to his show.

You should listen to this episode to get a fly-on-the-wall perspective of two brilliant doctors with different backgrounds problem-solving using similar techniques.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  1. One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  2. One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  3. One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Drs Tommy Wood and Tim Gerstmar:

[00:00:48] Highlights email sign up.

[00:04:02] Protocols vs. basic science education and principles.

[00:06:05] Cooks and chefs.

[00:07:18] Tim's previous appearances on my podcast: How to Test and Predict Blood, Urine and Stool for Health, Longevity and Performance and Methylation and Environmental Pollutants with Dr. Tim Gerstmar.

[00:07:53] Tommy's background and path into medicine.

[00:09:03] Internal and emergency medicine.

[00:09:35] Tommy recently successfully defended his PhD.

[00:10:13] Emergency vs. health care

[00:10:41] Examining the root cause of multiple sclerosis using engineering techniques (paper, talk for the public, talk for physicians).

[00:11:30] Tommy's blog and podcast.

[00:11:53] Robb Wolf’s Paleo Solution podcast.

[00:12:21] Kalish Institute for Functional Medicine.

[00:13:28] Applying knowledge in the real world.

[00:13:50] PubMed warrior.

[00:14:37] The sexy abstract.

[00:16:52] Ivor Cummins, aka The Fat Emperor.

[00:18:29] The popularisers.

[00:19:04] Seattle.

[00:20:04] Neonatal neuroprotection.

[00:21:18] Dale Bredesen's protocol to reverse Alzheimer's.

[00:21:49] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:21:59] Bredesen, Dale E. "Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program." Aging (Albany NY) 6.9 (2014): 707-717.

[00:22:36] Bredesen, Dale E. "Metabolic profiling distinguishes three subtypes of Alzheimer's disease." Aging (Albany NY) 7.8 (2015): 595-600.

[00:23:36] Cytoplan supplements.

[00:24:40] Dementia screen.

[00:25:34] Requesting an MRI.

[00:26:07] B12, folate, vitamin D.

[00:27:08] Health insurance companies are not incentivised for the long term.

[00:30:09] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:31:34] Article: How Iceland Got Teens to Say No to Drugs - The Atlantic.

[00:33:07] Wasting willpower on diet, the importance of family buy-in.

[00:36:04] Communal eating.

[00:36:32] Ludvigsson, Jonas F., et al. "Increased suicide risk in coeliac disease—a Swedish nationwide cohort study." Digestive and Liver Disease 43.8 (2011): 616-622.

[00:38:24] The psychological cost of achieving physical perfection.

[00:39:23] There is no biological free lunch.

[00:40:07] Book: The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal.

[00:41:17] Orthorexia.

[00:42:34] The goal is balance.

[00:44:00] Health Unplugged, Darryl Edwards.

[00:46:09] About NBT.

[00:48:53] Simple Guide to the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol.

[00:49:04] Jamie Kendall-Weed, MD.

[00:50:15] The basics are the same for everyone.

[00:51:18] The plant analogy of health.

[00:52:26] The Foundations of Health.

[00:53:20] Even coaches need coaches.

[00:54:25] Functional Forum.

[00:56:21] Medical doctors are trapped in a system that doesn't work.

[00:57:39] Integrative psychologist.

[00:59:17] Telemedicine.

[01:01:19] Most of what we do doesn't require a doctor, but sometimes we make a referral.

[01:02:56] The Bredesen Protocol is evidence-based medicine.

[01:05:37] The alternative world needs to publish.

[01:09:31] Chiropractor on Tim's podcast "driving out chiros out of practice"

[01:13:00] No one has all the answers

[01:15:27] Dr Ragnar on Facebook and Twitter.

 
]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Tim.Gerstmar.02.15.2017.mp3 Thu, 23 Feb 2017 13:02:58 GMT Christopher Kelly This episode is syndicated from Dr Tim Gerstmar Aspire Natural Health podcast. We love Dr Gerstmar and would highly recommend you subscribe to his show.

You should listen to this episode to get a fly-on-the-wall perspective of two brilliant doctors with different backgrounds problem-solving using similar techniques.

Sign up for our Highlights email and every week we’ll send you a short (but sweet) email containing the following:

  1. One piece of simple, actionable advice to improve your health and performance, including the reference(s) to back it up.
  2. One item we read or saw in the health and fitness world recently that we would like to give a different perspective on, and why.
  3. One awesome thing that we think you’ll enjoy!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Drs Tommy Wood and Tim Gerstmar:

[00:00:48] Highlights email sign up.

[00:04:02] Protocols vs. basic science education and principles.

[00:06:05] Cooks and chefs.

[00:07:18] Tim's previous appearances on my podcast: How to Test and Predict Blood, Urine and Stool for Health, Longevity and Performance and Methylation and Environmental Pollutants with Dr. Tim Gerstmar.

[00:07:53] Tommy's background and path into medicine.

[00:09:03] Internal and emergency medicine.

[00:09:35] Tommy recently successfully defended his PhD.

[00:10:13] Emergency vs. health care

[00:10:41] Examining the root cause of multiple sclerosis using engineering techniques (paper, talk for the public, talk for physicians).

[00:11:30] Tommy's blog and podcast.

[00:11:53] Robb Wolf’s Paleo Solution podcast.

[00:12:21] Kalish Institute for Functional Medicine.

[00:13:28] Applying knowledge in the real world.

[00:13:50] PubMed warrior.

[00:14:37] The sexy abstract.

[00:16:52] Ivor Cummins, aka The Fat Emperor.

[00:18:29] The popularisers.

[00:19:04] Seattle.

[00:20:04] Neonatal neuroprotection.

[00:21:18] Dale Bredesen's protocol to reverse Alzheimer's.

[00:21:49] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:21:59] Bredesen, Dale E. "Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program." Aging (Albany NY) 6.9 (2014): 707-717.

[00:22:36] Bredesen, Dale E. "Metabolic profiling distinguishes three subtypes of Alzheimer's disease." Aging (Albany NY) 7.8 (2015): 595-600.

[00:23:36] Cytoplan supplements.

[00:24:40] Dementia screen.

[00:25:34] Requesting an MRI.

[00:26:07] B12, folate, vitamin D.

[00:27:08] Health insurance companies are not incentivised for the long term.

[00:30:09] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:31:34] Article: How Iceland Got Teens to Say No to Drugs - The Atlantic.

[00:33:07] Wasting willpower on diet, the importance of family buy-in.

[00:36:04] Communal eating.

[00:36:32] Ludvigsson, Jonas F., et al. "Increased suicide risk in coeliac disease—a Swedish nationwide cohort study." Digestive and Liver Disease 43.8 (2011): 616-622.

[00:38:24] The psychological cost of achieving physical perfection.

[00:39:23] There is no biological free lunch.

[00:40:07] Book: The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal.

[00:41:17] Orthorexia.

[00:42:34] The goal is balance.

[00:44:00] Health Unplugged, Darryl Edwards.

[00:46:09] About NBT.

[00:48:53] Simple Guide to the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol.

[00:49:04] Jamie Kendall-Weed, MD.

[00:50:15] The basics are the same for everyone.

[00:51:18] The plant analogy of health.

[00:52:26] The Foundations of Health.

[00:53:20] Even coaches need coaches.

[00:54:25] Functional Forum.

[00:56:21] Medical doctors are trapped in a system that doesn't work.

[00:57:39] Integrative psychologist.

[00:59:17] Telemedicine.

[01:01:19] Most of what we do doesn't require a doctor, but sometimes we make a referral.

[01:02:56] The Bredesen Protocol is evidence-based medicine.

[01:05:37] The alternative world needs to publish.

[01:09:31] Chiropractor on Tim's podcast "driving out chiros out of practice"

[01:13:00] No one has all the answers

[01:15:27] Dr Ragnar on Facebook and Twitter.

 
]]>
clean
Five Things Every Athlete Needs to Do to Succeed https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-02-06.at.18.01.mp3 Sign up for our highlights email and each week we’ll send you:

  1. An interesting scientific paper we've read with actionable advice.
  2. Nonsense we read/heard this week and why it's nonsense.
  3. Something awesome we read/listened to this week and why it's awesome.

I was inspired to record this podcast by a discussion that took place on the Lower Insulin Facebook group. I love the conversation that goes on over there, but like many of debates we see around the Internet, the conversation is somewhat one-dimensional. Low-carb, high-fat, moderate protein, intermittent fasting and you'll be okay. After working with close to 1,000 athletes to improve their health, performance and longevity, we know that's not always true, and we’re confident that a complete solution must give consideration to everything we outline in this episode.

The five things (in no particular order):

1. Eat a minimally processed diet food free of added sugar and vegetable oils (processed fats).

Because processed foods:

  • Are less nutrient-dense.
  • Are designed to make you overeat.
  • Increase insulin responses due to processing.
  • Alter the gut microbiota unfavourably.
  • Translocate endotoxins such as LPS across the gut wall. This induces inflammation and hyperinsulinaemia.
  • Induce leptin and insulin resistance centrally which leads to overeating.

2. Get sufficient sleep and Sunlight!

3. Appropriately manage stress, social connectedness and purpose. Consider stress of dieting.

4. Move like a human, i.e. walk, stand, and occasionally lift heavy things.

5. Consider magnesium and zinc deficiency (especially in athletes).

If you’re an athlete and you’re doing all of the above (and I mean doing not knowing) and you’re still not meeting your goals then we should talk! Book a free consultation online.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD:

[00:00:34] Tommy's PhD defence.

[00:04:32] Low Carb Breckenridge 2017.

[00:04:43] Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP.

[00:06:07] LPS (endotoxin) translocation across the gut wall.

[00:07:28] Coronary artery calcium score, see The Widowmaker movie.

[00:09:12] Functional Blood Chemistry Presented by: Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:10:32] Lower Insulin Facebook group.

[00:11:49] Minimally processed diet free of added sugar and processed fats.

[00:15:46] The gut microbiome, insulin and leptin resistance.

[00:16:11] Emulsifiers.

[00:16:47] Gluten, dairy, soy and eggs.

[00:18:06] Food sensitivity testing.

[00:19:14] Podcast with Dr Ellen Langer, PhD: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster.

[00:19:58] ALCAT and MRT food sensitivity tests.

[00:22:21] Nutrition, Paleolithic. "A consideration of its nature and current implications." New England Journal of Medicine 312.5 (1985): 283-9.

[00:22:35] Sleep.

[00:25:33] Podcast: How to Get Perfect Sleep with Dr Kirk Parsley, MD.

[00:26:51] Breaking the vicious sleep cycle.

[00:27:08] Podcast with Dr Chris Masterjohn, PhD: Why We Get Fat and What You Should Really Do About It.

[00:27:20] Photoperiod: go the fuck outside already.

[00:28:43] F.lux et al.

[00:29:01] Yoon, In-Young, et al. "Luteinizing hormone following light exposure in healthy young men." Neuroscience letters 341.1 (2003): 25-28.

[00:30:57] Stress.

[00:31:09] Podcast with Dr Bryan Walsh: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About.

[00:32:05] Purpose.

[00:35:54] Sir Ken Robinson, PhD: books and TED Talk.

[00:36:34] Book: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers by Dr Robert M. Sapolsky, PhD.

[00:38:20] Headspace, Calm.

[00:39:30] Movement, especially walking.

[00:40:34] Podcasts with Katy Bowman and Dr Kelly Starrett.

[00:41:02] Getting a dog.

[00:43:07] Ivor Cummins: magnesium and zinc deficiency.

[00:44:31] Highlights email sign-up.

[00:47:38] Testing. See podcast with Dr Bill Shaw: Surviving in a Toxic World: Nonmetal Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health.

[00:48:17] Podcast with Todd Becker: Getting Stronger.

[00:48:36] Smoke from wood stove.

[00:49:12] Advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

[00:49:49] Allostatic load.

[00:50:11] Vlassara, Helen, et al. "Oral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial." Diabetologia 59.10 (2016): 2181-2192. And Uribarri, Jaime, et al. "Restriction of advanced glycation end products improves insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes." Diabetes care 34.7 (2011): 1610-1616.

[00:52:34] Helko Vario 2000 Heavy Log Splitter (maul).

[00:53:30] Podcast with Joshua Fields Millburn: Love People and Use Things (Because the Opposite Never Works).

[00:53:36] The Fireplace Delusion by Sam Harris. Naeher, Luke P., et al. "Woodsmoke health effects: a review." Inhalation toxicology 19.1 (2007): 67-106.

[00:53:59] Carmella, Steven G., et al. "Effects of smoking cessation on eight urinary tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers." Chemical research in toxicology 22.4 (2009): 734-741.

[00:55:33] Tommy's personal blog. Trumble, Benjamin C., et al. "Age-independent increases in male salivary testosterone during horticultural activity among Tsimane forager-farmers." Evolution and Human Behavior 34.5 (2013): 350-357.

[01:00:43] Personal care products, see the EWG’s Skin Deep database.

[01:01:36] Stool testing.

[01:01:47] GI-MAP.

[01:02:43] Blastocystis parasite blog.

[01:03:20] Rajič, Borko, et al. "Eradication of Blastocystis hominis prevents the development of symptomatic Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: a case report." The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries 9.07 (2015): 788-791.

[01:05:31] Doctor's Data test.

[01:05:40] Cyclospora parasite.

[01:06:52] Jones, Kathleen R., Jeannette M. Whitmire, and D. Scott Merrell. "A tale of two toxins: Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA modulate host pathways that impact disease." Frontiers in microbiology 1 (2010): 115.

[01:08:22] Biocidin liquid.

[01:09:18] Book a free consultation.

[01:10:47] If I don’t have the answer, then Tommy will, and if he doesn’t then someone I’ve interviewed will, so if you work with me you know you’re going to get fixed no matter what.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2017-02-06.at.18.01.mp3 Fri, 17 Feb 2017 08:02:41 GMT Christopher Kelly Sign up for our highlights email and each week we’ll send you:

  1. An interesting scientific paper we've read with actionable advice.
  2. Nonsense we read/heard this week and why it's nonsense.
  3. Something awesome we read/listened to this week and why it's awesome.

I was inspired to record this podcast by a discussion that took place on the Lower Insulin Facebook group. I love the conversation that goes on over there, but like many of debates we see around the Internet, the conversation is somewhat one-dimensional. Low-carb, high-fat, moderate protein, intermittent fasting and you'll be okay. After working with close to 1,000 athletes to improve their health, performance and longevity, we know that's not always true, and we’re confident that a complete solution must give consideration to everything we outline in this episode.

The five things (in no particular order):

1. Eat a minimally processed diet food free of added sugar and vegetable oils (processed fats).

Because processed foods:

  • Are less nutrient-dense.
  • Are designed to make you overeat.
  • Increase insulin responses due to processing.
  • Alter the gut microbiota unfavourably.
  • Translocate endotoxins such as LPS across the gut wall. This induces inflammation and hyperinsulinaemia.
  • Induce leptin and insulin resistance centrally which leads to overeating.

2. Get sufficient sleep and Sunlight!

3. Appropriately manage stress, social connectedness and purpose. Consider stress of dieting.

4. Move like a human, i.e. walk, stand, and occasionally lift heavy things.

5. Consider magnesium and zinc deficiency (especially in athletes).

If you’re an athlete and you’re doing all of the above (and I mean doing not knowing) and you’re still not meeting your goals then we should talk! Book a free consultation online.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tommy Wood, MD, PhD:

[00:00:34] Tommy's PhD defence.

[00:04:32] Low Carb Breckenridge 2017.

[00:04:43] Dr Jeffry N. Gerber, MD, FAAFP.

[00:06:07] LPS (endotoxin) translocation across the gut wall.

[00:07:28] Coronary artery calcium score, see The Widowmaker movie.

[00:09:12] Functional Blood Chemistry Presented by: Dr Bryan Walsh.

[00:10:32] Lower Insulin Facebook group.

[00:11:49] Minimally processed diet free of added sugar and processed fats.

[00:15:46] The gut microbiome, insulin and leptin resistance.

[00:16:11] Emulsifiers.

[00:16:47] Gluten, dairy, soy and eggs.

[00:18:06] Food sensitivity testing.

[00:19:14] Podcast with Dr Ellen Langer, PhD: How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster.

[00:19:58] ALCAT and MRT food sensitivity tests.

[00:22:21] Nutrition, Paleolithic. "A consideration of its nature and current implications." New England Journal of Medicine 312.5 (1985): 283-9.

[00:22:35] Sleep.

[00:25:33] Podcast: How to Get Perfect Sleep with Dr Kirk Parsley, MD.

[00:26:51] Breaking the vicious sleep cycle.

[00:27:08] Podcast with Dr Chris Masterjohn, PhD: Why We Get Fat and What You Should Really Do About It.

[00:27:20] Photoperiod: go the fuck outside already.

[00:28:43] F.lux et al.

[00:29:01] Yoon, In-Young, et al. "Luteinizing hormone following light exposure in healthy young men." Neuroscience letters 341.1 (2003): 25-28.

[00:30:57] Stress.

[00:31:09] Podcast with Dr Bryan Walsh: Social Isolation: The Most Important Topic Nobody is Talking About.

[00:32:05] Purpose.

[00:35:54] Sir Ken Robinson, PhD: books and TED Talk.

[00:36:34] Book: Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers by Dr Robert M. Sapolsky, PhD.

[00:38:20] Headspace, Calm.

[00:39:30] Movement, especially walking.

[00:40:34] Podcasts with Katy Bowman and Dr Kelly Starrett.

[00:41:02] Getting a dog.

[00:43:07] Ivor Cummins: magnesium and zinc deficiency.

[00:44:31] Highlights email sign-up.

[00:47:38] Testing. See podcast with Dr Bill Shaw: Surviving in a Toxic World: Nonmetal Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health.

[00:48:17] Podcast with Todd Becker: Getting Stronger.

[00:48:36] Smoke from wood stove.

[00:49:12] Advanced glycation end products (AGEs).

[00:49:49] Allostatic load.

[00:50:11] Vlassara, Helen, et al. "Oral AGE restriction ameliorates insulin resistance in obese individuals with the metabolic syndrome: a randomised controlled trial." Diabetologia 59.10 (2016): 2181-2192. And Uribarri, Jaime, et al. "Restriction of advanced glycation end products improves insulin resistance in human type 2 diabetes." Diabetes care 34.7 (2011): 1610-1616.

[00:52:34] Helko Vario 2000 Heavy Log Splitter (maul).

[00:53:30] Podcast with Joshua Fields Millburn: Love People and Use Things (Because the Opposite Never Works).

[00:53:36] The Fireplace Delusion by Sam Harris. Naeher, Luke P., et al. "Woodsmoke health effects: a review." Inhalation toxicology 19.1 (2007): 67-106.

[00:53:59] Carmella, Steven G., et al. "Effects of smoking cessation on eight urinary tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers." Chemical research in toxicology 22.4 (2009): 734-741.

[00:55:33] Tommy's personal blog. Trumble, Benjamin C., et al. "Age-independent increases in male salivary testosterone during horticultural activity among Tsimane forager-farmers." Evolution and Human Behavior 34.5 (2013): 350-357.

[01:00:43] Personal care products, see the EWG’s Skin Deep database.

[01:01:36] Stool testing.

[01:01:47] GI-MAP.

[01:02:43] Blastocystis parasite blog.

[01:03:20] Rajič, Borko, et al. "Eradication of Blastocystis hominis prevents the development of symptomatic Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: a case report." The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries 9.07 (2015): 788-791.

[01:05:31] Doctor's Data test.

[01:05:40] Cyclospora parasite.

[01:06:52] Jones, Kathleen R., Jeannette M. Whitmire, and D. Scott Merrell. "A tale of two toxins: Helicobacter pylori CagA and VacA modulate host pathways that impact disease." Frontiers in microbiology 1 (2010): 115.

[01:08:22] Biocidin liquid.

[01:09:18] Book a free consultation.

[01:10:47] If I don’t have the answer, then Tommy will, and if he doesn’t then someone I’ve interviewed will, so if you work with me you know you’re going to get fixed no matter what.

]]>
yes
World Champion Rower and Ketone Monoester Researcher Brianna Stubbs https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Brianna.Stubbs.on.2017-01-11.at.11.53.mp3 Brianna Stubbs, PhD is an extraordinary woman on multiple levels. She was the youngest person ever to row across the English Channel, has represented GB at every age level and won gold at the World U23 Championships in 2013, and again at the senior level at the 2016 World Championships. Brianna will be looking to build on that success during the Tokyo 2020 Olympiad.

If that wasn’t enough, Brianna recently gained her PhD in Biochemical Physiology at Oxford University where she worked alongside Dr Kieran Clarke to develop a novel ketone monoester that has recently been shown to improve exercise performance in endurance athletes.

You should listen to this podcast to discover the special benefits of ketones and their supplementation.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Brianna Stubbs, PhD:

[00:01:10] Early rowing days.

[00:02:10] Different types of athlete: rowing versus sculling.

[00:03:14] Rowing training is mostly endurance, but the races are short.

[00:05:00] 24 mMol/L blood lactate!

[00:05:25] When Propel Coaching tested my lactate threshold I topped out at a measly 7.8.

[00:06:18] Lactate clearance.

[00:07:20] The road to medical school.

[00:08:52] Kieran Clarke, PhD.

[00:10:03] Juggling training and academic work.

[00:12:19] Working on the ketone monoester.

[00:12:39] Instant Ketosis: 0.4 to 6.2mM in 30 Minutes.

[00:12:49] Ketone salts.

[00:13:22] How ketone supplements improve athletic performance.

[00:14:39] Ketones spare protein.

[00:15:09] What type of events stand to benefit.

[00:16:37] Sweet spot 2-4 mM?

[00:17:16] Stellingwerff, Trent[Author] ? Ref

[00:18:14] Palatability and tolerability.

[00:20:11] What level of athlete stands to benefit?

[00:21:29] 2% cycling performance over a 1h TT. See Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:23:16] Diet vs supplements.

[00:24:22] Interview with Mike T. Nelson: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea…

[00:24:36] Monocarboxylate transporter.

[00:25:36] Randle cycle.

[00:27:32] Ketosis implies a bias towards fat!

[00:28:19] High glucose and ketones.

[00:28:38] Exogenous ketones lower glucose.

[00:29:42] Each person may be different.

[00:29:59] Applications outside of sports performance.

[00:31:48] Ketone supplements for weight loss.

[00:32:14] Gibson, A. A., et al. "Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta‐analysis." obesity reviews 16.1 (2015): 64-76. And Paoli, Antonio, et al. "Ketosis, ketogenic diet and food intake control: a complex relationship." (2015).

[00:33:07] Suppressed ghrelin.

[00:35:02] Plans for the future.

[00:36:23] Dominic D'Agostino. Lots of good interviews recently, including SNR #164: Dominic D’Agostino, PhD – Press-Pulse Model of Cancer Therapy, Ketones & Metabolic Drugs.

[00:36:38] Volek J[Author] & Phinney SD[Author].

[00:36:54] PHAT FIBRE study (in press).

[00:39:59] The Precision Xtra meter by Abbott measures only the physiological D-BHB.

[00:41:10] Mass spectrometry chiral analysis.

[00:41:49] Podcast: The Race to Make a Ketone Supplement, See Lincoln, Beth C., Christine Des Rosiers, and Henri Brunengraber. "Metabolism of S-3-hydroxybutyrate in the perfused rat liver." Archives of biochemistry and biophysics 259.1 (1987): 149-156.

[00:42:13] Hsu, Wei-Yu, et al. "Enantioselective determination of 3-hydroxybutyrate in the tissues of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats of different ages." Journal of Chromatography B 879.29 (2011): 3331-3336. And Tsai, Yih-Chiao, et al. "Stereoselective effects of 3-hydroxybutyrate on glucose utilization of rat cardiomyocytes." Life sciences 78.12 (2006): 1385-1391.

[00:46:39] Book: The Case Against Sugar by Gary Taubes.

[00:47:14] Chris Masterjohn exchanging nutritional bogeymen.

[00:48:32] Availability of the ketone monoester.

[00:49:22] Brianna Stubbs (@BriannaStubbs) on Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Brianna.Stubbs.on.2017-01-11.at.11.53.mp3 Fri, 10 Feb 2017 07:02:14 GMT Christopher Kelly Brianna Stubbs, PhD is an extraordinary woman on multiple levels. She was the youngest person ever to row across the English Channel, has represented GB at every age level and won gold at the World U23 Championships in 2013, and again at the senior level at the 2016 World Championships. Brianna will be looking to build on that success during the Tokyo 2020 Olympiad.

If that wasn’t enough, Brianna recently gained her PhD in Biochemical Physiology at Oxford University where she worked alongside Dr Kieran Clarke to develop a novel ketone monoester that has recently been shown to improve exercise performance in endurance athletes.

You should listen to this podcast to discover the special benefits of ketones and their supplementation.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Brianna Stubbs, PhD:

[00:01:10] Early rowing days.

[00:02:10] Different types of athlete: rowing versus sculling.

[00:03:14] Rowing training is mostly endurance, but the races are short.

[00:05:00] 24 mMol/L blood lactate!

[00:05:25] When Propel Coaching tested my lactate threshold I topped out at a measly 7.8.

[00:06:18] Lactate clearance.

[00:07:20] The road to medical school.

[00:08:52] Kieran Clarke, PhD.

[00:10:03] Juggling training and academic work.

[00:12:19] Working on the ketone monoester.

[00:12:39] Instant Ketosis: 0.4 to 6.2mM in 30 Minutes.

[00:12:49] Ketone salts.

[00:13:22] How ketone supplements improve athletic performance.

[00:14:39] Ketones spare protein.

[00:15:09] What type of events stand to benefit.

[00:16:37] Sweet spot 2-4 mM?

[00:17:16] Stellingwerff, Trent[Author] ? Ref

[00:18:14] Palatability and tolerability.

[00:20:11] What level of athlete stands to benefit?

[00:21:29] 2% cycling performance over a 1h TT. See Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:23:16] Diet vs supplements.

[00:24:22] Interview with Mike T. Nelson: High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea…

[00:24:36] Monocarboxylate transporter.

[00:25:36] Randle cycle.

[00:27:32] Ketosis implies a bias towards fat!

[00:28:19] High glucose and ketones.

[00:28:38] Exogenous ketones lower glucose.

[00:29:42] Each person may be different.

[00:29:59] Applications outside of sports performance.

[00:31:48] Ketone supplements for weight loss.

[00:32:14] Gibson, A. A., et al. "Do ketogenic diets really suppress appetite? A systematic review and meta‐analysis." obesity reviews 16.1 (2015): 64-76. And Paoli, Antonio, et al. "Ketosis, ketogenic diet and food intake control: a complex relationship." (2015).

[00:33:07] Suppressed ghrelin.

[00:35:02] Plans for the future.

[00:36:23] Dominic D'Agostino. Lots of good interviews recently, including SNR #164: Dominic D’Agostino, PhD – Press-Pulse Model of Cancer Therapy, Ketones & Metabolic Drugs.

[00:36:38] Volek J[Author] & Phinney SD[Author].

[00:36:54] PHAT FIBRE study (in press).

[00:39:59] The Precision Xtra meter by Abbott measures only the physiological D-BHB.

[00:41:10] Mass spectrometry chiral analysis.

[00:41:49] Podcast: The Race to Make a Ketone Supplement, See Lincoln, Beth C., Christine Des Rosiers, and Henri Brunengraber. "Metabolism of S-3-hydroxybutyrate in the perfused rat liver." Archives of biochemistry and biophysics 259.1 (1987): 149-156.

[00:42:13] Hsu, Wei-Yu, et al. "Enantioselective determination of 3-hydroxybutyrate in the tissues of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats of different ages." Journal of Chromatography B 879.29 (2011): 3331-3336. And Tsai, Yih-Chiao, et al. "Stereoselective effects of 3-hydroxybutyrate on glucose utilization of rat cardiomyocytes." Life sciences 78.12 (2006): 1385-1391.

[00:46:39] Book: The Case Against Sugar by Gary Taubes.

[00:47:14] Chris Masterjohn exchanging nutritional bogeymen.

[00:48:32] Availability of the ketone monoester.

[00:49:22] Brianna Stubbs (@BriannaStubbs) on Twitter.

]]>
clean
The Critical Role of Oestradiol for Women’s Cognition https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ann.Hathaway.on.2017-01-18.at.12.05.mp3 Dr Ann Hathaway, MD has been successfully treating women and men with bioidentical hormones and other natural remedies since 1995. She is a member of the prestigious Institute for Functional Medicine and is a director of the Orthomolecular Health Medicine Board.

Tommy and I met Dr Hathaway at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging where she presented this excellent and incredibly well-referenced talk on the role of oestradiol in cognition for women.

Dr Hathaway is primarily using blood testing to assess hormone levels. However, urinary metabolites can be very helpful for mapping out the oestrogens. At around the twenty-minute mark, this interview gets quite technical, and I think you'll find it useful to look at this section of a DUTCH report while listening to the audio. Notice the enzyme names are written on the arrows indicating the direction of metabolism. The word "hydroxy" is abbreviated OH, so when you hear Ann say "four hydroxy E1," look for 4-OH-E1 on the map.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Ann Hathaway, MD:

[00:01:35] Health problems not addressed well by the traditional system.

[00:03:13] A 1.5h first appointment in Functional Medicine is typical.

[00:04:25] Different types of practitioner.

[00:05:20] American Academy of Environmental Medicine.

[00:05:38] Jeffrey Bland, PhD.

[00:06:57] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:08:21] Principles for addressing hormone imbalance.

[00:09:41] Underlying root causes.

[00:10:40] Menopause and cognition.

[00:11:04] Oestradiol less than 20 pg/ml.

[00:13:11] The brain has oestradiol receptors.

[00:13:55] All of the neurotransmitter systems are favorably impacted by oestradiol. Acetylcholine, which is the neurotransmitter most associated with memory, serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine. All are enhanced by oestradiol.

[00:14:30] Rasgon, Natalie L., et al. "Prospective randomized trial to assess effects of continuing hormone therapy on cerebral function in postmenopausal women at risk for dementia." PloS one 9.3 (2014): e89095.

[00:15:22] The odds ratio for women to develop Alzheimer's disease is 1.56.

[00:16:21] Balancing oestradiol with progesterone and other hormones.

[00:17:17] Endometrial hyperplasia which can turn into uterine cancer.

[00:17:32] Progesterone improves sleep

[00:18:27] Different types of testing.

[00:19:08] Never give oestrone.

[00:19:27] Metabolites of oestrogen (see the diagram above).

[00:21:13] Some of the things that you can do to increase the 2-hydroxy pathway are eating a high cruciferous diet, taking a supplement called diindolylmethane or indole-3-carbinol.

[00:21:32] Iodine sufficiency.

[00:21:39] Lignans in flaxseed.

[00:22:04] COMT enzyme and methylation.

[00:22:47] Genetic mutations.

[00:23:55] CYP1B1.

[00:24:14] Xenoestrogens.

[00:24:34] Eat organic!

[00:24:52] Pharmaceuticals.

[00:26:14] Glutathione. See Why You Should Manage Your Glutathione Status and How to Do It.

[00:26:34] Alpha lipoic acid.

[00:27:07] NutrEval and ION panel

[00:27:42] Eating a wide variety of veg

[00:28:52] Personal care products and makeup

[00:29:07] Environmental Working Group (EWG).

[00:30:01] The Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHI).

[00:31:21] Small differences matter in pharmacology.

[00:33:37] Oestradiol should only be used topically.

[00:34:19] Wharton, Whitney, et al. "Potential role of estrogen in the pathobiology and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease." American journal of translational research 1.2 (2009): 131-147.

[00:36:22] Oral oestrogen increases C-reactive protein and fibrinogen.

[00:38:28] Harman, S. M., et al. "KEEPS: the Kronos early estrogen prevention study." (2005): 3-12.

[00:44:08] APOE gene.

[00:45:05] What to do if you're taking something other than topical oestradiol.

[00:46:06] See Rasgon study linked above.

[00:46:46] Ann’s presentation at the Buck Institute: Bioidentical Hormones and Cognition.

[00:46:52] Ann Hathaway MD--Integrative Functional Medicine & Bio-identical Hormones

[00:47:06] This interview was recorded in January 2017, at that time Ann was scheduling new patients in April.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ann.Hathaway.on.2017-01-18.at.12.05.mp3 Fri, 03 Feb 2017 07:02:22 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr Ann Hathaway, MD has been successfully treating women and men with bioidentical hormones and other natural remedies since 1995. She is a member of the prestigious Institute for Functional Medicine and is a director of the Orthomolecular Health Medicine Board.

Tommy and I met Dr Hathaway at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging where she presented this excellent and incredibly well-referenced talk on the role of oestradiol in cognition for women.

Dr Hathaway is primarily using blood testing to assess hormone levels. However, urinary metabolites can be very helpful for mapping out the oestrogens. At around the twenty-minute mark, this interview gets quite technical, and I think you'll find it useful to look at this section of a DUTCH report while listening to the audio. Notice the enzyme names are written on the arrows indicating the direction of metabolism. The word "hydroxy" is abbreviated OH, so when you hear Ann say "four hydroxy E1," look for 4-OH-E1 on the map.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Ann Hathaway, MD:

[00:01:35] Health problems not addressed well by the traditional system.

[00:03:13] A 1.5h first appointment in Functional Medicine is typical.

[00:04:25] Different types of practitioner.

[00:05:20] American Academy of Environmental Medicine.

[00:05:38] Jeffrey Bland, PhD.

[00:06:57] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:08:21] Principles for addressing hormone imbalance.

[00:09:41] Underlying root causes.

[00:10:40] Menopause and cognition.

[00:11:04] Oestradiol less than 20 pg/ml.

[00:13:11] The brain has oestradiol receptors.

[00:13:55] All of the neurotransmitter systems are favorably impacted by oestradiol. Acetylcholine, which is the neurotransmitter most associated with memory, serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine. All are enhanced by oestradiol.

[00:14:30] Rasgon, Natalie L., et al. "Prospective randomized trial to assess effects of continuing hormone therapy on cerebral function in postmenopausal women at risk for dementia." PloS one 9.3 (2014): e89095.

[00:15:22] The odds ratio for women to develop Alzheimer's disease is 1.56.

[00:16:21] Balancing oestradiol with progesterone and other hormones.

[00:17:17] Endometrial hyperplasia which can turn into uterine cancer.

[00:17:32] Progesterone improves sleep

[00:18:27] Different types of testing.

[00:19:08] Never give oestrone.

[00:19:27] Metabolites of oestrogen (see the diagram above).

[00:21:13] Some of the things that you can do to increase the 2-hydroxy pathway are eating a high cruciferous diet, taking a supplement called diindolylmethane or indole-3-carbinol.

[00:21:32] Iodine sufficiency.

[00:21:39] Lignans in flaxseed.

[00:22:04] COMT enzyme and methylation.

[00:22:47] Genetic mutations.

[00:23:55] CYP1B1.

[00:24:14] Xenoestrogens.

[00:24:34] Eat organic!

[00:24:52] Pharmaceuticals.

[00:26:14] Glutathione. See Why You Should Manage Your Glutathione Status and How to Do It.

[00:26:34] Alpha lipoic acid.

[00:27:07] NutrEval and ION panel

[00:27:42] Eating a wide variety of veg

[00:28:52] Personal care products and makeup

[00:29:07] Environmental Working Group (EWG).

[00:30:01] The Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHI).

[00:31:21] Small differences matter in pharmacology.

[00:33:37] Oestradiol should only be used topically.

[00:34:19] Wharton, Whitney, et al. "Potential role of estrogen in the pathobiology and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease." American journal of translational research 1.2 (2009): 131-147.

[00:36:22] Oral oestrogen increases C-reactive protein and fibrinogen.

[00:38:28] Harman, S. M., et al. "KEEPS: the Kronos early estrogen prevention study." (2005): 3-12.

[00:44:08] APOE gene.

[00:45:05] What to do if you're taking something other than topical oestradiol.

[00:46:06] See Rasgon study linked above.

[00:46:46] Ann’s presentation at the Buck Institute: Bioidentical Hormones and Cognition.

[00:46:52] Ann Hathaway MD--Integrative Functional Medicine & Bio-identical Hormones

[00:47:06] This interview was recorded in January 2017, at that time Ann was scheduling new patients in April.

]]>
clean
How to Use Biomedical Testing for Obstacle Course Racing Performance https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ryan.Baxter.on.2017-01-10.at.10.34.mp3 The ketogenic diet has many promising applications including better management of type 1 diabetes and as an adjunct cancer therapy. Thirty-five thousand people signed up for the Keto Summit where we talked about other applications including neurological diseases, fat loss and improved athletic performance. If you adopted a high-fat paleo-type diet, you could be forgiven for thinking that if that was good, then ketosis should be better. I know I did. Unfortunately, that isn’t necessarily the case, and recently in our practice, we’ve seen several athletes eating a diet that failed to fuel their activity. Obstacle course racing appears to be one type of event where carbohydrates are mandatory.

My guest this week is client and software engineer Ryan Baxter. Ryan is a competitive obstacle course racer and an excellent example of what can go wrong when you fail to fuel for your activity. The reintroduction of carbs may have been the most important recommendation we made for Ryan. To be fair, Ryan also found overgrowths of opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans and Clostridium difficile and treating those with nutritional supplements will have also contributed to the resolution of his complaints: low libido, poor sleep, foul mood and food cravings.

You should listen to this interview to find out what it’s like to be part of our Elite Performance Program for athletes.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Baxter:

[00:00:43] Ryan is a software engineer working for Pivotal before that he worked for IBM.

[00:02:46] Spartan Obstacle Course Racing.

[00:05:05] Paleo and high-fat diet and then finally ketosis.

[00:07:07] Ben Greenfield and Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast! by Mark Sisson.

[00:07:50] MAF training.

[00:08:32] MyFitnessPal.

[00:09:07] 13+ mile runs in a fasted state.

[00:09:30] Poor sleep.

[00:10:14] Low libido and foul mood.

[00:11:31] Looking for patterns, none to be found.

[00:11:53] Stress and mood.

[00:12:15] Vermont Beast race at Killington ski resort. Duration: 6-10 hours.

[00:15:12] What do people eat in an event like this?

[00:16:49] Experience with a primary care doctor.

[00:17:50] Endurance Planet podcast.

[00:18:13] DUTCH urinary hormones test.

[00:19:01] Family and work life.

[00:21:04] Saving energy for the rest of the day after training.

[00:22:33] Circadian rhythm.

[00:23:56] Cold thermogenesis.

[00:25:57] Eating more carbs.

[00:27:50] Masharani, U., et al. "Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes." European journal of clinical nutrition 69.8 (2015): 944-948.

[00:28:14] Sweet potato, butternut squash, fruit, white rice.

[00:29:48] Backing off on the training.

[00:31:33] Burning fat whilst exercising.

[00:31:53] Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:33:22] Fasting insulin, thyroid, MCV, low T.

[00:33:57] Gut testing.

[00:34:38] Candida and C. diff.

[00:36:18] Yeast metabolism and ethanol.

[00:37:10] Establishing a baseline.

[00:38:56] Retesting.

[00:40:03] Rebound yeast overgrowth.

[00:40:45] ŌURA Ring.

[00:41:38] Improvements in deep sleep.

[00:42:26] Doc Parsley’s Sleep Remedy.

[00:43:46] Coping better with stress.

[00:44:55] Headspace.

[00:46:23] Book a free consultation.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ryan.Baxter.on.2017-01-10.at.10.34.mp3 Fri, 27 Jan 2017 08:01:36 GMT Christopher Kelly The ketogenic diet has many promising applications including better management of type 1 diabetes and as an adjunct cancer therapy. Thirty-five thousand people signed up for the Keto Summit where we talked about other applications including neurological diseases, fat loss and improved athletic performance. If you adopted a high-fat paleo-type diet, you could be forgiven for thinking that if that was good, then ketosis should be better. I know I did. Unfortunately, that isn’t necessarily the case, and recently in our practice, we’ve seen several athletes eating a diet that failed to fuel their activity. Obstacle course racing appears to be one type of event where carbohydrates are mandatory.

My guest this week is client and software engineer Ryan Baxter. Ryan is a competitive obstacle course racer and an excellent example of what can go wrong when you fail to fuel for your activity. The reintroduction of carbs may have been the most important recommendation we made for Ryan. To be fair, Ryan also found overgrowths of opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans and Clostridium difficile and treating those with nutritional supplements will have also contributed to the resolution of his complaints: low libido, poor sleep, foul mood and food cravings.

You should listen to this interview to find out what it’s like to be part of our Elite Performance Program for athletes.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Baxter:

[00:00:43] Ryan is a software engineer working for Pivotal before that he worked for IBM.

[00:02:46] Spartan Obstacle Course Racing.

[00:05:05] Paleo and high-fat diet and then finally ketosis.

[00:07:07] Ben Greenfield and Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast! by Mark Sisson.

[00:07:50] MAF training.

[00:08:32] MyFitnessPal.

[00:09:07] 13+ mile runs in a fasted state.

[00:09:30] Poor sleep.

[00:10:14] Low libido and foul mood.

[00:11:31] Looking for patterns, none to be found.

[00:11:53] Stress and mood.

[00:12:15] Vermont Beast race at Killington ski resort. Duration: 6-10 hours.

[00:15:12] What do people eat in an event like this?

[00:16:49] Experience with a primary care doctor.

[00:17:50] Endurance Planet podcast.

[00:18:13] DUTCH urinary hormones test.

[00:19:01] Family and work life.

[00:21:04] Saving energy for the rest of the day after training.

[00:22:33] Circadian rhythm.

[00:23:56] Cold thermogenesis.

[00:25:57] Eating more carbs.

[00:27:50] Masharani, U., et al. "Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes." European journal of clinical nutrition 69.8 (2015): 944-948.

[00:28:14] Sweet potato, butternut squash, fruit, white rice.

[00:29:48] Backing off on the training.

[00:31:33] Burning fat whilst exercising.

[00:31:53] Podcast: Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:33:22] Fasting insulin, thyroid, MCV, low T.

[00:33:57] Gut testing.

[00:34:38] Candida and C. diff.

[00:36:18] Yeast metabolism and ethanol.

[00:37:10] Establishing a baseline.

[00:38:56] Retesting.

[00:40:03] Rebound yeast overgrowth.

[00:40:45] ŌURA Ring.

[00:41:38] Improvements in deep sleep.

[00:42:26] Doc Parsley’s Sleep Remedy.

[00:43:46] Coping better with stress.

[00:44:55] Headspace.

[00:46:23] Book a free consultation.

]]>
clean
Why We Get Fat and What You Should Really Do About It https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Christopher.Masterjohn.on.2017-01-02.at.09.15.mp3 My guests this week are two of the brightest minds in the health and fitness industry. The first is my own Chief Medical Officer, Tommy Wood, MD PhD. Tommy is currently working as a visiting scientist researching neonatal brain injury at the University of Washington. He received his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, before studying medicine at the University of Oxford.

My second guest is Chris Masterjohn, PhD. Chris earned his PhD in Nutritional Science from the University of Connecticut at Storrs, where he studied the role of glutathione and dietary antioxidants in regulating the accumulation of methylglyoxal. He has authored or co-authored ten peer-reviewed publications. His writes a blog, The Daily Lipid, and produces a podcast by the same name. You can also follow his professional work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat (whatever that is!).

Tommy’s premise for this interview was as follows:

If you fix lifestyle and environment, can you be a lot less "strict" with your diet? For instance, are low carbers needing to be so low carb because everything else is broken?

I took that idea and invited Chris Masterjohn on to the show for a roundtable discussion that starts with a general debate on the causes of obesity and then moves on to what we can all to improve or maintain our body composition.

You should listen to this interview because unlike many others I’ve heard; it includes a broad discussion of the range of issues that we see in our practice that hold people back from their body composition goals. The first time you meet someone who plateaued in their weight loss while eating a low-carb diet you realise that it’s a bit more complicated than that.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tommy Wood and Chris Masterjohn:

[00:03:15] "The built environment," one that facilitates eating more and moving less.

[00:07:48] You, the listeners, are already winning!

[00:08:38] The composition of our food.

[00:09:32] Upsetting set points--poor sleep.

[00:09:57] Circadian rhythm.

[00:10:07] Stress and gut health.

[00:11:36] Low-carb diets and weight loss.

[00:11:52] Cronise, Raymond J., David A. Sinclair, and Andrew A. Bremer. "Oxidative Priority, Meal Frequency, and the Energy Economy of Food and Activity: Implications for Longevity, Obesity, and Cardiometabolic Disease." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2016). Be sure to read Tommy’s response: Wood, Thomas. "If the Metabolic Winter Is Coming, When Will It Be Summer?." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2017).

[00:12:58] Most of your stored body fat came from the fat that you ate.

[00:13:28] Calorie restriction.

[00:14:14] Insulin increases carbohydrate oxidation.

[00:19:10] Body recomposition programs.

[00:19:49] Chris Masterjohn does not see insulin as a key player.

[00:20:37] Whenever you restrict food choices, food intake goes down.

[00:22:56] MyFitnessPal.

[00:23:08] Sleep and calorie intake.

[00:24:28] Low-carb doesn't work well for the type of exercise Chris Masterjohn does.

[00:26:37] Preparing for fat-loss.

[00:29:53] Starting with other ideas that don't work can be helpful.

[00:32:47] Fueling for your activity.

[00:33:56] Start by fixing your environment.

[00:34:26] Feasting and fasting.

[00:35:14] Whole foods.

[00:38:32] Reduced activity in obesity is a symptom, not a cause.

[00:40:33] We're designed to eat when there's an abundance of food, i.e. the summer

[00:41:22] Dr. Satchin Panda on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health.

[00:42:58] Light differential--go outside!

[00:46:05] Blue light at night.

[00:47:01] Ben Greenfield talks about the Human Charger.

[00:47:35] Desktop lights, e.g. Light Book Edge.

[00:50:01] Lindqvist, P. G., et al. "Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort." Journal of internal medicine 280.4 (2016): 375-387.

[00:55:17] Checklists before testing.

[00:58:22] Picture of metabolism and motivation for change.

[00:59:20] Daily Lipid podcast.

[00:59:45] The Ultimate Vitamin K2 Resource.

[01:02:18] Chris is now offering consultation packages.

[01:02:41] Recruiting for a human study.

[01:05:18] Gary Vaynerchuk.

[01:07:42] Developing new tests, especially for vitamin K2.

[01:09:21] VitaK.

[01:11:17] Tommy's plans for the future.

[01:12:26] Dr Pedro Domingos: How to Teach Machines That Can Learn.

[01:12:42] Book a free consultation with NBT.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.Christopher.Masterjohn.on.2017-01-02.at.09.15.mp3 Fri, 20 Jan 2017 08:01:10 GMT Christopher Kelly My guests this week are two of the brightest minds in the health and fitness industry. The first is my own Chief Medical Officer, Tommy Wood, MD PhD. Tommy is currently working as a visiting scientist researching neonatal brain injury at the University of Washington. He received his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from the University of Cambridge, before studying medicine at the University of Oxford.

My second guest is Chris Masterjohn, PhD. Chris earned his PhD in Nutritional Science from the University of Connecticut at Storrs, where he studied the role of glutathione and dietary antioxidants in regulating the accumulation of methylglyoxal. He has authored or co-authored ten peer-reviewed publications. His writes a blog, The Daily Lipid, and produces a podcast by the same name. You can also follow his professional work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat (whatever that is!).

Tommy’s premise for this interview was as follows:

If you fix lifestyle and environment, can you be a lot less "strict" with your diet? For instance, are low carbers needing to be so low carb because everything else is broken?

I took that idea and invited Chris Masterjohn on to the show for a roundtable discussion that starts with a general debate on the causes of obesity and then moves on to what we can all to improve or maintain our body composition.

You should listen to this interview because unlike many others I’ve heard; it includes a broad discussion of the range of issues that we see in our practice that hold people back from their body composition goals. The first time you meet someone who plateaued in their weight loss while eating a low-carb diet you realise that it’s a bit more complicated than that.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Tommy Wood and Chris Masterjohn:

[00:03:15] "The built environment," one that facilitates eating more and moving less.

[00:07:48] You, the listeners, are already winning!

[00:08:38] The composition of our food.

[00:09:32] Upsetting set points--poor sleep.

[00:09:57] Circadian rhythm.

[00:10:07] Stress and gut health.

[00:11:36] Low-carb diets and weight loss.

[00:11:52] Cronise, Raymond J., David A. Sinclair, and Andrew A. Bremer. "Oxidative Priority, Meal Frequency, and the Energy Economy of Food and Activity: Implications for Longevity, Obesity, and Cardiometabolic Disease." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2016). Be sure to read Tommy’s response: Wood, Thomas. "If the Metabolic Winter Is Coming, When Will It Be Summer?." Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2017).

[00:12:58] Most of your stored body fat came from the fat that you ate.

[00:13:28] Calorie restriction.

[00:14:14] Insulin increases carbohydrate oxidation.

[00:19:10] Body recomposition programs.

[00:19:49] Chris Masterjohn does not see insulin as a key player.

[00:20:37] Whenever you restrict food choices, food intake goes down.

[00:22:56] MyFitnessPal.

[00:23:08] Sleep and calorie intake.

[00:24:28] Low-carb doesn't work well for the type of exercise Chris Masterjohn does.

[00:26:37] Preparing for fat-loss.

[00:29:53] Starting with other ideas that don't work can be helpful.

[00:32:47] Fueling for your activity.

[00:33:56] Start by fixing your environment.

[00:34:26] Feasting and fasting.

[00:35:14] Whole foods.

[00:38:32] Reduced activity in obesity is a symptom, not a cause.

[00:40:33] We're designed to eat when there's an abundance of food, i.e. the summer

[00:41:22] Dr. Satchin Panda on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health.

[00:42:58] Light differential--go outside!

[00:46:05] Blue light at night.

[00:47:01] Ben Greenfield talks about the Human Charger.

[00:47:35] Desktop lights, e.g. Light Book Edge.

[00:50:01] Lindqvist, P. G., et al. "Avoidance of sun exposure as a risk factor for major causes of death: a competing risk analysis of the Melanoma in Southern Sweden cohort." Journal of internal medicine 280.4 (2016): 375-387.

[00:55:17] Checklists before testing.

[00:58:22] Picture of metabolism and motivation for change.

[00:59:20] Daily Lipid podcast.

[00:59:45] The Ultimate Vitamin K2 Resource.

[01:02:18] Chris is now offering consultation packages.

[01:02:41] Recruiting for a human study.

[01:05:18] Gary Vaynerchuk.

[01:07:42] Developing new tests, especially for vitamin K2.

[01:09:21] VitaK.

[01:11:17] Tommy's plans for the future.

[01:12:26] Dr Pedro Domingos: How to Teach Machines That Can Learn.

[01:12:42] Book a free consultation with NBT.

]]>
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How to Think Yourself Younger, Healthier, and Faster https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/ellen.langer.on.2016-12-27.at.07.06.mp3 Several years ago, I learned about mindfulness the hard way. I was eating a cardiologist recommended diet that apparently wasn’t working for me and I failed to pay attention to any of the warning signs. The first person to draw attention to my mindlessness was the woman who is now my wife and co-founder at NBT. Only recently did I discover the decades of careful research on the simple practice of noticing, and how that can be both good for you and fun.

My guest this week is Dr Ellen Langer, PhD, a social psychologist and the first female professor to gain tenure in the Psychology Department at Harvard University. She is the author of eleven books and more than two hundred research articles written for general and academic readers on mindfulness for over 35 years. Her best-selling books include Mindfulness; The Power of Mindful Learning; On Becoming an Artist: Reinventing Yourself Through Mindful Creativity; and Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

See Langer EJ[Author] on PubMed.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ellen Langer, PhD:

[00:01:22] Align Therapy podcast.

[00:02:24] Science is in based probabilities.

[00:04:29] Book: Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

[00:05:02] The mind-body problem.

[00:06:13] Counterclockwise study.

[00:06:46] Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. "Mind-set matters exercise and the placebo effect." Psychological Science 18.2 (2007): 165-171.

[00:08:20] Langer, Ellen, et al. "Believing is seeing using mindlessness (mindfully) to improve visual acuity." Psychological Science (2010).

[00:10:21] Airforce pilot study.

[00:11:45] Adopting a "crutch".

[00:12:43] Mindlessness.

[00:13:16] Actively noticing new things.

[00:13:54] Doing things people hated.

[00:14:26] Meditation is a tool to lead to post-meditation.

[00:15:19] Becoming aware that you don't know anything.

[00:16:06] 1 + 1 = ?

[00:19:01] Seeing the world in black and white.

[00:20:08] Passing yourself over to a doctor.

[00:20:23] You are the keeper of the special information.

[00:20:51] Regression to the mean.

[00:22:07] Pay attention to the subtleties.

[00:22:58] Harnessing the power of the placebo.

[00:23:34] Park, Chanmo, et al. "Blood sugar level follows perceived time rather than actual time in people with type 2 diabetes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016): 201603444.

[00:25:36] Sports psychology.

[00:27:18] The true expert is always a learner.

[00:29:01] Golf.

[00:29:32] Quantified Body podcast: Is Your Glucose Metabolism Unique to You?

[00:32:26] Mindfulness is fun!

[00:34:23] Book: The Art of Noticing.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/ellen.langer.on.2016-12-27.at.07.06.mp3 Thu, 12 Jan 2017 17:01:38 GMT Christopher Kelly Several years ago, I learned about mindfulness the hard way. I was eating a cardiologist recommended diet that apparently wasn’t working for me and I failed to pay attention to any of the warning signs. The first person to draw attention to my mindlessness was the woman who is now my wife and co-founder at NBT. Only recently did I discover the decades of careful research on the simple practice of noticing, and how that can be both good for you and fun.

My guest this week is Dr Ellen Langer, PhD, a social psychologist and the first female professor to gain tenure in the Psychology Department at Harvard University. She is the author of eleven books and more than two hundred research articles written for general and academic readers on mindfulness for over 35 years. Her best-selling books include Mindfulness; The Power of Mindful Learning; On Becoming an Artist: Reinventing Yourself Through Mindful Creativity; and Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

See Langer EJ[Author] on PubMed.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ellen Langer, PhD:

[00:01:22] Align Therapy podcast.

[00:02:24] Science is in based probabilities.

[00:04:29] Book: Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

[00:05:02] The mind-body problem.

[00:06:13] Counterclockwise study.

[00:06:46] Crum, Alia J., and Ellen J. Langer. "Mind-set matters exercise and the placebo effect." Psychological Science 18.2 (2007): 165-171.

[00:08:20] Langer, Ellen, et al. "Believing is seeing using mindlessness (mindfully) to improve visual acuity." Psychological Science (2010).

[00:10:21] Airforce pilot study.

[00:11:45] Adopting a "crutch".

[00:12:43] Mindlessness.

[00:13:16] Actively noticing new things.

[00:13:54] Doing things people hated.

[00:14:26] Meditation is a tool to lead to post-meditation.

[00:15:19] Becoming aware that you don't know anything.

[00:16:06] 1 + 1 = ?

[00:19:01] Seeing the world in black and white.

[00:20:08] Passing yourself over to a doctor.

[00:20:23] You are the keeper of the special information.

[00:20:51] Regression to the mean.

[00:22:07] Pay attention to the subtleties.

[00:22:58] Harnessing the power of the placebo.

[00:23:34] Park, Chanmo, et al. "Blood sugar level follows perceived time rather than actual time in people with type 2 diabetes." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016): 201603444.

[00:25:36] Sports psychology.

[00:27:18] The true expert is always a learner.

[00:29:01] Golf.

[00:29:32] Quantified Body podcast: Is Your Glucose Metabolism Unique to You?

[00:32:26] Mindfulness is fun!

[00:34:23] Book: The Art of Noticing.

]]>
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How to Test and Predict Blood, Urine and Stool for Health, Longevity and Performance https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Gerstmar.on.2016-12-21.at.10.09.mp3 Dr Tim Gerstmar practices Naturopathic Medicine at his Redmond, WA office, Aspire Natural Health. He specialises in working with people with digestive and autoimmune problems, and has worked with many of the most difficult to treat situations using a blend of natural and conventional medicine. He treats patients locally, throughout the US and as far away as the Qatar, Korea and Australia.

In this interview, Dr Gerstmar discusses the tests he most commonly uses, especially for gastrointestinal complaints. We also talk about strategies for dealing with health insurance and tips for keeping costs down.

These scatter plots, sometimes called calibration plots, are the ones I mentioned in the podcast. On the x-axis is what my XGBoost model predicted for previously unseen data, the y-axis represents the measured value. When the dot appears on the diagonal line, the prediction was perfect. The model was trained using results from just 260 athletes. My hope is that is these models will eventually bring down the cost of our full program by allowing us to predict the results of an expensive test using a cheaper one.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tim Gerstmar:

[00:00:15] First podcast: Methylation and Environmental Pollutants with Dr. Tim Gerstmar.

[00:00:56] Bob McRae podcast: How to Use Biomedical Testing for IRONMAN Performance.

[00:01:24] Our Elite Performance Programme.

[00:04:04] How much testing should we do?

[00:04:35] Factoring in lifetime costs.

[00:08:33] Donating blood to the Red Cross.

[00:09:44] Iron disorders: ferritin and haemochromatosis.

[00:10:53] Therapeutic phlebotomy.

[00:14:22] Treating symptoms is sometimes necessary.

[00:15:07] Steroids for eczema.

[00:17:09] Adrenal dysregulation and thyroid dysfunction.

[00:18:00] You can't feel high blood sugar in diabetes.

[00:18:46] AIMed conference.

[00:19:06] De Fauw, Jeffrey, et al. "Automated analysis of retinal imaging using machine learning techniques for computer vision." F1000Research 5 (2016).

[00:20:38] 25-OH-D testing. See Optimizing Vitamin D for Athletic Performance.

[00:22:01] Insurance interfering with testing.

[00:23:29] Liberty HealthShare.

[00:23:42] Affordable Care Act.

[00:24:10] Direct Primary Care.

[00:24:23] Health Share of Oregon.

[00:25:08] Covered California.

[00:25:32] Health Savings Account.

[00:28:52] Genova GI Effects stool test.

[00:29:27] BioHealth stool test.

[00:29:49] Doctor's Data stool test.

[00:30:13] Coeliac diagnosis.

[00:30:50] Transglutaminase.

[00:31:44] Genetic risk factors.

[00:32:43] NCGS and FODMAPs.

[00:34:22] Intestinal lymphoma.

[00:37:47] Normal test results are still useful information.

[00:38:45] Liver enzymes, e.g. ALT, AST and GGT.

[00:39:19] CBC and CMP, Hs-CRP.

[00:39:47] Testosterone and thyroid.

[00:40:09] Genova SIBO test.

[00:41:08] Organic acids by Genova and Great Plains.

[00:41:55] Beware insurance with OATs.

[00:43:23] Verifying your policy.

[00:44:07] Mitochondrial function.

[00:44:21] Nutrient deficiencies.

[00:44:52] Neurotransmitters and brain function.

[00:45:04] Oxidative stress.

[00:45:12] Detox stress, GSH status.

[00:45:38] Bacterial and yeast markers.

[00:46:49] Cortisol testing--DUTCH.

[00:48:45] Interview with Pedro Domingos: How to Teach Machines That Can Learn.

[00:49:08] XGBoost.

[00:50:33] Robb Wolf early adoption costs.

[00:51:54] HRV. See Elite HRV podcast.

[00:52:08] Supplement companies and self-assessment questionnaires.

[00:53:10] Arabinose.

[00:53:48] Hallucinating from noise in the data.

[00:54:52] Big Data.

[00:56:03] Abnormality detection.

[00:56:45] Functional versus pathological lab ranges.

[00:57:46] Mark Newman. See cortisol testing above.

[00:58:23] Adjusted reference ranges.

[00:58:45] Vanity sizing.

[01:00:52] Thyroid cancer and proximity to a mine.

[01:01:21] Aspire Natural Health podcast.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Gerstmar.on.2016-12-21.at.10.09.mp3 Fri, 06 Jan 2017 12:01:34 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr Tim Gerstmar practices Naturopathic Medicine at his Redmond, WA office, Aspire Natural Health. He specialises in working with people with digestive and autoimmune problems, and has worked with many of the most difficult to treat situations using a blend of natural and conventional medicine. He treats patients locally, throughout the US and as far away as the Qatar, Korea and Australia.

In this interview, Dr Gerstmar discusses the tests he most commonly uses, especially for gastrointestinal complaints. We also talk about strategies for dealing with health insurance and tips for keeping costs down.

These scatter plots, sometimes called calibration plots, are the ones I mentioned in the podcast. On the x-axis is what my XGBoost model predicted for previously unseen data, the y-axis represents the measured value. When the dot appears on the diagonal line, the prediction was perfect. The model was trained using results from just 260 athletes. My hope is that is these models will eventually bring down the cost of our full program by allowing us to predict the results of an expensive test using a cheaper one.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr Tim Gerstmar:

[00:00:15] First podcast: Methylation and Environmental Pollutants with Dr. Tim Gerstmar.

[00:00:56] Bob McRae podcast: How to Use Biomedical Testing for IRONMAN Performance.

[00:01:24] Our Elite Performance Programme.

[00:04:04] How much testing should we do?

[00:04:35] Factoring in lifetime costs.

[00:08:33] Donating blood to the Red Cross.

[00:09:44] Iron disorders: ferritin and haemochromatosis.

[00:10:53] Therapeutic phlebotomy.

[00:14:22] Treating symptoms is sometimes necessary.

[00:15:07] Steroids for eczema.

[00:17:09] Adrenal dysregulation and thyroid dysfunction.

[00:18:00] You can't feel high blood sugar in diabetes.

[00:18:46] AIMed conference.

[00:19:06] De Fauw, Jeffrey, et al. "Automated analysis of retinal imaging using machine learning techniques for computer vision." F1000Research 5 (2016).

[00:20:38] 25-OH-D testing. See Optimizing Vitamin D for Athletic Performance.

[00:22:01] Insurance interfering with testing.

[00:23:29] Liberty HealthShare.

[00:23:42] Affordable Care Act.

[00:24:10] Direct Primary Care.

[00:24:23] Health Share of Oregon.

[00:25:08] Covered California.

[00:25:32] Health Savings Account.

[00:28:52] Genova GI Effects stool test.

[00:29:27] BioHealth stool test.

[00:29:49] Doctor's Data stool test.

[00:30:13] Coeliac diagnosis.

[00:30:50] Transglutaminase.

[00:31:44] Genetic risk factors.

[00:32:43] NCGS and FODMAPs.

[00:34:22] Intestinal lymphoma.

[00:37:47] Normal test results are still useful information.

[00:38:45] Liver enzymes, e.g. ALT, AST and GGT.

[00:39:19] CBC and CMP, Hs-CRP.

[00:39:47] Testosterone and thyroid.

[00:40:09] Genova SIBO test.

[00:41:08] Organic acids by Genova and Great Plains.

[00:41:55] Beware insurance with OATs.

[00:43:23] Verifying your policy.

[00:44:07] Mitochondrial function.

[00:44:21] Nutrient deficiencies.

[00:44:52] Neurotransmitters and brain function.

[00:45:04] Oxidative stress.

[00:45:12] Detox stress, GSH status.

[00:45:38] Bacterial and yeast markers.

[00:46:49] Cortisol testing--DUTCH.

[00:48:45] Interview with Pedro Domingos: How to Teach Machines That Can Learn.

[00:49:08] XGBoost.

[00:50:33] Robb Wolf early adoption costs.

[00:51:54] HRV. See Elite HRV podcast.

[00:52:08] Supplement companies and self-assessment questionnaires.

[00:53:10] Arabinose.

[00:53:48] Hallucinating from noise in the data.

[00:54:52] Big Data.

[00:56:03] Abnormality detection.

[00:56:45] Functional versus pathological lab ranges.

[00:57:46] Mark Newman. See cortisol testing above.

[00:58:23] Adjusted reference ranges.

[00:58:45] Vanity sizing.

[01:00:52] Thyroid cancer and proximity to a mine.

[01:01:21] Aspire Natural Health podcast.

]]>
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High Ketones and Carbs at the Same Time? Great Performance Tip or Horrible Idea… https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.T.Nelson.on.2016-12-06.at.07.08_edited.mp3 Coach and exercise physiologist Dr Mike T. Nelson pulled me to one side recently after seeing the results of my little experiment with a ketone ester supplement. In this interview, you’ll learn about why Dr. Mike thinks we should exercise caution before regularly simultaneously raising blood glucose and ketones.

We also talk about why metabolic flexibility, not ketosis, should be the goal for most endurance athletes.

Problems with impaired fat use:

From  Nelson, Michael T., George R. Biltz, and Donald R. Dengel. "Repeatability of Respiratory Exchange Ratio Time Series Analysis." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.9 (2015): 2550-2558.

"Goedecke et al. (12) showed a very large interindividual variability in resting RER from 0.72 up to 0.93 that even persisted during exercise of increasing intensity. This corresponded to a relative rate of fat oxidation that ranged from 23 to 93%. This large interindividual variability in RER from 0.83 to 0.95 was also demonstrated by Helge et al. (16) during low-intensity steady-state exercise. This was quite similar to what we observed with a range of RER from 0.82 to 0.97.” (Nelson, MT, et al. 2015).

Goedecke, Julia H., et al. "Determinants of the variability in respiratory exchange ratio at rest and during exercise in trained athletes." American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology And Metabolism 279.6 (2000): E1325-E1334.

Helge, Jørn W., et al. "Interrelationships between muscle fibre type, substrate oxidation and body fat." International journal of obesity 23.9 (1999): 986-991

Problems with impaired carb use:

Research has shown that those are on a very low carb diet for prolonged periods of time demonstrate a reduced ability to fully use them during exercise (Burke, LM, et al.; Stellingwerf T. et al).

Burke, Louise M., et al. "Effect of fat adaptation and carbohydrate restoration on metabolism and performance during prolonged cycling." Journal of Applied Physiology 89.6 (2000): 2413-2421.

Stellingwerff, Trent, et al. "Decreased PDH activation and glycogenolysis during exercise following fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration." American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism 290.2 (2006): E380-E388.

Finally, we discuss the potential interference effect of endurance exercise on strength training. Context matters! Only elite athletes probably need to worry about this, and at least one study has shown untrained women can use either order and get similar responses.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Mike T. Nelson, PhD:

[00:01:02] Keto Summit interview on Metabolic Flexibility.

[00:03:25] Complete Blueprint To Faster Results...Without Pain and Plateaus.

[00:06:14] Get the "Deadlift Re-alignment for Broken Meatheads." for free.

[00:07:28] Online coaching.

[00:08:58] http://www.miketnelson.com/podcast

[00:09:15] HRV for Successful Online Coaching with Dr. Mike T. Nelson.

[00:09:38] ithlete.

[00:12:29] Zoom video conference software.

[00:13:08] Instant Ketosis: 0.4 to 6.2mM in 30 Minutes.

[00:13:47] Dominic D'Agostino: Researcher and Athlete on the Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet.

[00:15:34] Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:16:57] Ketone esters for endurance performance.

[00:20:05] Ride time to exhaustion.

[00:21:04] Professor Kieran Clarke at Oxford University.

[00:22:27] Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:25:19] Brooks, George A., and Jacques Mercier. "Balance of carbohydrate and lipid utilization during exercise: the" crossover" concept." Journal of applied physiology 76.6 (1994): 2253-2261.

[00:26:10] Ketone salts and C8 (caprylic) oil to "push the process".

[00:28:05] Fasting and carbohydrate adaptation.

[00:28:18] Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH).

[00:29:39] Ketone supplements and appetite suppression.

[00:33:36] Jeff Rothschild.

[00:34:20] FATMAX and the hard transition.

[00:35:18] Peterson, Benjamin James. Repeated Sprint Ability: The Influence of Aerobic Capacity on Energy Pathway Response and Fatigue of Hockey Players. Diss. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, 2014.

[00:37:42] Reintroducing carbs.

[00:41:43] Sprints on wet tarmac (not recommended).

[00:43:07] Terzis, Gerasimos, et al. "Early phase interference between low-intensity running and power training in moderately trained females." European journal of applied physiology 116.5 (2016): 1063-1073. Coffey, Vernon G., and John A. Hawley. "Concurrent exercise training: do opposites distract?." The Journal of physiology (2016). Also, 5-10x 2 minute intervals at 120-150% of LT (HIIT) and 15-30 minute continuous cycling at 80-100% of LT equally interfere with the adaptations to resistance training. So it’s not the intensity, more the total volume, that’s the problem.

[00:46:22] Prioritising strength in the offseason.

[00:48:40] Kiteboarding.

[00:49:55] Fortaleza.

[00:51:06] Mike's email.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mike.T.Nelson.on.2016-12-06.at.07.08_edited.mp3 Fri, 30 Dec 2016 10:12:18 GMT Christopher Kelly Coach and exercise physiologist Dr Mike T. Nelson pulled me to one side recently after seeing the results of my little experiment with a ketone ester supplement. In this interview, you’ll learn about why Dr. Mike thinks we should exercise caution before regularly simultaneously raising blood glucose and ketones.

We also talk about why metabolic flexibility, not ketosis, should be the goal for most endurance athletes.

Problems with impaired fat use:

From  Nelson, Michael T., George R. Biltz, and Donald R. Dengel. "Repeatability of Respiratory Exchange Ratio Time Series Analysis." The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research 29.9 (2015): 2550-2558.

"Goedecke et al. (12) showed a very large interindividual variability in resting RER from 0.72 up to 0.93 that even persisted during exercise of increasing intensity. This corresponded to a relative rate of fat oxidation that ranged from 23 to 93%. This large interindividual variability in RER from 0.83 to 0.95 was also demonstrated by Helge et al. (16) during low-intensity steady-state exercise. This was quite similar to what we observed with a range of RER from 0.82 to 0.97.” (Nelson, MT, et al. 2015).

Goedecke, Julia H., et al. "Determinants of the variability in respiratory exchange ratio at rest and during exercise in trained athletes." American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology And Metabolism 279.6 (2000): E1325-E1334.

Helge, Jørn W., et al. "Interrelationships between muscle fibre type, substrate oxidation and body fat." International journal of obesity 23.9 (1999): 986-991

Problems with impaired carb use:

Research has shown that those are on a very low carb diet for prolonged periods of time demonstrate a reduced ability to fully use them during exercise (Burke, LM, et al.; Stellingwerf T. et al).

Burke, Louise M., et al. "Effect of fat adaptation and carbohydrate restoration on metabolism and performance during prolonged cycling." Journal of Applied Physiology 89.6 (2000): 2413-2421.

Stellingwerff, Trent, et al. "Decreased PDH activation and glycogenolysis during exercise following fat adaptation with carbohydrate restoration." American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism 290.2 (2006): E380-E388.

Finally, we discuss the potential interference effect of endurance exercise on strength training. Context matters! Only elite athletes probably need to worry about this, and at least one study has shown untrained women can use either order and get similar responses.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Mike T. Nelson, PhD:

[00:01:02] Keto Summit interview on Metabolic Flexibility.

[00:03:25] Complete Blueprint To Faster Results...Without Pain and Plateaus.

[00:06:14] Get the "Deadlift Re-alignment for Broken Meatheads." for free.

[00:07:28] Online coaching.

[00:08:58] http://www.miketnelson.com/podcast

[00:09:15] HRV for Successful Online Coaching with Dr. Mike T. Nelson.

[00:09:38] ithlete.

[00:12:29] Zoom video conference software.

[00:13:08] Instant Ketosis: 0.4 to 6.2mM in 30 Minutes.

[00:13:47] Dominic D'Agostino: Researcher and Athlete on the Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet.

[00:15:34] Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:16:57] Ketone esters for endurance performance.

[00:20:05] Ride time to exhaustion.

[00:21:04] Professor Kieran Clarke at Oxford University.

[00:22:27] Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More!

[00:25:19] Brooks, George A., and Jacques Mercier. "Balance of carbohydrate and lipid utilization during exercise: the" crossover" concept." Journal of applied physiology 76.6 (1994): 2253-2261.

[00:26:10] Ketone salts and C8 (caprylic) oil to "push the process".

[00:28:05] Fasting and carbohydrate adaptation.

[00:28:18] Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH).

[00:29:39] Ketone supplements and appetite suppression.

[00:33:36] Jeff Rothschild.

[00:34:20] FATMAX and the hard transition.

[00:35:18] Peterson, Benjamin James. Repeated Sprint Ability: The Influence of Aerobic Capacity on Energy Pathway Response and Fatigue of Hockey Players. Diss. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, 2014.

[00:37:42] Reintroducing carbs.

[00:41:43] Sprints on wet tarmac (not recommended).

[00:43:07] Terzis, Gerasimos, et al. "Early phase interference between low-intensity running and power training in moderately trained females." European journal of applied physiology 116.5 (2016): 1063-1073. Coffey, Vernon G., and John A. Hawley. "Concurrent exercise training: do opposites distract?." The Journal of physiology (2016). Also, 5-10x 2 minute intervals at 120-150% of LT (HIIT) and 15-30 minute continuous cycling at 80-100% of LT equally interfere with the adaptations to resistance training. So it’s not the intensity, more the total volume, that’s the problem.

[00:46:22] Prioritising strength in the offseason.

[00:48:40] Kiteboarding.

[00:49:55] Fortaleza.

[00:51:06] Mike's email.

]]>
clean
Why You Should Skip Oxaloacetate Supplementation, Fueling for Your Activity and More! https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-12-4.at.13.mp3 Tommy and I recorded this interview in person at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging where we were attending Dr. Dale Bredesen’s training for reversing cognitive decline. If you’ve yet to discover Dr. Bredesen’s amazing work, I’d highly recommend his STEM-Talk interview. My attempt to capture the impressiveness of the Buck Institute leaves a lot to be desired, but since I promised a photo during the recording, here it is:

We love our supplements at Nourish Balance Thrive, and we regularly recommend them to the people we work with, usually when indicated by a test result. What we’re less keen on is expensive nonsense with no human data or even plausible mechanism of action. Oxaloacetate falls into this category, and in this interview, you'll learn enough biochemistry to understand why you should save your money. As always, we reserve the right to be proven wrong!

In the second part of this interview, you'll learn about why it's essential to eat to fuel for your activity. We're huge fans of a ketogenic diet for a handful of very specific applications, but not as a general recommendation, especially for athletes engaging in highly glycolytic activities like Crossfit and obstacle course racing.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood, MD PhDc:

[00:00:26] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:00:43] Bredesen, Dale E., et al. "Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease." Aging (Albany NY) 8.6 (2016): 1250.

[00:00:59] Journal of Neuroscience.

[00:02:00] Hippocampal volume increasing.

[00:02:26] Blood chem, genotyping, biotoxins, heavy metals.

[00:02:32] ReCode software.

[00:03:17] Send me your questions for Dr. Bredesen.

[00:03:41] Oxaloacetate supplementation.

[00:04:01] How to Achieve Near-Normal Blood Sugar with Type 1 Diabetes with Dr. Keith Runyan, MD.

[00:05:18] Caloric restriction in humans.

[00:05:23] CALERIE trial.

[00:06:08] Calorie restriction falters in the long run.

[00:07:01] The benefit comes on the refeed.

[00:07:14] Valter Longo, Ph.D. on Fasting-Mimicking Diet & Fasting for Longevity, Cancer & Multiple Sclerosis.

[00:07:41] Getting Stronger with Todd Becker.

[00:08:18] C. elegans.

[00:08:47] Malate-aspartate shuttle.

[00:09:20] NAD+/NADH ratio.

[00:09:32] AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1).

[00:09:45] FOXO3.

[00:10:01] Nicotinamide riboside (NR).

[00:10:19] Strong, Randy, et al. "Evaluation of resveratrol, green tea extract, curcumin, oxaloacetic acid, and medium-chain triglyceride oil on life span of genetically heterogeneous mice." The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 68.1 (2013): 6-16.

[00:11:14] Toxic effects of glutamate.

[00:11:48] Excitotoxicity.

[00:12:30] Aspartate transaminase (AST) on a blood chem.

[00:13:37] The OAA supplements include a meaningless dose anyway.

[00:14:17] Anaplerotic reactions.

[00:15:27] Pyruvate dehydrogenase and biotin (B7) deficiency.

[00:16:54] Context for a ketogenic diet.

[00:18:06] Glycolytic activity.

[00:19:20] Fasting blood glucose.

[00:19:36] Alkaline phosphatase (Alk Phos).

[00:20:01] Zinc deficiency.

[00:21:26] Thyroid.

[00:22:02] Deiodinase enzymes.

[00:24:11] Lipids.

[00:24:39] LDL receptor.

[00:25:29] Red blood cell production

[00:25:51] Mean corpuscular volume (MCV).

[00:26:33] Macrocytosis due to folate deficiency.

[00:29:24] Masharani, U., et al. "Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes." European journal of clinical nutrition 69.8 (2015): 944-948.

[00:31:07] Ketosis makes you sharp so you can go get some food.

[00:31:46] A New Hope for Brain Tumors with Dr. Adrienne Scheck.

[00:31:59] Dominic D'Agostino: Researcher and Athlete on the Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet.

[00:32:08] A ketogenic diet shows some promise for Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer’s.

[00:32:33] Light dark cycles.

[00:33:18] Breast feeding and carbs.

[00:33:45] Thompson, Betty J., and Stuart Smith. "Biosynthesis of fatty acids by lactating human breast epithelial cells: an evaluation of the contribution to the overall composition of human milk fat." Pediatr Res 19.1 (1985): 139-143.

[00:34:05] Babies are in ketosis.

[00:34:32] Medium-chain triglyceride.

[00:35:07] Read, W. W. C., PHYLLIS G. LUTZ, and ANAHID TASHJIAN. "Human Milk Lipids II. The influence of dietary carbohydrates and fat on the fatty acids of mature milk. A study in four ethnic groups." The American journal of clinical nutrition 17.3 (1965): 180-183.

[00:35:21] Keto rat experiment.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-12-4.at.13.mp3 Thu, 22 Dec 2016 15:12:58 GMT Christopher Kelly Tommy and I recorded this interview in person at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging where we were attending Dr. Dale Bredesen’s training for reversing cognitive decline. If you’ve yet to discover Dr. Bredesen’s amazing work, I’d highly recommend his STEM-Talk interview. My attempt to capture the impressiveness of the Buck Institute leaves a lot to be desired, but since I promised a photo during the recording, here it is:

We love our supplements at Nourish Balance Thrive, and we regularly recommend them to the people we work with, usually when indicated by a test result. What we’re less keen on is expensive nonsense with no human data or even plausible mechanism of action. Oxaloacetate falls into this category, and in this interview, you'll learn enough biochemistry to understand why you should save your money. As always, we reserve the right to be proven wrong!

In the second part of this interview, you'll learn about why it's essential to eat to fuel for your activity. We're huge fans of a ketogenic diet for a handful of very specific applications, but not as a general recommendation, especially for athletes engaging in highly glycolytic activities like Crossfit and obstacle course racing.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood, MD PhDc:

[00:00:26] Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

[00:00:43] Bredesen, Dale E., et al. "Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease." Aging (Albany NY) 8.6 (2016): 1250.

[00:00:59] Journal of Neuroscience.

[00:02:00] Hippocampal volume increasing.

[00:02:26] Blood chem, genotyping, biotoxins, heavy metals.

[00:02:32] ReCode software.

[00:03:17] Send me your questions for Dr. Bredesen.

[00:03:41] Oxaloacetate supplementation.

[00:04:01] How to Achieve Near-Normal Blood Sugar with Type 1 Diabetes with Dr. Keith Runyan, MD.

[00:05:18] Caloric restriction in humans.

[00:05:23] CALERIE trial.

[00:06:08] Calorie restriction falters in the long run.

[00:07:01] The benefit comes on the refeed.

[00:07:14] Valter Longo, Ph.D. on Fasting-Mimicking Diet & Fasting for Longevity, Cancer & Multiple Sclerosis.

[00:07:41] Getting Stronger with Todd Becker.

[00:08:18] C. elegans.

[00:08:47] Malate-aspartate shuttle.

[00:09:20] NAD+/NADH ratio.

[00:09:32] AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1).

[00:09:45] FOXO3.

[00:10:01] Nicotinamide riboside (NR).

[00:10:19] Strong, Randy, et al. "Evaluation of resveratrol, green tea extract, curcumin, oxaloacetic acid, and medium-chain triglyceride oil on life span of genetically heterogeneous mice." The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 68.1 (2013): 6-16.

[00:11:14] Toxic effects of glutamate.

[00:11:48] Excitotoxicity.

[00:12:30] Aspartate transaminase (AST) on a blood chem.

[00:13:37] The OAA supplements include a meaningless dose anyway.

[00:14:17] Anaplerotic reactions.

[00:15:27] Pyruvate dehydrogenase and biotin (B7) deficiency.

[00:16:54] Context for a ketogenic diet.

[00:18:06] Glycolytic activity.

[00:19:20] Fasting blood glucose.

[00:19:36] Alkaline phosphatase (Alk Phos).

[00:20:01] Zinc deficiency.

[00:21:26] Thyroid.

[00:22:02] Deiodinase enzymes.

[00:24:11] Lipids.

[00:24:39] LDL receptor.

[00:25:29] Red blood cell production

[00:25:51] Mean corpuscular volume (MCV).

[00:26:33] Macrocytosis due to folate deficiency.

[00:29:24] Masharani, U., et al. "Metabolic and physiologic effects from consuming a hunter-gatherer (Paleolithic)-type diet in type 2 diabetes." European journal of clinical nutrition 69.8 (2015): 944-948.

[00:31:07] Ketosis makes you sharp so you can go get some food.

[00:31:46] A New Hope for Brain Tumors with Dr. Adrienne Scheck.

[00:31:59] Dominic D'Agostino: Researcher and Athlete on the Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet.

[00:32:08] A ketogenic diet shows some promise for Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer’s.

[00:32:33] Light dark cycles.

[00:33:18] Breast feeding and carbs.

[00:33:45] Thompson, Betty J., and Stuart Smith. "Biosynthesis of fatty acids by lactating human breast epithelial cells: an evaluation of the contribution to the overall composition of human milk fat." Pediatr Res 19.1 (1985): 139-143.

[00:34:05] Babies are in ketosis.

[00:34:32] Medium-chain triglyceride.

[00:35:07] Read, W. W. C., PHYLLIS G. LUTZ, and ANAHID TASHJIAN. "Human Milk Lipids II. The influence of dietary carbohydrates and fat on the fatty acids of mature milk. A study in four ethnic groups." The American journal of clinical nutrition 17.3 (1965): 180-183.

[00:35:21] Keto rat experiment.

]]>
clean
Getting Stronger https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Todd.Becker.on.2016-11-21.at.07_edited.mp3 Hormetism is the application of progressive, intermittent stress to overcome challenges and grow stronger physically, mentally and emotionally. As athletes, we intuitively understand the hormetic effect of exercise but did you know that cold, altitude, plant toxins and even straining slightly to read can all be used to help us get stronger?

My guest is for this interview is Todd Becker, a freelance blogger based in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he lives with his wife and two children. He has degrees in Chemical Engineering and Philosophy from Stanford University and Brown University.  Todd currently works as a staff scientist for a biotechnology company in Palo Alto, where he leads project teams and holds more than 20 patents.
 
Not everyone will have access to all of the hormetic stressors we talk about in this episode. The important takeaway message is that there's more than one way to get stronger. Take advantage in whatever way you see fit.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Todd Becker:

[00:00:24] Myopia: A Modern Yet Reversible Disease.

[00:00:53] AHS16 - Todd Becker - Living High and Healthy.

[00:01:48] Hormesis.

[00:02:35] Low-carb and intermittent fasting.

[00:03:58] Going on holiday and forgetting glasses.

[00:04:40] Print pushing.

[00:05:02] Exercise.

[00:05:29] Immune system.

[00:06:07] UV.

[00:06:13] Overcompensation.

[00:07:28] Lactose tolerance.

[00:08:35] Unnecessarily avoiding the sun.

[00:10:05] Finding the perfect amount of stress.

[00:12:15] Learning to fast blog post.

[00:13:00] Heart rate variability or even just resting HR.

[00:14:02] Cold showers.

[00:14:43] Alcohol.

[00:15:53] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:16:08] Allostasis.

[00:17:07] Wood smoke.

[00:17:25] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:17:41] Is charred meat bad for you?

[00:18:29] Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human.

[00:19:02] Phases of detoxification.

[00:19:17] CYP3A4.

[00:19:42] Superoxide dismutase.

[00:20:01] Sulforaphane and Its Effects on Cancer, Mortality, Aging, Brain and Behavior, Heart Disease & More.

[00:21:28] Low-dose dioxins.

[00:21:53] Hormone analogues.

[00:22:14] Gluten.

[00:22:40] IgE emergency response.

[00:22:50] An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases.

[00:23:36] Peanut allergies

[00:23:56] Karelia (historical province of Finland).

[00:25:00] Reversing peanut allergies.

[00:25:22] Poison ivy and oak.

[00:26:49] Peanut oil in diaper cream.

[00:27:06] Oral vs topical exposure.

[00:27:23] Epstein–Barr virus infection at certain ages.

[00:28:09] Altitude.

[00:28:24] Boulder has the lowest obesity rate in the US.

[00:29:28] PGC1-a via hypoxia.

[00:30:16] Barry Murray on my podcast.

[00:31:36] Altitude masks.

[00:32:02] Train high race low.

[00:32:24] Jeremy Powers on this podcast.

[00:34:43] gettingstronger.org

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Todd.Becker.on.2016-11-21.at.07_edited.mp3 Thu, 15 Dec 2016 14:12:37 GMT Christopher Kelly Hormetism is the application of progressive, intermittent stress to overcome challenges and grow stronger physically, mentally and emotionally. As athletes, we intuitively understand the hormetic effect of exercise but did you know that cold, altitude, plant toxins and even straining slightly to read can all be used to help us get stronger?

My guest is for this interview is Todd Becker, a freelance blogger based in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he lives with his wife and two children. He has degrees in Chemical Engineering and Philosophy from Stanford University and Brown University.  Todd currently works as a staff scientist for a biotechnology company in Palo Alto, where he leads project teams and holds more than 20 patents.
 
Not everyone will have access to all of the hormetic stressors we talk about in this episode. The important takeaway message is that there's more than one way to get stronger. Take advantage in whatever way you see fit.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Todd Becker:

[00:00:24] Myopia: A Modern Yet Reversible Disease.

[00:00:53] AHS16 - Todd Becker - Living High and Healthy.

[00:01:48] Hormesis.

[00:02:35] Low-carb and intermittent fasting.

[00:03:58] Going on holiday and forgetting glasses.

[00:04:40] Print pushing.

[00:05:02] Exercise.

[00:05:29] Immune system.

[00:06:07] UV.

[00:06:13] Overcompensation.

[00:07:28] Lactose tolerance.

[00:08:35] Unnecessarily avoiding the sun.

[00:10:05] Finding the perfect amount of stress.

[00:12:15] Learning to fast blog post.

[00:13:00] Heart rate variability or even just resting HR.

[00:14:02] Cold showers.

[00:14:43] Alcohol.

[00:15:53] Metabolic flexibility.

[00:16:08] Allostasis.

[00:17:07] Wood smoke.

[00:17:25] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:17:41] Is charred meat bad for you?

[00:18:29] Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human.

[00:19:02] Phases of detoxification.

[00:19:17] CYP3A4.

[00:19:42] Superoxide dismutase.

[00:20:01] Sulforaphane and Its Effects on Cancer, Mortality, Aging, Brain and Behavior, Heart Disease & More.

[00:21:28] Low-dose dioxins.

[00:21:53] Hormone analogues.

[00:22:14] Gluten.

[00:22:40] IgE emergency response.

[00:22:50] An Epidemic of Absence: A New Way of Understanding Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases.

[00:23:36] Peanut allergies

[00:23:56] Karelia (historical province of Finland).

[00:25:00] Reversing peanut allergies.

[00:25:22] Poison ivy and oak.

[00:26:49] Peanut oil in diaper cream.

[00:27:06] Oral vs topical exposure.

[00:27:23] Epstein–Barr virus infection at certain ages.

[00:28:09] Altitude.

[00:28:24] Boulder has the lowest obesity rate in the US.

[00:29:28] PGC1-a via hypoxia.

[00:30:16] Barry Murray on my podcast.

[00:31:36] Altitude masks.

[00:32:02] Train high race low.

[00:32:24] Jeremy Powers on this podcast.

[00:34:43] gettingstronger.org

]]>
clean
How to Teach Machines That Can Learn https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Pedro.Domingos.at.2016.11.14.mp3 Machine learning is fast becoming a part of our lives. From the order in which your search results and news feeds are ordered to the image classifiers and speech recognition features on your smartphone. Machine learning may even have had a hand in choosing your spouse or driving you to work. As with cars, only the mechanics need to understand what happens under the hood, but all drivers need to know how to operate the steering wheel. Listen to this podcast to learn how to interact with machines that can learn, and about the implications for humanity.

My guest is Dr. Pedro Domingos, Professor of Computer Science at Washington University. He is the author or co-author of over 200 technical publications in machine learning and data mining, and the author of my new favourite book The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Pedro Domingos, PhD:

[00:01:55] Deep Learning.

[00:02:21] Machine learning is affecting everyone's lives.

[00:03:45] Recommender systems.

[00:03:57] Ordering newsfeeds.

[00:04:25] Text prediction and speech recognition in smart phones.

[00:04:54] Accelerometers.

[00:04:54] Selecting job applicants.

[00:05:05] Finding a spouse.

[00:05:35] OKCupid.com.

[00:06:49] Robot scientists.

[00:07:08] Artificially-intelligent Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could boost search for new drugs.

[00:08:38] Cancer research.

[00:10:27] Central dogma of molecular biology.

[00:10:34] DNA microarrays.

[00:11:34] Robb Wolf at IHMC: Darwinian Medicine: Maybe there IS something to this evolution thing.

[00:12:29] It costs more to find the data than to do the experiment again (ref?)

[00:13:11] Making connections people could never make.

[00:14:00] Jeremy Howard’s TED talk: The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn.

[00:14:14] Pedro's TED talk: The Quest for the Master Algorithm.

[00:15:49] Craig Venter: your immune system on the Internet.

[00:16:44] Continuous blood glucose monitoring and Heart Rate Variability.

[00:17:41] Our data: DUTCH, OAT, stool, blood.

[00:19:21] Supervised and unsupervised learning.

[00:20:11] Clustering dimensionality reduction, e.g. PCA and T-SNE.

[00:21:44] Sodium to potassium ratio versus cortisol.

[00:22:24] Eosinophils.

[00:23:17] Clinical trials.

[00:24:35] Tetiana Ivanova - How to become a Data Scientist in 6 months a hacker’s approach to career planning.

[00:25:02] Deep Learning Book.

[00:25:46] Maths as a barrier to entry.

[00:27:09] Andrew Ng Coursera Machine Learning course.

[00:27:28] Pedro's Data Mining course.

[00:27:50] Theano and Keras.

[00:28:02] State Farm Distracted Driver Detection Kaggle competition.

[00:29:37] Nearest Neighbour algorithm.

[00:30:29] Driverless cars.

[00:30:41] Is a robot going to take my job?

[00:31:29] Jobs will not be lost, they will be transformed

[00:33:14] Automate your job yourself!

[00:33:27] Centaur chess player.

[00:35:32] ML is like driving, you can only learn by doing it.

[00:35:52] A Few Useful Things to Know about Machine Learning.

[00:37:00] Blood chemistry software.

[00:37:30] We are the owners of our data.

[00:38:49] Data banks and unions.

[00:40:01] The distinction with privacy.

[00:40:29] An ethical obligation to share.

[00:41:46] Data vulcanisation.

[00:42:40] Teaching the machine.

[00:43:07] Chrome incognito mode.

[00:44:13] Why can't we interact with the algorithm?

[00:45:33] New P2 Instance Type for Amazon EC2 – Up to 16 GPUs.

[00:46:01] Why now?

[00:46:47] Research breakthroughs.

[00:47:04] The amount of data.

[00:47:13] Hardware.

[00:47:31] GPUs, Moore’s law.

[00:47:57] Economics.

[00:48:32] Google TensorFlow.

[00:49:05] Facebook Torch.

[00:49:38] Recruiting.

[00:50:58] The five tribes of machine learning: evolutionaries, connectionists, Bayesians, analogizers, symbolists.

[00:51:55] Grand unified theory of ML.

[00:53:40] Decision tree ensembles (Random Forests).

[00:53:45] XGBoost.

[00:53:54] Weka.

[00:54:21] Alchemy: Open Source AI.

[00:56:16] Still do a computer science degree.

[00:56:54] Minor in probability and statistics.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Pedro.Domingos.at.2016.11.14.mp3 Thu, 08 Dec 2016 13:12:06 GMT Christopher Kelly Machine learning is fast becoming a part of our lives. From the order in which your search results and news feeds are ordered to the image classifiers and speech recognition features on your smartphone. Machine learning may even have had a hand in choosing your spouse or driving you to work. As with cars, only the mechanics need to understand what happens under the hood, but all drivers need to know how to operate the steering wheel. Listen to this podcast to learn how to interact with machines that can learn, and about the implications for humanity.

My guest is Dr. Pedro Domingos, Professor of Computer Science at Washington University. He is the author or co-author of over 200 technical publications in machine learning and data mining, and the author of my new favourite book The Master Algorithm: How the Quest for the Ultimate Learning Machine Will Remake Our World.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Pedro Domingos, PhD:

[00:01:55] Deep Learning.

[00:02:21] Machine learning is affecting everyone's lives.

[00:03:45] Recommender systems.

[00:03:57] Ordering newsfeeds.

[00:04:25] Text prediction and speech recognition in smart phones.

[00:04:54] Accelerometers.

[00:04:54] Selecting job applicants.

[00:05:05] Finding a spouse.

[00:05:35] OKCupid.com.

[00:06:49] Robot scientists.

[00:07:08] Artificially-intelligent Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could boost search for new drugs.

[00:08:38] Cancer research.

[00:10:27] Central dogma of molecular biology.

[00:10:34] DNA microarrays.

[00:11:34] Robb Wolf at IHMC: Darwinian Medicine: Maybe there IS something to this evolution thing.

[00:12:29] It costs more to find the data than to do the experiment again (ref?)

[00:13:11] Making connections people could never make.

[00:14:00] Jeremy Howard’s TED talk: The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn.

[00:14:14] Pedro's TED talk: The Quest for the Master Algorithm.

[00:15:49] Craig Venter: your immune system on the Internet.

[00:16:44] Continuous blood glucose monitoring and Heart Rate Variability.

[00:17:41] Our data: DUTCH, OAT, stool, blood.

[00:19:21] Supervised and unsupervised learning.

[00:20:11] Clustering dimensionality reduction, e.g. PCA and T-SNE.

[00:21:44] Sodium to potassium ratio versus cortisol.

[00:22:24] Eosinophils.

[00:23:17] Clinical trials.

[00:24:35] Tetiana Ivanova - How to become a Data Scientist in 6 months a hacker’s approach to career planning.

[00:25:02] Deep Learning Book.

[00:25:46] Maths as a barrier to entry.

[00:27:09] Andrew Ng Coursera Machine Learning course.

[00:27:28] Pedro's Data Mining course.

[00:27:50] Theano and Keras.

[00:28:02] State Farm Distracted Driver Detection Kaggle competition.

[00:29:37] Nearest Neighbour algorithm.

[00:30:29] Driverless cars.

[00:30:41] Is a robot going to take my job?

[00:31:29] Jobs will not be lost, they will be transformed

[00:33:14] Automate your job yourself!

[00:33:27] Centaur chess player.

[00:35:32] ML is like driving, you can only learn by doing it.

[00:35:52] A Few Useful Things to Know about Machine Learning.

[00:37:00] Blood chemistry software.

[00:37:30] We are the owners of our data.

[00:38:49] Data banks and unions.

[00:40:01] The distinction with privacy.

[00:40:29] An ethical obligation to share.

[00:41:46] Data vulcanisation.

[00:42:40] Teaching the machine.

[00:43:07] Chrome incognito mode.

[00:44:13] Why can't we interact with the algorithm?

[00:45:33] New P2 Instance Type for Amazon EC2 – Up to 16 GPUs.

[00:46:01] Why now?

[00:46:47] Research breakthroughs.

[00:47:04] The amount of data.

[00:47:13] Hardware.

[00:47:31] GPUs, Moore’s law.

[00:47:57] Economics.

[00:48:32] Google TensorFlow.

[00:49:05] Facebook Torch.

[00:49:38] Recruiting.

[00:50:58] The five tribes of machine learning: evolutionaries, connectionists, Bayesians, analogizers, symbolists.

[00:51:55] Grand unified theory of ML.

[00:53:40] Decision tree ensembles (Random Forests).

[00:53:45] XGBoost.

[00:53:54] Weka.

[00:54:21] Alchemy: Open Source AI.

[00:56:16] Still do a computer science degree.

[00:56:54] Minor in probability and statistics.

]]>
clean
How to Use Biomedical Testing for IRONMAN Performance https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Bob.McRae.on.2016-11-15.at.11.00_edited_full.mp3 After a rocky start to the season, NBT client Bob McRae turned everything around using our performance orientated functional medicine program for athletes. "I had the best race of my life yesterday, beyond my imagination." said 47-year old McRae, after his first age-group win (by 14-minutes) and 6th overall at IRONMAN Boulder.

Bob is now the number one USAT ranked athlete in his age group.
 
Listen to this podcast to discover how Bob used a combination of blood chemistry, urinary organic acids and hormone testing, stool culturomics together with diet and lifestyle modification and NSF certified nutritional supplements to achieve peak triathlon performance.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Bob McRae:

[00:04:22] Dr. Phil Maffetone.

[00:09:06] Quest Diagnostics.

[00:09:22] Fat Black podcast.

[00:11:26] IRONMAN Boulder and Kona.

[00:11:47] Bob was unable to elevate his heart rate.

[00:13:10] GI symptoms affected racing.

[00:13:38] Blastocystis was found on a BioHealth 401H stool test, gone on retest.

[00:13:39] Candida overgrowth found on a Great Plains urinary organic acids test.

[00:13:47] Elevated lysozyme (an enzyme secreted at the site of inflammation in the GI tract) on Doctor’s Data stool test.

[00:13:59] Elevation of white blood cells (eosinophils) on a blood chemistry.

[00:15:55] Whole30.

[00:16:16] Eliminating sugar, dairy and grains.

[00:17:23] Bob has reintroduced sprouted grains.

[00:19:03] Bob’s daughter has resolved her skin issues eating the same diet.

[00:20:35] Elevated TSH and Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Antibodies, both now getting better.

[00:22:59] Travelling for triathlon.

[00:26:41] Mass start in Kona.

[00:26:56] Clif Bar Triathlon Start Commercial.

[00:29:44] 1:02 swim.

[00:30:15] Working with swim coach and drafting.

[00:30:46] Muse meditation device.

[00:33:03] EmWave2.

[00:33:30] Fat Black podcast #187.

[00:33:45] Headspace.

[00:34:51] Daniela Ryf.

[00:35:57] Andrew Messick CEO of IRONMAN.

[00:39:32] First Endurance EFS drink.

[00:44:16] Dr. Keith Runyan on my podcast.

[00:45:18] 9:45 top 20 in the world.

[00:48:14] Elevation of methylmalonic on a urinary organic acids test indicates a deficiency of vitamin B12.

[00:48:42] DUTCH.

[00:49:18] Iron Rambler blog.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Bob.McRae.on.2016-11-15.at.11.00_edited_full.mp3 Thu, 01 Dec 2016 17:12:12 GMT Christopher Kelly After a rocky start to the season, NBT client Bob McRae turned everything around using our performance orientated functional medicine program for athletes. "I had the best race of my life yesterday, beyond my imagination." said 47-year old McRae, after his first age-group win (by 14-minutes) and 6th overall at IRONMAN Boulder.

Bob is now the number one USAT ranked athlete in his age group.
 
Listen to this podcast to discover how Bob used a combination of blood chemistry, urinary organic acids and hormone testing, stool culturomics together with diet and lifestyle modification and NSF certified nutritional supplements to achieve peak triathlon performance.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Bob McRae:

[00:04:22] Dr. Phil Maffetone.

[00:09:06] Quest Diagnostics.

[00:09:22] Fat Black podcast.

[00:11:26] IRONMAN Boulder and Kona.

[00:11:47] Bob was unable to elevate his heart rate.

[00:13:10] GI symptoms affected racing.

[00:13:38] Blastocystis was found on a BioHealth 401H stool test, gone on retest.

[00:13:39] Candida overgrowth found on a Great Plains urinary organic acids test.

[00:13:47] Elevated lysozyme (an enzyme secreted at the site of inflammation in the GI tract) on Doctor’s Data stool test.

[00:13:59] Elevation of white blood cells (eosinophils) on a blood chemistry.

[00:15:55] Whole30.

[00:16:16] Eliminating sugar, dairy and grains.

[00:17:23] Bob has reintroduced sprouted grains.

[00:19:03] Bob’s daughter has resolved her skin issues eating the same diet.

[00:20:35] Elevated TSH and Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Antibodies, both now getting better.

[00:22:59] Travelling for triathlon.

[00:26:41] Mass start in Kona.

[00:26:56] Clif Bar Triathlon Start Commercial.

[00:29:44] 1:02 swim.

[00:30:15] Working with swim coach and drafting.

[00:30:46] Muse meditation device.

[00:33:03] EmWave2.

[00:33:30] Fat Black podcast #187.

[00:33:45] Headspace.

[00:34:51] Daniela Ryf.

[00:35:57] Andrew Messick CEO of IRONMAN.

[00:39:32] First Endurance EFS drink.

[00:44:16] Dr. Keith Runyan on my podcast.

[00:45:18] 9:45 top 20 in the world.

[00:48:14] Elevation of methylmalonic on a urinary organic acids test indicates a deficiency of vitamin B12.

[00:48:42] DUTCH.

[00:49:18] Iron Rambler blog.

]]>
clean
A New Hope for Brain Tumors https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Adrienne.Scheck.on.2016-10-26.at.11.12.mp3 This year in the United States, over 22,000 people will be diagnosed with a primary brain or spinal tumor. Of these, more than 13,000, many of them younger than 21 years old, will die of their disease. New treatment modalities are critical in the battle against cancer.

Adrienne Scheck, PhD, is an associate professor of neurobiology at Barrow Neurological Institute.

Dr. Scheck’s expertise includes neuro-oncology. She is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, Society for Neuro-Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Women in Cancer Research, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Dr. Scheck’s work consists mainly of translational research to develop novel adjuvant therapies for the treatment of brain tumors. She also use various molecular and molecular genetic techniques to investigate why current therapies sometimes fail.
 

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Adrienne Scheck:

[00:00:37] Dr. Jong M Rho.

[00:01:18] Glioblastoma.

[00:03:53] Hanahan, Douglas, and Robert A. Weinberg. "Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation." cell 144.5 (2011): 646-674.

[00:05:01] Cancer metabolism: see Tripping Over the Truth: The Return of the Metabolic Theory of Cancer Illuminates a New and Hopeful Path to a Cure.

[00:05:37] Positron emission tomography (PET).

[00:06:20] Thomas Seyfried: Cancer: A Metabolic Disease With Metabolic Solutions.

[00:07:21] Adding ketones to a in vitro model.

[00:09:14] Poff, Angela M., et al. "The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer." PloS one 8.6 (2013): e65522.

[00:11:38] 4:1 KetoCal.

[00:13:14] Dr. Cate Shanahan at the Keto Summit.

[00:15:05] Ketogenic Diet With Radiation and Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma.

[00:17:08] Charlie Foundation and Matthew's Friends.

[00:21:42] Clinical trial diet is as close to 4:1 as possible.

[00:22:09] Ketogenic Mealplanner – Electronic Ketogenic Manager (EKM).

[00:23:01] Cachexia.

[00:24:09] Ketones of 3mM, glucose of 4mM.

[00:25:59] Adrienne gave a talk in Banff but I couldn’t find it online.

[00:26:23] Trial eligibility.

[00:30:29] Confounding lifestyle factors.

[00:32:58] MRI for tumor metabolism .

[00:34:25] Is there something special about brain tumors that makes them particularly susceptible?

[00:35:25] Dominic D'Agostino on my podcast and the Keto Summit.

[00:35:48] Edema, angiogenesis, and inflammation.

[00:37:36] Lussier, Danielle M., et al. "Enhanced immunity in a mouse model of malignant glioma is mediated by a therapeutic ketogenic diet." BMC cancer16.1 (2016): 1.

[00:40:14] Gut microbiome.

[00:41:50] Ketone supplementation.

[00:47:54] Effects in cancer patients may be different from in a healthy person.

[00:48:45] Students Supporting Brain Tumor Research.

[00:50:35] MaxLove Project.

[00:50:47] Donations.

[00:52:28] Finding a physician and a dietician.

[00:55:13] Education for dietitians and practitioners.

[00:57:51] Pluripotency.

[00:58:55] Adam Sorenson and father Brad.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Adrienne.Scheck.on.2016-10-26.at.11.12.mp3 Fri, 25 Nov 2016 08:11:58 GMT Christopher Kelly This year in the United States, over 22,000 people will be diagnosed with a primary brain or spinal tumor. Of these, more than 13,000, many of them younger than 21 years old, will die of their disease. New treatment modalities are critical in the battle against cancer.

Adrienne Scheck, PhD, is an associate professor of neurobiology at Barrow Neurological Institute.

Dr. Scheck’s expertise includes neuro-oncology. She is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, Society for Neuro-Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Women in Cancer Research, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Dr. Scheck’s work consists mainly of translational research to develop novel adjuvant therapies for the treatment of brain tumors. She also use various molecular and molecular genetic techniques to investigate why current therapies sometimes fail.
 

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Adrienne Scheck:

[00:00:37] Dr. Jong M Rho.

[00:01:18] Glioblastoma.

[00:03:53] Hanahan, Douglas, and Robert A. Weinberg. "Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation." cell 144.5 (2011): 646-674.

[00:05:01] Cancer metabolism: see Tripping Over the Truth: The Return of the Metabolic Theory of Cancer Illuminates a New and Hopeful Path to a Cure.

[00:05:37] Positron emission tomography (PET).

[00:06:20] Thomas Seyfried: Cancer: A Metabolic Disease With Metabolic Solutions.

[00:07:21] Adding ketones to a in vitro model.

[00:09:14] Poff, Angela M., et al. "The ketogenic diet and hyperbaric oxygen therapy prolong survival in mice with systemic metastatic cancer." PloS one 8.6 (2013): e65522.

[00:11:38] 4:1 KetoCal.

[00:13:14] Dr. Cate Shanahan at the Keto Summit.

[00:15:05] Ketogenic Diet With Radiation and Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma.

[00:17:08] Charlie Foundation and Matthew's Friends.

[00:21:42] Clinical trial diet is as close to 4:1 as possible.

[00:22:09] Ketogenic Mealplanner – Electronic Ketogenic Manager (EKM).

[00:23:01] Cachexia.

[00:24:09] Ketones of 3mM, glucose of 4mM.

[00:25:59] Adrienne gave a talk in Banff but I couldn’t find it online.

[00:26:23] Trial eligibility.

[00:30:29] Confounding lifestyle factors.

[00:32:58] MRI for tumor metabolism .

[00:34:25] Is there something special about brain tumors that makes them particularly susceptible?

[00:35:25] Dominic D'Agostino on my podcast and the Keto Summit.

[00:35:48] Edema, angiogenesis, and inflammation.

[00:37:36] Lussier, Danielle M., et al. "Enhanced immunity in a mouse model of malignant glioma is mediated by a therapeutic ketogenic diet." BMC cancer16.1 (2016): 1.

[00:40:14] Gut microbiome.

[00:41:50] Ketone supplementation.

[00:47:54] Effects in cancer patients may be different from in a healthy person.

[00:48:45] Students Supporting Brain Tumor Research.

[00:50:35] MaxLove Project.

[00:50:47] Donations.

[00:52:28] Finding a physician and a dietician.

[00:55:13] Education for dietitians and practitioners.

[00:57:51] Pluripotency.

[00:58:55] Adam Sorenson and father Brad.

]]>
clean
Pro Tour Rider Nutrition and the Benefits of Fasted-State Training https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Barry.Murray.on.2016-10-12.at.10.42.mp3 Barry Murray is a sports nutritionist and member of the Irish Ultramarathon Team currently working with Pro Tour cyclists. Barry has won several ultra-distance (70-200 km) running races, The Mourne Mountain Way, The Abbots Way, The Giants Causeway, The Wicklow Way, The Kerry Way, all without eating anything for breakfast. How? In a word, fat-adaptation.

In this interview, Barry describes his work with the pros and six much overlooked factors for high-performance ultra-endurance training: sunlight, cold thermogenesis, DHA from seafood, grounding, and water quality.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Barry Murray:

[00:01:56] BMC Racing Team.

[00:02:06] Ultramarathon.

[00:05:39] Low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic.

[00:06:14] Fasted state training.

[00:07:16] Sirtuins.

[00:12:38] AMP kinase.

[00:13:35] Beta-oxidation.

[00:13:44] Mitochondrial biogenesis.

[00:15:20] Acetyl-CoA.

[00:15:38] Peter Attia, MD.

[00:16:03] Stepwise adaptation.

[00:18:38] What are the pro cyclists doing?

[00:19:35] Nutrition is the new doping.

[00:23:00] Team Sky.

[00:23:55] Steve Cummins.

[00:24:29] 2-3 years to adapt.

[00:26:00] Can be done in 6-12 months.

[00:27:04] Train low, race high.

[00:28:26] Rates of brain glucose use.

[00:29:30] Pyruvate dehydrogenase.

[00:30:34] Ketone MonoEster article.

[00:31:21] Are the pros using ketone supplements?

[00:32:05] Chris Froome.

[00:32:33] Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:34:00] Beta-oxidation is the goal, not ketogenesis.

[00:35:16] Jack Kruse.

[00:37:11] Six things to optimal health and living.

[00:37:30] Sunlight.

[00:37:53] Cold thermogenesis.

[00:38:05] Seafood.

[00:38:18] Grounding.

[00:38:25] Non-fluoridated water.

[00:39:55] UVB tanning booths.

[00:40:37] Schumann resonance.

[00:41:38] Electron Transport Chain (ETC)

[00:43:44] Sven Tuft of Orica Bike Exchange.

[00:44:45] Wim Hof.

[00:45:30] Kox, Matthijs, et al. "Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.20 (2014): 7379-7384.

[00:48:28] http://optimumnutrition4sport.co.uk/

[00:48:56] Fasted State Training Adaptations Jack Kruse forum post.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Barry.Murray.on.2016-10-12.at.10.42.mp3 Fri, 18 Nov 2016 07:11:30 GMT Christopher Kelly Barry Murray is a sports nutritionist and member of the Irish Ultramarathon Team currently working with Pro Tour cyclists. Barry has won several ultra-distance (70-200 km) running races, The Mourne Mountain Way, The Abbots Way, The Giants Causeway, The Wicklow Way, The Kerry Way, all without eating anything for breakfast. How? In a word, fat-adaptation.

In this interview, Barry describes his work with the pros and six much overlooked factors for high-performance ultra-endurance training: sunlight, cold thermogenesis, DHA from seafood, grounding, and water quality.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Barry Murray:

[00:01:56] BMC Racing Team.

[00:02:06] Ultramarathon.

[00:05:39] Low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic.

[00:06:14] Fasted state training.

[00:07:16] Sirtuins.

[00:12:38] AMP kinase.

[00:13:35] Beta-oxidation.

[00:13:44] Mitochondrial biogenesis.

[00:15:20] Acetyl-CoA.

[00:15:38] Peter Attia, MD.

[00:16:03] Stepwise adaptation.

[00:18:38] What are the pro cyclists doing?

[00:19:35] Nutrition is the new doping.

[00:23:00] Team Sky.

[00:23:55] Steve Cummins.

[00:24:29] 2-3 years to adapt.

[00:26:00] Can be done in 6-12 months.

[00:27:04] Train low, race high.

[00:28:26] Rates of brain glucose use.

[00:29:30] Pyruvate dehydrogenase.

[00:30:34] Ketone MonoEster article.

[00:31:21] Are the pros using ketone supplements?

[00:32:05] Chris Froome.

[00:32:33] Cox, Pete J., et al. "Nutritional ketosis alters fuel preference and thereby endurance performance in athletes." Cell Metabolism 24.2 (2016): 256-268.

[00:34:00] Beta-oxidation is the goal, not ketogenesis.

[00:35:16] Jack Kruse.

[00:37:11] Six things to optimal health and living.

[00:37:30] Sunlight.

[00:37:53] Cold thermogenesis.

[00:38:05] Seafood.

[00:38:18] Grounding.

[00:38:25] Non-fluoridated water.

[00:39:55] UVB tanning booths.

[00:40:37] Schumann resonance.

[00:41:38] Electron Transport Chain (ETC)

[00:43:44] Sven Tuft of Orica Bike Exchange.

[00:44:45] Wim Hof.

[00:45:30] Kox, Matthijs, et al. "Voluntary activation of the sympathetic nervous system and attenuation of the innate immune response in humans." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.20 (2014): 7379-7384.

[00:48:28] http://optimumnutrition4sport.co.uk/

[00:48:56] Fasted State Training Adaptations Jack Kruse forum post.

]]>
clean
How to Achieve Near-Normal Blood Sugar with Type 1 Diabetes https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Keith.Runyan.on.2016-10-05.at.10_edited__001.mp3 Dr. Keith Runyan, MD is a retired physician previously in private practice in St. Petersburg, Florida. Dr. Runyan specialised in internal medicine, nephrology, and obesity medicine. He practiced emergency medicine for ten years before starting his private practice in 2001.

In February 2012, he began the diet for the treatment of is diabetes and learned that this diet was also effective for the treatment of numerous other conditions, including obesity. He added obesity medicine to his practice and became board-certified in obesity medicine in December 2012. Dr. Runyan completed an Ironman-distance triathlon on October 20, 2012, in a state of nutritional ketosis and feeling great.
 
In 1998, he developed type 1 diabetes at the age of 38. Dr. Runyan controlled his diabetes was fairly well with intensive insulin therapy but was plagued with frequent hypoglycaemic episodes. In 2011, while training for an Ironman-distance triathlon, Dr. Runyan was looking for a better way to treat his diabetes and perform endurance exercise, and he decided to give the low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet a try.
 
I’d like to extend special thanks to RD Dikeman and Kory Seder of the TYPEONEGRIT Facebook group for providing me with many of the questions I ask Dr. Runyan during this interview.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Keith Runyan, MD:

[00:00:21] Keto Summit all access pass.

[00:02:50] Blood sugar 489 mg/dL.

[00:04:20] Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA).

[00:05:01] Beta-cell destruction.

[00:05:19] Epidemiological: viral infection, oral antibiotics, cow's milk (casein), cereals.

[00:07:28] NPH basal insulin (delayed).

[00:11:14] Glucagon.

[00:13:42] Hypoglycaemic episodes.

[00:14:19] Triathlon.

[00:16:07] IMTalk Episode 264 - Loren Cordain on the Paleo Diet.

[00:17:07] Jimmy Moore podcast.

[00:17:22] Robb Wolf.

[00:17:32] Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution.

[00:20:52] Continuous glucose monitor.

[00:22:34] Keith's blog: Ketogenic Diabetic Athlete.

[00:22:50] TYPEONEGRIT Facebook group.

[00:23:25] A day in the life of Dr. Runyan.

[00:24:37] Consistency is key.

[00:25:14] US Wellness Meats Liverwurst.

[00:26:28] Humalog insulin, finished in 2.5 hours.

[00:27:53] Exercise is key for insulin sensitivity.

[00:28:46] Swimming, weightlifting.

[00:29:05] Lantin insulin.

[00:30:16] Impact of different types of exercise on insulin sensitivity.

[00:31:31] Insulin sensitivity follows a circadian rhythm.

[00:34:54] Dr. Phil Maffetone.

[00:38:09] Powerlifting vs. Olympic lifting.

[00:38:31] Greg Everett at Catalyst Athletics.

[00:40:12] Carb cravings.

[00:41:43] Artificial pancreas.

[00:43:24] No more hypoglycaemia in ketosis.

[00:44:56] No correlation between blood BHB and symptoms.

[00:45:41] The value of lack thereof, of measuring blood BHB.

[00:47:30] Glycated proteins in the kidneys.

[00:47:50] High-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

[00:49:16] Ketosis for type 1 in children.

[00:50:09] 1.2g per kg protein.

[00:51:38] Vision for spreading the word.

[00:52:29] Medicine is an oil tanker.

[00:53:54] Dr. Runyan's books for type 1 and type 2.

[00:54:50] Ellen Davis of Ketogenic-Diet-Resource.com.

[00:55:45] "Normal" blood sugars.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Keith.Runyan.on.2016-10-05.at.10_edited__001.mp3 Fri, 11 Nov 2016 07:11:29 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr. Keith Runyan, MD is a retired physician previously in private practice in St. Petersburg, Florida. Dr. Runyan specialised in internal medicine, nephrology, and obesity medicine. He practiced emergency medicine for ten years before starting his private practice in 2001.

In February 2012, he began the diet for the treatment of is diabetes and learned that this diet was also effective for the treatment of numerous other conditions, including obesity. He added obesity medicine to his practice and became board-certified in obesity medicine in December 2012. Dr. Runyan completed an Ironman-distance triathlon on October 20, 2012, in a state of nutritional ketosis and feeling great.
 
In 1998, he developed type 1 diabetes at the age of 38. Dr. Runyan controlled his diabetes was fairly well with intensive insulin therapy but was plagued with frequent hypoglycaemic episodes. In 2011, while training for an Ironman-distance triathlon, Dr. Runyan was looking for a better way to treat his diabetes and perform endurance exercise, and he decided to give the low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet a try.
 
I’d like to extend special thanks to RD Dikeman and Kory Seder of the TYPEONEGRIT Facebook group for providing me with many of the questions I ask Dr. Runyan during this interview.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Keith Runyan, MD:

[00:00:21] Keto Summit all access pass.

[00:02:50] Blood sugar 489 mg/dL.

[00:04:20] Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA).

[00:05:01] Beta-cell destruction.

[00:05:19] Epidemiological: viral infection, oral antibiotics, cow's milk (casein), cereals.

[00:07:28] NPH basal insulin (delayed).

[00:11:14] Glucagon.

[00:13:42] Hypoglycaemic episodes.

[00:14:19] Triathlon.

[00:16:07] IMTalk Episode 264 - Loren Cordain on the Paleo Diet.

[00:17:07] Jimmy Moore podcast.

[00:17:22] Robb Wolf.

[00:17:32] Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution.

[00:20:52] Continuous glucose monitor.

[00:22:34] Keith's blog: Ketogenic Diabetic Athlete.

[00:22:50] TYPEONEGRIT Facebook group.

[00:23:25] A day in the life of Dr. Runyan.

[00:24:37] Consistency is key.

[00:25:14] US Wellness Meats Liverwurst.

[00:26:28] Humalog insulin, finished in 2.5 hours.

[00:27:53] Exercise is key for insulin sensitivity.

[00:28:46] Swimming, weightlifting.

[00:29:05] Lantin insulin.

[00:30:16] Impact of different types of exercise on insulin sensitivity.

[00:31:31] Insulin sensitivity follows a circadian rhythm.

[00:34:54] Dr. Phil Maffetone.

[00:38:09] Powerlifting vs. Olympic lifting.

[00:38:31] Greg Everett at Catalyst Athletics.

[00:40:12] Carb cravings.

[00:41:43] Artificial pancreas.

[00:43:24] No more hypoglycaemia in ketosis.

[00:44:56] No correlation between blood BHB and symptoms.

[00:45:41] The value of lack thereof, of measuring blood BHB.

[00:47:30] Glycated proteins in the kidneys.

[00:47:50] High-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

[00:49:16] Ketosis for type 1 in children.

[00:50:09] 1.2g per kg protein.

[00:51:38] Vision for spreading the word.

[00:52:29] Medicine is an oil tanker.

[00:53:54] Dr. Runyan's books for type 1 and type 2.

[00:54:50] Ellen Davis of Ketogenic-Diet-Resource.com.

[00:55:45] "Normal" blood sugars.

]]>
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How to Live Well with Chronic Illness https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mickey.Trescott.Angela.Alt.on.2016-09-07.at.10.01.mp3 Chris here, writing the show notes for this episode presented by my wife and food scientist Julia Kelly where she interviews Mickey Trescott, and Angie Alt. I’ve talked a lot about ketogenic diets on the podcast, but the truth is ketosis is a hack to improve my cognition and athletic performance. Autoimmune Paleo (AIP) is the diet that enabled me to recover my health, and since then, we’ve coached hundreds of other athletes in our practice using a very similar approach.

With the diet cornerstone in place, I became curious about what else I could do to improve my health and athletic performance. Shortly after came my discovery of functional medicine and the hundreds, if not thousands, of other lifestyle factors that needed to be in place in order for me to have what I enjoy today.
 
The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook addresses the most important of those other lifestyle factors. Authors Mickey and Angie introduce a complementary solution that focuses on seven key steps to recovery: inform, collaborate, nourish, rest, breathe, move, and connect.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Julia Kelly, Mickey Trescott, and Angie Alt:

[00:01:43] The Paleo Mom.

[00:04:26] autoimmune-paleo.com

[00:07:22] The athlete's gut.

[00:08:46] Inform - be your own expert.

[00:09:24] Collaborate - build your team.

[00:13:15] Hashimoto's.

[00:16:10] Nourish - choosing what to eat.

[00:20:17] Movement - should you back off?

[00:24:33] Rest.

[00:26:37] Breath - managing stress.

[00:27:48] Spending time in nature.

[00:29:02] Social isolation.

[00:34:13] Recipes and meal planning.

[00:41:09] The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

[00:41:16] Autoimmune Paleo podcast.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Mickey.Trescott.Angela.Alt.on.2016-09-07.at.10.01.mp3 Thu, 03 Nov 2016 07:11:41 GMT Christopher Kelly Chris here, writing the show notes for this episode presented by my wife and food scientist Julia Kelly where she interviews Mickey Trescott, and Angie Alt. I’ve talked a lot about ketogenic diets on the podcast, but the truth is ketosis is a hack to improve my cognition and athletic performance. Autoimmune Paleo (AIP) is the diet that enabled me to recover my health, and since then, we’ve coached hundreds of other athletes in our practice using a very similar approach.

With the diet cornerstone in place, I became curious about what else I could do to improve my health and athletic performance. Shortly after came my discovery of functional medicine and the hundreds, if not thousands, of other lifestyle factors that needed to be in place in order for me to have what I enjoy today.
 
The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook addresses the most important of those other lifestyle factors. Authors Mickey and Angie introduce a complementary solution that focuses on seven key steps to recovery: inform, collaborate, nourish, rest, breathe, move, and connect.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Julia Kelly, Mickey Trescott, and Angie Alt:

[00:01:43] The Paleo Mom.

[00:04:26] autoimmune-paleo.com

[00:07:22] The athlete's gut.

[00:08:46] Inform - be your own expert.

[00:09:24] Collaborate - build your team.

[00:13:15] Hashimoto's.

[00:16:10] Nourish - choosing what to eat.

[00:20:17] Movement - should you back off?

[00:24:33] Rest.

[00:26:37] Breath - managing stress.

[00:27:48] Spending time in nature.

[00:29:02] Social isolation.

[00:34:13] Recipes and meal planning.

[00:41:09] The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook: A DIY Guide to Living Well with Chronic Illness.

[00:41:16] Autoimmune Paleo podcast.

]]>
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Methylation and Environmental Pollutants with Dr. Tim Gerstmar https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Gerstmar.on.2016-09-28.at.10.mp3 Dr. Tim Gerstmar practices Naturopathic Medicine at his Redmond, WA office, Aspire Natural Health. He specialises in working with people with digestive and autoimmune problems, and has worked with many of the most difficult to treat situations using a blend of natural and conventional medicine. He treats patients locally, throughout the US and as far away as the Qatar, Korea and Australia.

In this interview, Dr. Tim talks about methylation, sequencing diet and lifestyle medicine, environmental pollutants, detoxification physiology and treatments plus much more!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tim Gerstmar, ND:

[00:04:22] Gut, autoimmune, hard-to-treat cases.

[00:05:21] Autism.

[00:06:20] Sequencing diet and lifestyle medicine.

[00:09:33] Dr. Gerstmar employs health coaches.

[00:10:33] 23andMe, penetrance.

[00:12:23] Robb Wolf.

[00:14:55] Environment toxicity.

[00:17:18] Toxicity and thyroid function.

[00:18:26] AHS 16 - Tim Gerstmar - Obesogens and Endocrine Disruptors.

[00:19:22] 100,000 chemicals into the environment since WWII.

[00:19:53] According to the EU, many haven't been adequately safety tested.

[00:23:05] Obvious exposure revealed via a detailed history.

[00:24:03] Scorecard.

[00:24:59] Surviving in a Toxic World: Nonmetal Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health with Dr. Bill Shaw, PhD.

[00:25:46] Xylene on the Genova organic acids test (it's also on the Great Plains TOX).

[00:30:43] Environmental Working Group Body Burden.

[00:32:38] Heavy metals: mercury, arsenic, lead.

[00:34:44] Fat soluble compounds.

[00:35:16] Nutrient dependencies for detoxification.

[00:36:12] Caloric restriction.

[00:36:38] Milk thistle.

[00:37:03] Sulforaphane Nrf2.

[00:37:47] Peeing and pooping.

[00:38:33] Sweating and sauna.

[00:38:58] Household chemicals.

[00:39:19] Flame retardants in clothing.

[00:40:18] EWG Dirty dozen and clean fifteen.

[00:40:50] Leaner cuts of meat.

[00:41:36] Mattresses.

[00:42:43] Niacin uses up methyl groups.

[00:43:51] Methylation and detoxification.

[00:44:37] Sequencing detoxification.

[00:45:20] Enterohepatic recirculation.

[00:47:31] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:48:08] The gut microbiome, glucuronidation bonds.

[00:49:07] Olestra.

[00:49:46] Rice bran, psyllium.

[00:51:21] Apple pectin.

[00:51:45] Aspire Natural Health.

[00:53:48] Preconception care for both men and women.

[00:56:29] Changing the political climate.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Gerstmar.on.2016-09-28.at.10.mp3 Thu, 27 Oct 2016 16:10:31 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr. Tim Gerstmar practices Naturopathic Medicine at his Redmond, WA office, Aspire Natural Health. He specialises in working with people with digestive and autoimmune problems, and has worked with many of the most difficult to treat situations using a blend of natural and conventional medicine. He treats patients locally, throughout the US and as far away as the Qatar, Korea and Australia.

In this interview, Dr. Tim talks about methylation, sequencing diet and lifestyle medicine, environmental pollutants, detoxification physiology and treatments plus much more!

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tim Gerstmar, ND:

[00:04:22] Gut, autoimmune, hard-to-treat cases.

[00:05:21] Autism.

[00:06:20] Sequencing diet and lifestyle medicine.

[00:09:33] Dr. Gerstmar employs health coaches.

[00:10:33] 23andMe, penetrance.

[00:12:23] Robb Wolf.

[00:14:55] Environment toxicity.

[00:17:18] Toxicity and thyroid function.

[00:18:26] AHS 16 - Tim Gerstmar - Obesogens and Endocrine Disruptors.

[00:19:22] 100,000 chemicals into the environment since WWII.

[00:19:53] According to the EU, many haven't been adequately safety tested.

[00:23:05] Obvious exposure revealed via a detailed history.

[00:24:03] Scorecard.

[00:24:59] Surviving in a Toxic World: Nonmetal Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health with Dr. Bill Shaw, PhD.

[00:25:46] Xylene on the Genova organic acids test (it's also on the Great Plains TOX).

[00:30:43] Environmental Working Group Body Burden.

[00:32:38] Heavy metals: mercury, arsenic, lead.

[00:34:44] Fat soluble compounds.

[00:35:16] Nutrient dependencies for detoxification.

[00:36:12] Caloric restriction.

[00:36:38] Milk thistle.

[00:37:03] Sulforaphane Nrf2.

[00:37:47] Peeing and pooping.

[00:38:33] Sweating and sauna.

[00:38:58] Household chemicals.

[00:39:19] Flame retardants in clothing.

[00:40:18] EWG Dirty dozen and clean fifteen.

[00:40:50] Leaner cuts of meat.

[00:41:36] Mattresses.

[00:42:43] Niacin uses up methyl groups.

[00:43:51] Methylation and detoxification.

[00:44:37] Sequencing detoxification.

[00:45:20] Enterohepatic recirculation.

[00:47:31] Evolutionary mismatches.

[00:48:08] The gut microbiome, glucuronidation bonds.

[00:49:07] Olestra.

[00:49:46] Rice bran, psyllium.

[00:51:21] Apple pectin.

[00:51:45] Aspire Natural Health.

[00:53:48] Preconception care for both men and women.

[00:56:29] Changing the political climate.

]]>
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Human Performance and Resilience in Extreme Environments https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Dawn.Kernagis.on.2016-09-28.at.12.42.mp3 Dr. Dawn Kernagis is a Research Scientist in the area of human performance optimization and risk mitigation for operators in extreme environments, such as those working in undersea diving, high altitude aviation, and space. Dr. Kernagis came to IHMC from Duke University Medical Center, where her postdoctoral research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the American Heart Association to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in multiple forms of acute brain injury.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Dawn Kernagis

[00:00:20] STEM-Talk podcast.

[00:01:35] Ken Ford.

[00:03:44] Keto Summit.

[00:04:06] Outside Magazine: Is the High-Fat, Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet Right for You?

[00:04:22] NEEMO expedition.

[00:08:30] The Twins Study was the first study of its kind to compare molecular profiles of identical twin astronauts with one in space and another on Earth.

[00:12:04] Apolipoprotein E (APOE).

[00:12:13] STEM-Talk Episode 12: Dale Bredesen Discusses The Metabolic Factors Underlying Alzheimer’s Disease.

[00:16:28] Apolipoprotein E4 protective against malaria?

[00:19:14] AHS 16 - Steven Gundry - Dietary Management of the Apo E4.

[00:20:37] STEM-Talk Episode 14: Dominic D'Agostino.

[00:21:28] Lauren Petersen: The Athlete Microbiome Project: The Search for the Golden Microbiome.

[00:22:55] A combination of 16S, metagenomic shotgun, and metatranscriptomic sequencing.

[00:29:48] Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 expression.

[00:31:16] Python, scikit-learn, TensorFlow.

[00:31:32] The R Project for Statistical Computing.

[00:33:15] MATLAB.

[00:34:10] STEM-TALK Episode 1: Peter Attia On How To Live Longer And Better.

[00:35:23] Swiss cheese model, Gareth Lock.

[00:40:48] Duke University.

[00:41:04] Richard Moon.

[00:42:59] NEEMO blog.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Dawn.Kernagis.on.2016-09-28.at.12.42.mp3 Fri, 21 Oct 2016 08:10:52 GMT Christopher Kelly Dr. Dawn Kernagis is a Research Scientist in the area of human performance optimization and risk mitigation for operators in extreme environments, such as those working in undersea diving, high altitude aviation, and space. Dr. Kernagis came to IHMC from Duke University Medical Center, where her postdoctoral research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the American Heart Association to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in multiple forms of acute brain injury.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Dawn Kernagis

[00:00:20] STEM-Talk podcast.

[00:01:35] Ken Ford.

[00:03:44] Keto Summit.

[00:04:06] Outside Magazine: Is the High-Fat, Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet Right for You?

[00:04:22] NEEMO expedition.

[00:08:30] The Twins Study was the first study of its kind to compare molecular profiles of identical twin astronauts with one in space and another on Earth.

[00:12:04] Apolipoprotein E (APOE).

[00:12:13] STEM-Talk Episode 12: Dale Bredesen Discusses The Metabolic Factors Underlying Alzheimer’s Disease.

[00:16:28] Apolipoprotein E4 protective against malaria?

[00:19:14] AHS 16 - Steven Gundry - Dietary Management of the Apo E4.

[00:20:37] STEM-Talk Episode 14: Dominic D'Agostino.

[00:21:28] Lauren Petersen: The Athlete Microbiome Project: The Search for the Golden Microbiome.

[00:22:55] A combination of 16S, metagenomic shotgun, and metatranscriptomic sequencing.

[00:29:48] Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 expression.

[00:31:16] Python, scikit-learn, TensorFlow.

[00:31:32] The R Project for Statistical Computing.

[00:33:15] MATLAB.

[00:34:10] STEM-TALK Episode 1: Peter Attia On How To Live Longer And Better.

[00:35:23] Swiss cheese model, Gareth Lock.

[00:40:48] Duke University.

[00:41:04] Richard Moon.

[00:42:59] NEEMO blog.

]]>
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How to Start a Functional Medicine Practice https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/AMA_edited_29.09.mp3 A Whole Health Educator and Personal Trainer from Mountain View, California asked me some questions about the FDN certification and since we get so many questions like the ones below, Tommy and I did a webinar to answer those and more, live.

The questions:

  • What health services did you offer before studying with FDN?  How did you integrate your new training into your service offerings at the beginning?
  • Have you been able to use FDN to build a solid/sustaining income and business model?  If so, how long did that ramp up process take?
  • What marketing initiatives/strategies have you tried?  Which worked best/least?
  • Were there additional/unforeseen start up costs?
  • What challenges have you had along the way to setting up business with FDN?  What might you have done differently?
  • What are your thoughts on the current lab testing that FDN recommends, as well as the supplement brands they have relationships with?  
  • Do you find that most of your income from FDN stems from patient sessions or from supplement income?  Some other avenue?

Here’s the outline of this webinar with Dr. Tommy Wood:

[00:03:25] Kalish Institute.

[00:05:54] Robb Wolf.

[00:06:27] Root cause of multiple sclerosis using engineering techniques (paper, talk for the public, talk for physicians).

[00:07:16] Tommy's blog.

[00:07:53] OAT, DUTCH, blood chemistry.

[00:09:09] Chris Kresser's ADAPT course.

[00:10:10] Bryan Walsh's Metabolic Fitness Pro biochemistry course.

[00:10:28] Khan Academy chemistry.

[00:13:31] Mark Sisson's Primal Health Coaching certification.

[00:14:59] Functional Diagnostic Nutrition.

[00:17:53] Coursera Physiology Course form Duke University.

[00:20:01] Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers.

[00:21:34] Jamie Kendall-Weed.

[00:24:06] Paleo Physicians Network.

[00:26:27] Tommy WOULD do it all again the same :)

[00:29:19] "A ticket to play the game"‒Physician's Assistant

[00:33:44] Student debt.

[00:35:35] How to Start a Startup.

[00:36:51] The Elite Performance Program (EPP).

[00:37:09] Ralston Consulting.

[00:37:49] Lisa Fraley, legal coach.

[00:38:08] Client agreements.

[00:39:53] Amelia.

[00:41:16] Jordan Reasoner podcast.

[00:42:33] Practitioner Liberation Project.

[00:43:24] Ben Greenfield podcast with Jamie.

[00:44:47] Zoom, Zendesk, Slack.

[00:45:02] ScheduleOnce.

[00:47:04] Trello.

[00:48:07] Google Drive

[00:48:48] HIPAA compliance.

[00:51:24] Data extraction and model building.

[00:51:45] Python Machine Learning.

[00:52:00] scikit-learn, TensorFlow.

[00:52:52] BioHealth Adrenal Stress Profile (saliva).

[00:53:17] BioHealth 101.

[00:53:53] Mediator Release Test (MRT).

[00:54:53] AIP, Whole30.

[00:55:13] Cyrex Labs.

[00:56:35] Aristo Vojdani.

[00:57:00] Ellen Langer.

[00:58:01] Align Podcast.

[00:58:26] Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

[00:59:10] Ron Rosedale.

[01:00:34] Keto Summit.

[01:01:04] PHAT FIBRE.

[01:03:21] PHAT COW!

[01:03:33] Fruition chocolate.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/AMA_edited_29.09.mp3 Fri, 14 Oct 2016 08:10:45 GMT Christopher Kelly A Whole Health Educator and Personal Trainer from Mountain View, California asked me some questions about the FDN certification and since we get so many questions like the ones below, Tommy and I did a webinar to answer those and more, live.

The questions:

  • What health services did you offer before studying with FDN?  How did you integrate your new training into your service offerings at the beginning?
  • Have you been able to use FDN to build a solid/sustaining income and business model?  If so, how long did that ramp up process take?
  • What marketing initiatives/strategies have you tried?  Which worked best/least?
  • Were there additional/unforeseen start up costs?
  • What challenges have you had along the way to setting up business with FDN?  What might you have done differently?
  • What are your thoughts on the current lab testing that FDN recommends, as well as the supplement brands they have relationships with?  
  • Do you find that most of your income from FDN stems from patient sessions or from supplement income?  Some other avenue?

Here’s the outline of this webinar with Dr. Tommy Wood:

[00:03:25] Kalish Institute.

[00:05:54] Robb Wolf.

[00:06:27] Root cause of multiple sclerosis using engineering techniques (paper, talk for the public, talk for physicians).

[00:07:16] Tommy's blog.

[00:07:53] OAT, DUTCH, blood chemistry.

[00:09:09] Chris Kresser's ADAPT course.

[00:10:10] Bryan Walsh's Metabolic Fitness Pro biochemistry course.

[00:10:28] Khan Academy chemistry.

[00:13:31] Mark Sisson's Primal Health Coaching certification.

[00:14:59] Functional Diagnostic Nutrition.

[00:17:53] Coursera Physiology Course form Duke University.

[00:20:01] Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers.

[00:21:34] Jamie Kendall-Weed.

[00:24:06] Paleo Physicians Network.

[00:26:27] Tommy WOULD do it all again the same :)

[00:29:19] "A ticket to play the game"‒Physician's Assistant

[00:33:44] Student debt.

[00:35:35] How to Start a Startup.

[00:36:51] The Elite Performance Program (EPP).

[00:37:09] Ralston Consulting.

[00:37:49] Lisa Fraley, legal coach.

[00:38:08] Client agreements.

[00:39:53] Amelia.

[00:41:16] Jordan Reasoner podcast.

[00:42:33] Practitioner Liberation Project.

[00:43:24] Ben Greenfield podcast with Jamie.

[00:44:47] Zoom, Zendesk, Slack.

[00:45:02] ScheduleOnce.

[00:47:04] Trello.

[00:48:07] Google Drive

[00:48:48] HIPAA compliance.

[00:51:24] Data extraction and model building.

[00:51:45] Python Machine Learning.

[00:52:00] scikit-learn, TensorFlow.

[00:52:52] BioHealth Adrenal Stress Profile (saliva).

[00:53:17] BioHealth 101.

[00:53:53] Mediator Release Test (MRT).

[00:54:53] AIP, Whole30.

[00:55:13] Cyrex Labs.

[00:56:35] Aristo Vojdani.

[00:57:00] Ellen Langer.

[00:58:01] Align Podcast.

[00:58:26] Counterclockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility.

[00:59:10] Ron Rosedale.

[01:00:34] Keto Summit.

[01:01:04] PHAT FIBRE.

[01:03:21] PHAT COW!

[01:03:33] Fruition chocolate.

]]>
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Self-Care and Integrated Movement for the Modern World https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/aaron.alexander.on.2016-09-14.at.12.05.mp3 Aaron Alexander is an accomplished manual therapist and movement coach with over a decade of experience. He is the founder of Align Therapy™, an integrated approach to functional movement and self-care that has helped thousands including Olympic and professional level athletes. He is the creator of the 'Self-Care Kit' and the host of a highly ridiculous and informative podcast.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Aaron Alexander:

[00:00:18] Rolfing Institute.

[00:00:28] Structural alignment.

[00:01:34] Entrepreneurship.

[00:02:10] Align Podcast.

[00:02:41] Dr. Stuart McGill.

[00:02:50] Bike Fit Done Right: Nigel McHolland on my podcast.

[00:02:54] Dr. Ellen Langer.

[00:03:59] David Epstein.

[00:04:33] Prof. Tim Noakes.

[00:04:50] Keto Summit.

[00:05:58] Mindfulness.

[00:08:42] Hormesis.

[00:08:58] Aaron at AHS 16.

[00:09:16] Dr. Grace Liu.

[00:12:53] Amy Cuddy.

[00:15:31] Strongfirst instructor.

[00:16:28] Read to Run: Kelly Starrett on my podcast.

[00:21:44] Futsal.

[00:24:02] Alexander Technique.

[00:29:10] Sitting cross-legged.

[00:30:09] Pomodoro alarm.

[00:30:20] Lotus position.

[00:31:47] Esther Gokhale chair.

[00:37:26] Aaron is looking for a publisher.

[00:40:00] Glidewalking.

[00:41:12] Dr. Mark Cucuzzella barefoot running.

[00:44:28] Aaron's self-care kit.

[00:46:59] Rogue Fitness chinup bar.

[00:47:29] My interview on Aaron's podcast.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/aaron.alexander.on.2016-09-14.at.12.05.mp3 Fri, 07 Oct 2016 13:10:31 GMT Christopher Kelly Aaron Alexander is an accomplished manual therapist and movement coach with over a decade of experience. He is the founder of Align Therapy™, an integrated approach to functional movement and self-care that has helped thousands including Olympic and professional level athletes. He is the creator of the 'Self-Care Kit' and the host of a highly ridiculous and informative podcast.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Aaron Alexander:

[00:00:18] Rolfing Institute.

[00:00:28] Structural alignment.

[00:01:34] Entrepreneurship.

[00:02:10] Align Podcast.

[00:02:41] Dr. Stuart McGill.

[00:02:50] Bike Fit Done Right: Nigel McHolland on my podcast.

[00:02:54] Dr. Ellen Langer.

[00:03:59] David Epstein.

[00:04:33] Prof. Tim Noakes.

[00:04:50] Keto Summit.

[00:05:58] Mindfulness.

[00:08:42] Hormesis.

[00:08:58] Aaron at AHS 16.

[00:09:16] Dr. Grace Liu.

[00:12:53] Amy Cuddy.

[00:15:31] Strongfirst instructor.

[00:16:28] Read to Run: Kelly Starrett on my podcast.

[00:21:44] Futsal.

[00:24:02] Alexander Technique.

[00:29:10] Sitting cross-legged.

[00:30:09] Pomodoro alarm.

[00:30:20] Lotus position.

[00:31:47] Esther Gokhale chair.

[00:37:26] Aaron is looking for a publisher.

[00:40:00] Glidewalking.

[00:41:12] Dr. Mark Cucuzzella barefoot running.

[00:44:28] Aaron's self-care kit.

[00:46:59] Rogue Fitness chinup bar.

[00:47:29] My interview on Aaron's podcast.

]]>
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The Athlete Microbiome Project: The Search for the Golden Microbiome https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Lauren.Petersen.on.2016-09-13.at.09.01.mp3 Lauren Petersen, PhD, is a postdoctoral associate working for Dr. George Weinstock and investigating the microbiome. Our knowledge of the 100 trillion microorganisms that inhabit the human body is still very limited, but the advent of next-generation sequencing technology has allowed researchers to start understanding what kind of microorganisms inhabit the human body and identifying the types of genes these organisms carry. As part of the NIH-funded Human Microbiome Project, her lab is focused on developing and applying the latest technologies to characterize the microbiome and its impact on human health. One of her main projects is metatranscriptomic analysis whereby they are attempting to characterize gene expression of an entire community from human samples such as stool and saliva. Gaining information on what signals or environmental factors can trigger changes in global gene expression of an entire microbial community may provide us with the tools to better treat certain types of diseases in humans.

Lauren is currently working on the Athlete Microbiome Project. By collecting stool and saliva samples from a cohort of highly fit professional cyclists, she will make an attempt to understand how their microbiomes may differ from those of the general population. The goal is to characterize the species present, the genes they carry, and how gene expression is modulated in athletes who push their bodies to the limit.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lauren Petersen:

[00:00:28] George Weinstock, PhD.

[00:01:27] Jeremy Powers interview.

[00:01:43] Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:02:15] Why care about the gut microbiome?

[00:03:32] Metabolic functions.

[00:03:51] NIH Human Microbiome Project.

[00:04:39] Phase II longitudinal study.

[00:06:01] Microbial diversity.

[00:07:33] Lyme and antibiotics.

[00:08:15] Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

[00:09:35] Gordon conferences - Rob Knight.

[00:10:27] American Gut Project.

[00:10:48] Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes.

[00:11:05] Enterobacteriaceae.

[00:11:59] Fecal transplant.

[00:13:16] Screening donors.

[00:13:32] DIY.

[00:13:52] C. diff.

[00:14:14] Transplants started in the 50s.

[00:14:47] IBS.

[00:16:12] Healthy donor.

[00:17:43] Within a month, Lauren was feeling a lot better.

[00:18:13] Instantaneous improvement on the bike.

[00:19:22] No more stomach issues, "more energy than I knew what to do with".

[00:19:54] Retest data showed perfect match with donor.

[00:20:56] Sequencing large vs. small intestinal microbes.

[00:21:28] FDA has no idea what to do.

[00:23:02] Strategies for maintaining a healthy gut microbiome.

[00:23:31] Whole foods, lots of fruit and vegetables.

[00:23:48] No gels.

[00:24:26] Athlete Microbiome Project.

[00:26:34] Microbiome doping?

[00:27:05] Ruminococcus - starch digester.

[00:28:26] Enterotype - the dominate species in the gut.

[00:28:56] Prevotella.

[00:30:14] Teasing apart the cause and the effect.

[00:32:28] Endotoxins released during intense exercise.

[00:32:49] 25 participants at the time of recording, I'm number 26!

[00:33:29] Matching cohort of healthy controls.

[00:34:28] Ibis World Cup racer.

[00:35:01] uBiome.

[00:35:08] My app.

[00:35:54] The problem with 16S sequencing.

[00:36:16] Missing bifidobacteria.

[00:37:05] A combination of methods is required for accurate testing.

[00:38:30] New commercially available test?

[00:39:11] Probiotic quality.

[00:40:04] Testing probiotics.

[00:41:37] Bifido doesn't like oxygen (or your stomach).

[00:42:02] Lactobacillus is more resilient.

[00:42:50] Bifido love fructooligosaccharides.

[00:43:36] Lack of association with dietary restrictions.

[00:44:53] Feed your microbiome!

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Lauren.Petersen.on.2016-09-13.at.09.01.mp3 Thu, 29 Sep 2016 10:09:16 GMT Christopher Kelly Lauren Petersen, PhD, is a postdoctoral associate working for Dr. George Weinstock and investigating the microbiome. Our knowledge of the 100 trillion microorganisms that inhabit the human body is still very limited, but the advent of next-generation sequencing technology has allowed researchers to start understanding what kind of microorganisms inhabit the human body and identifying the types of genes these organisms carry. As part of the NIH-funded Human Microbiome Project, her lab is focused on developing and applying the latest technologies to characterize the microbiome and its impact on human health. One of her main projects is metatranscriptomic analysis whereby they are attempting to characterize gene expression of an entire community from human samples such as stool and saliva. Gaining information on what signals or environmental factors can trigger changes in global gene expression of an entire microbial community may provide us with the tools to better treat certain types of diseases in humans.

Lauren is currently working on the Athlete Microbiome Project. By collecting stool and saliva samples from a cohort of highly fit professional cyclists, she will make an attempt to understand how their microbiomes may differ from those of the general population. The goal is to characterize the species present, the genes they carry, and how gene expression is modulated in athletes who push their bodies to the limit.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Lauren Petersen:

[00:00:28] George Weinstock, PhD.

[00:01:27] Jeremy Powers interview.

[00:01:43] Jeff Kendall-Weed.

[00:02:15] Why care about the gut microbiome?

[00:03:32] Metabolic functions.

[00:03:51] NIH Human Microbiome Project.

[00:04:39] Phase II longitudinal study.

[00:06:01] Microbial diversity.

[00:07:33] Lyme and antibiotics.

[00:08:15] Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

[00:09:35] Gordon conferences - Rob Knight.

[00:10:27] American Gut Project.

[00:10:48] Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes.

[00:11:05] Enterobacteriaceae.

[00:11:59] Fecal transplant.

[00:13:16] Screening donors.

[00:13:32] DIY.

[00:13:52] C. diff.

[00:14:14] Transplants started in the 50s.

[00:14:47] IBS.

[00:16:12] Healthy donor.

[00:17:43] Within a month, Lauren was feeling a lot better.

[00:18:13] Instantaneous improvement on the bike.

[00:19:22] No more stomach issues, "more energy than I knew what to do with".

[00:19:54] Retest data showed perfect match with donor.

[00:20:56] Sequencing large vs. small intestinal microbes.

[00:21:28] FDA has no idea what to do.

[00:23:02] Strategies for maintaining a healthy gut microbiome.

[00:23:31] Whole foods, lots of fruit and vegetables.

[00:23:48] No gels.

[00:24:26] Athlete Microbiome Project.

[00:26:34] Microbiome doping?

[00:27:05] Ruminococcus - starch digester.

[00:28:26] Enterotype - the dominate species in the gut.

[00:28:56] Prevotella.

[00:30:14] Teasing apart the cause and the effect.

[00:32:28] Endotoxins released during intense exercise.

[00:32:49] 25 participants at the time of recording, I'm number 26!

[00:33:29] Matching cohort of healthy controls.

[00:34:28] Ibis World Cup racer.

[00:35:01] uBiome.

[00:35:08] My app.

[00:35:54] The problem with 16S sequencing.

[00:36:16] Missing bifidobacteria.

[00:37:05] A combination of methods is required for accurate testing.

[00:38:30] New commercially available test?

[00:39:11] Probiotic quality.

[00:40:04] Testing probiotics.

[00:41:37] Bifido doesn't like oxygen (or your stomach).

[00:42:02] Lactobacillus is more resilient.

[00:42:50] Bifido love fructooligosaccharides.

[00:43:36] Lack of association with dietary restrictions.

[00:44:53] Feed your microbiome!

]]>
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Don't Miss the Keto Summit https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/keto_summit.mp3 It's really tough to get science-based information about the ketogenic diet - there's so much new research happening all the time, it's hard to keep up!

However, we’ve put together a free online Keto Summit with some world-class doctors, researchers, and athletes who share their latest and best knowledge - how to refine your keto diet, ketone supplements, health benefits of keto, weight loss benefits of keto, and more.

I'm especially excited about the talks by Patrick Arnold, Prof. Tim Noakes, and Dr. Kenneth Ford.

So, don’t miss out as you can watch them all for free during the event! In fact, if you sign up today, you can watch Dominic D'Agostino’s presentation on Neurodegenerative Diseases, Supplements, & Keto Disease Prevention immediately.

Just go here to get your ticket (it starts on Sunday, September 25th).

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/keto_summit.mp3 Sat, 24 Sep 2016 20:09:27 GMT Christopher Kelly It's really tough to get science-based information about the ketogenic diet - there's so much new research happening all the time, it's hard to keep up!

However, we’ve put together a free online Keto Summit with some world-class doctors, researchers, and athletes who share their latest and best knowledge - how to refine your keto diet, ketone supplements, health benefits of keto, weight loss benefits of keto, and more.

I'm especially excited about the talks by Patrick Arnold, Prof. Tim Noakes, and Dr. Kenneth Ford.

So, don’t miss out as you can watch them all for free during the event! In fact, if you sign up today, you can watch Dominic D'Agostino’s presentation on Neurodegenerative Diseases, Supplements, & Keto Disease Prevention immediately.

Just go here to get your ticket (it starts on Sunday, September 25th).

]]>
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Love People and Use Things (Because the Opposite Never Works) https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Joshua.Fields.Millburn.on.2016-09-09.at.13.05.mp3 Joshua Fields Millburn is one half of The Minimalists.

At first glance, people might think the point of minimalism is only to get rid of material possessions: Eliminating. Jettisoning. Extracting. Detaching. Decluttering. Paring down. Letting go. But that’s a mistake. 

Minimalists don’t focus on having less, less, less; rather, they focus on making room for more: more time, more passion, more experiences, more growth, more contribution, more contentment. More freedom. Clearing the clutter from life’s path helps us make that room.

Minimalism is the thing that gets us past the things so we can make room for life’s important things—which actually aren’t things at all.

Joshua wasn’t always a minimalist. In late 2009, his mother died and marriage ended (in the same month), and Joshua started questioning everything. That’s when he discovered minimalism. Now, Joshua thinks he owns fewer than 288 things (but he doesn’t actually count his stuff).

Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things examines the many flavors of minimalism by taking the audience inside the lives of minimalists from all walks of life—families, entrepreneurs, architects, artists, journalists, scientists, and even a former Wall Street broker—all of whom are striving to live a meaningful life with less.

Check out the books, “Let go, change your life TEDxFargo talk” and new The Minimalists Podcast, where they discuss living a meaningful life with less stuff and answer questions from their listeners.

In the show I mentioned Colin Wright’s Exile Lifestyle blog and Derek Sivers on Tim Ferriss’s podcast.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Joshua.Fields.Millburn.on.2016-09-09.at.13.05.mp3 Thu, 22 Sep 2016 19:09:25 GMT Christopher Kelly Joshua Fields Millburn is one half of The Minimalists.

At first glance, people might think the point of minimalism is only to get rid of material possessions: Eliminating. Jettisoning. Extracting. Detaching. Decluttering. Paring down. Letting go. But that’s a mistake. 

Minimalists don’t focus on having less, less, less; rather, they focus on making room for more: more time, more passion, more experiences, more growth, more contribution, more contentment. More freedom. Clearing the clutter from life’s path helps us make that room.

Minimalism is the thing that gets us past the things so we can make room for life’s important things—which actually aren’t things at all.

Joshua wasn’t always a minimalist. In late 2009, his mother died and marriage ended (in the same month), and Joshua started questioning everything. That’s when he discovered minimalism. Now, Joshua thinks he owns fewer than 288 things (but he doesn’t actually count his stuff).

Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things examines the many flavors of minimalism by taking the audience inside the lives of minimalists from all walks of life—families, entrepreneurs, architects, artists, journalists, scientists, and even a former Wall Street broker—all of whom are striving to live a meaningful life with less.

Check out the books, “Let go, change your life TEDxFargo talk” and new The Minimalists Podcast, where they discuss living a meaningful life with less stuff and answer questions from their listeners.

In the show I mentioned Colin Wright’s Exile Lifestyle blog and Derek Sivers on Tim Ferriss’s podcast.

]]>
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GMOs: The State of the Science https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Leandra.Brettner.on.2016-09-06.at.11.mp3 Any discussion of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is fraught with difficulty, not least of which is the definition. The Non GMO Project describes them as “organisms whose genetic material has been artificially manipulated in a laboratory through genetic engineering,” but there are others, see Leandra’s AHS 16 poster for more details.          

Leandra Brettner is a PhD candidate at the University of Washington department of bioengineering, and in this interview we discuss artificial selection, DNA delivery methods, integration and mutation breeding together with their safety concerns.

One might argue that GM is a technique, and that each application should be tested for safety. In this interview I argue to Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s point that GMOs fall into a special class of problem where the potential harm is systemic (rather than localised) and the consequences can involve total irreversible ruin, such as the extinction of human beings or all life on the planet.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Leandra Brettner:

0:04:34    Legislation S. 764.

0:08:30    Sequence-specific nucleases.

0:08:49    I went looking for a Khan video on CRISPR Cas9, and found this terrifying TED talk.

0:09:22    Homologous recombination.

0:14:02    Mutation breeding.

0:16:36    Monsanto Buys Seminis (2005).

0:18:41    Leandra misspoke when she said Monsanto owned the BRCA1/2 gene, it was Myriad Genetics.

0:33:32    Bacteriophage.

0:35:54    Evolutionary computation.

0:38:44    The effect of glyphosate on potential pathogens and beneficial members of poultry microbiota in vitro.

0:40:37    An overview of the last 10 years of genetically engineered crop safety research.

0:43:53    The Precautionary Principle (with Application to the Genetic Modification of Organisms).

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Leandra.Brettner.on.2016-09-06.at.11.mp3 Thu, 15 Sep 2016 19:09:09 GMT Christopher Kelly Any discussion of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is fraught with difficulty, not least of which is the definition. The Non GMO Project describes them as “organisms whose genetic material has been artificially manipulated in a laboratory through genetic engineering,” but there are others, see Leandra’s AHS 16 poster for more details.          

Leandra Brettner is a PhD candidate at the University of Washington department of bioengineering, and in this interview we discuss artificial selection, DNA delivery methods, integration and mutation breeding together with their safety concerns.

One might argue that GM is a technique, and that each application should be tested for safety. In this interview I argue to Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s point that GMOs fall into a special class of problem where the potential harm is systemic (rather than localised) and the consequences can involve total irreversible ruin, such as the extinction of human beings or all life on the planet.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Leandra Brettner:

0:04:34    Legislation S. 764.

0:08:30    Sequence-specific nucleases.

0:08:49    I went looking for a Khan video on CRISPR Cas9, and found this terrifying TED talk.

0:09:22    Homologous recombination.

0:14:02    Mutation breeding.

0:16:36    Monsanto Buys Seminis (2005).

0:18:41    Leandra misspoke when she said Monsanto owned the BRCA1/2 gene, it was Myriad Genetics.

0:33:32    Bacteriophage.

0:35:54    Evolutionary computation.

0:38:44    The effect of glyphosate on potential pathogens and beneficial members of poultry microbiota in vitro.

0:40:37    An overview of the last 10 years of genetically engineered crop safety research.

0:43:53    The Precautionary Principle (with Application to the Genetic Modification of Organisms).

]]>
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Surviving in a Toxic World: Nonmetal Toxic Chemicals and Their Effects on Health https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/williamsha1.on.2016-08-30.at.07.mp3 This podcast is the second part of a series. In the first part, Dr. Shaw and I talked about how to measure metabolism using organic acids. My initial test showed two major problems: yeast and clostridia overgrowth. It’s been about six months since I took probiotics and Raintree Formulas Amazon antifungals for two months and the retest shows some but not complete improvement.

The primary focus of this interview is the new Great Plains test for organic (nonmetal) environmental toxicity, something that I think may be a problem for the people that work with us. I won’t know for sure until we collect some more data, as always I like to test myself before recommending others do the same, and my result turned out to be “one of the cleanest Dr. Shaw has ever seen.” The possible exception is a mild elevation of 2-Hydroxyisobutyric and other metabolites that indicate exposure to petrochemicals I suspect from riding my bike on the road.

Download my full result

About my guest

William Shaw, Ph.D., is board certified in the fields of clinical chemistry and toxicology by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry. Before he founded The Great Plains Laboratory, Inc., he worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Order an organic acids test with nonmetal chemicals profile

Use the discount code TOX for $150 off.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr William Shaw, Ph.D.

0:00:18    Previous interview.

0:03:25    HPHPA (3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropionic acid).

0:03:55    D-Lactate free probiotic.

0:04:37    Vancomycin or Metronidazole.

0:05:03    Results, markers 33 and 34.

0:07:00    Arabinose.

0:07:24    Amazon A-F.

0:10:34    The Role of Oxalates in Autism and Chronic Disorders.

0:13:19    How to Protect Your Family from Environmental Toxicity with Dr. Julie Walsh on the Paleo Baby podcast.

0:13:37    AHS16 - Tim Gerstmar - Obesogens and Endocrine Disruptors.

0:16:44    Succinic dehydrogenase.

0:18:20    Tiglylglycine.

0:19:04    Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

0:20:40    2-Hydroxyisobutyric Acid, MTBE and ETBE.

0:43:12    Sauna + niacin flush.

0:50:18    discount code TOX.

0:57:54    GPL webinar archive.

0:58:08    GPL University upcoming events.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/williamsha1.on.2016-08-30.at.07.mp3 Thu, 08 Sep 2016 13:09:14 GMT Christopher Kelly This podcast is the second part of a series. In the first part, Dr. Shaw and I talked about how to measure metabolism using organic acids. My initial test showed two major problems: yeast and clostridia overgrowth. It’s been about six months since I took probiotics and Raintree Formulas Amazon antifungals for two months and the retest shows some but not complete improvement.

The primary focus of this interview is the new Great Plains test for organic (nonmetal) environmental toxicity, something that I think may be a problem for the people that work with us. I won’t know for sure until we collect some more data, as always I like to test myself before recommending others do the same, and my result turned out to be “one of the cleanest Dr. Shaw has ever seen.” The possible exception is a mild elevation of 2-Hydroxyisobutyric and other metabolites that indicate exposure to petrochemicals I suspect from riding my bike on the road.

Download my full result

About my guest

William Shaw, Ph.D., is board certified in the fields of clinical chemistry and toxicology by the American Board of Clinical Chemistry. Before he founded The Great Plains Laboratory, Inc., he worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Order an organic acids test with nonmetal chemicals profile

Use the discount code TOX for $150 off.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr William Shaw, Ph.D.

0:00:18    Previous interview.

0:03:25    HPHPA (3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxypropionic acid).

0:03:55    D-Lactate free probiotic.

0:04:37    Vancomycin or Metronidazole.

0:05:03    Results, markers 33 and 34.

0:07:00    Arabinose.

0:07:24    Amazon A-F.

0:10:34    The Role of Oxalates in Autism and Chronic Disorders.

0:13:19    How to Protect Your Family from Environmental Toxicity with Dr. Julie Walsh on the Paleo Baby podcast.

0:13:37    AHS16 - Tim Gerstmar - Obesogens and Endocrine Disruptors.

0:16:44    Succinic dehydrogenase.

0:18:20    Tiglylglycine.

0:19:04    Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

0:20:40    2-Hydroxyisobutyric Acid, MTBE and ETBE.

0:43:12    Sauna + niacin flush.

0:50:18    discount code TOX.

0:57:54    GPL webinar archive.

0:58:08    GPL University upcoming events.

]]>
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How to Conquer Anxiety with Tim JP Collins https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Collins.on.2016-08-16.at.07.mp3 Tim JP Collins is a British entrepreneur and host of The Anxiety Podcast. In a former life as an executive, Tim reached a tipping point onstage during a big presentation and has since turned his life around to overcome his anxiety and is now helping other people do the same.

Looking back Tim realised that he’d created the perfect storm:

  • Lots of travel away from home and family.
  • Drinking alcohol in excess and too often.
  • Staying up late and then waking up with gallons of coffee.
  • Years of bodily abuse with bad food & not enough exercise.
  • Working in a job that created no meaning.

During this interview, you’ll find out how Tim conquered his anxiety.

Tim mentioned:

I mentioned:

Part two of this conversation is on Tim’s podcast, where I talk about the connection between chronic inflammation and anxiety, and how some of the changes Tim made may have been measurable in blood:

Anxiety disorders and inflammation in a large adult cohort

  • Inflammatory markers included C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-a.
  • Elevated levels of CRP were found in men, but not in women.
    • Interleukin 6 is secreted by T cells and macrophages to stimulate immune response, e.g. during infection and after trauma.
    • (TNF)-a is a cell signaling protein (cytokine) involved in systemic inflammation and is one of the cytokines that make up the acute phase reaction. It is produced chiefly by activated macrophages, although it can be produced by many other cell types such as CD4+ lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and neurons.
  • Immune dysregulation is especially found in persons with a late-onset anxiety disorder.
  • Increasing evidence links anxiety to cardiovascular risk factors and diseases such as atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and coronary heart disease.
  • Chronic stress may initiate changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and the immune system, which in turn can trigger depression as well as anxiety.
]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tim.Collins.on.2016-08-16.at.07.mp3 Fri, 02 Sep 2016 12:09:56 GMT Christopher Kelly Tim JP Collins is a British entrepreneur and host of The Anxiety Podcast. In a former life as an executive, Tim reached a tipping point onstage during a big presentation and has since turned his life around to overcome his anxiety and is now helping other people do the same.

Looking back Tim realised that he’d created the perfect storm:

  • Lots of travel away from home and family.
  • Drinking alcohol in excess and too often.
  • Staying up late and then waking up with gallons of coffee.
  • Years of bodily abuse with bad food & not enough exercise.
  • Working in a job that created no meaning.

During this interview, you’ll find out how Tim conquered his anxiety.

Tim mentioned:

I mentioned:

Part two of this conversation is on Tim’s podcast, where I talk about the connection between chronic inflammation and anxiety, and how some of the changes Tim made may have been measurable in blood:

Anxiety disorders and inflammation in a large adult cohort

  • Inflammatory markers included C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-a.
  • Elevated levels of CRP were found in men, but not in women.
    • Interleukin 6 is secreted by T cells and macrophages to stimulate immune response, e.g. during infection and after trauma.
    • (TNF)-a is a cell signaling protein (cytokine) involved in systemic inflammation and is one of the cytokines that make up the acute phase reaction. It is produced chiefly by activated macrophages, although it can be produced by many other cell types such as CD4+ lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and neurons.
  • Immune dysregulation is especially found in persons with a late-onset anxiety disorder.
  • Increasing evidence links anxiety to cardiovascular risk factors and diseases such as atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and coronary heart disease.
  • Chronic stress may initiate changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and the immune system, which in turn can trigger depression as well as anxiety.
]]>
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How to Recognise Good Chocolate (and Why You Should Care) https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/torea_chocolate_Aug16.mp3

I will send the first 100 people that leave me a 5-star review on iTunes (video instructions) a bar of Fruition 100% dark chocolate. Please send your US shipping address to support@nourishbalancethrive.com

Chocolate is awesome! Everyone knows that. Less well known is cacao’s (we use the terms chocolate, cocoa, and cacao synonymously in this podcast) blood pressure lowering and insulin signalling effects. The interest in the effect of cacoa on blood pressure started with the discovery that an island population of Kuna Indians suffered much lower incidence of hypertension and age-related rise of blood pressure. The people that returned to the mainland enjoyed no such benefit, even after correcting for salt intake. Island-dwelling Kuna Indians consume about 3-4 cups of cacoa drinks on average per day, while the mainland-dwelling Kuna Indians consume up to 10 times less cocoa.

Christopher Columbus in 1502

Explorers like Columbus brought cacoa to Europe but people didn't like the drink without it first being sweetened. Subsequent roasting (up to 120 °C), mixing (conching), alkalising (dutching), adding sugar, milk, vanilla and lecithin emulsifiers make chocolate as we know it today. Unfortunately, much of this processing removes the flavanols that are the compound of interest.

Flavanols are also found in other plant-derived produce, including beans, apricots, blackberries, apples and tea leaves, but in a lower concentration than in cacoa.

More trouble for chocolate

As with many crops grown in third-world countries, there are ethical concerns, especially child labour. “Bean to bar” chocolate may be nothing of sort, and some manufacturers may be in the remelting and wallpaper business.

Know what you’re buying!

As with most things in life, you pay for what you get, and the very best is not available in your local supermarket. That’s why you should listen to this podcast and consider joining a buyer’s club like the Chocolate Garage.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Toréa Rodriguez, FDN-P:

0:00:30    Toréa has been on my podcast twice before [1, 2].

0:02:56    The Functional Diagnostic Nutrition certification program.

0:03:05    Fabian Popa interview.

0:03:57    Jeremy Powers interview.

0:05:33    torearodriguez.com

0:06:30    Video instructions for leaving me a review on iTunes.

0:07:25    Buy Fruition 100% dark chocolate direct from me.

0:09:22    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Effect of cocoa on blood pressure.

0:10:08    Cocoa, Glucose Tolerance, and Insulin Signaling: Cardiometabolic Protection.

0:11:37    Khan Academy video: Enzyme Linked Receptors.

0:15:32    A randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover showed for the first time that the intake of just 10 g of cocoa with a very low caloric (38 kcal) and flavonol (80 mg) content per day was already significantly ameliorating arterial function in healthy subjects.

0:18:15    PHAT FIBRE MCT oil powder.

0:21:59    Cyrex Array #4 Gluten-Associated Cross-Reactive Foods and Foods Sensitivity.

0:30:58    The Meadow and Cacao in Portland.

0:32:31    Sunita De Tourreil from the Chocolate Garage.

0:33:27    Mutari Chocolate.

0:33:59    Francois Pralus Chocolate.

0:34:27    Domori Chocolate.

0:34:31    Grenada Chocolate.

0:35:01    Marou Chocolate.

0:36:35    Dick Taylor Chocolate.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/torea_chocolate_Aug16.mp3 Mon, 29 Aug 2016 09:08:49 GMT Christopher Kelly

I will send the first 100 people that leave me a 5-star review on iTunes (video instructions) a bar of Fruition 100% dark chocolate. Please send your US shipping address to support@nourishbalancethrive.com

Chocolate is awesome! Everyone knows that. Less well known is cacao’s (we use the terms chocolate, cocoa, and cacao synonymously in this podcast) blood pressure lowering and insulin signalling effects. The interest in the effect of cacoa on blood pressure started with the discovery that an island population of Kuna Indians suffered much lower incidence of hypertension and age-related rise of blood pressure. The people that returned to the mainland enjoyed no such benefit, even after correcting for salt intake. Island-dwelling Kuna Indians consume about 3-4 cups of cacoa drinks on average per day, while the mainland-dwelling Kuna Indians consume up to 10 times less cocoa.

Christopher Columbus in 1502

Explorers like Columbus brought cacoa to Europe but people didn't like the drink without it first being sweetened. Subsequent roasting (up to 120 °C), mixing (conching), alkalising (dutching), adding sugar, milk, vanilla and lecithin emulsifiers make chocolate as we know it today. Unfortunately, much of this processing removes the flavanols that are the compound of interest.

Flavanols are also found in other plant-derived produce, including beans, apricots, blackberries, apples and tea leaves, but in a lower concentration than in cacoa.

More trouble for chocolate

As with many crops grown in third-world countries, there are ethical concerns, especially child labour. “Bean to bar” chocolate may be nothing of sort, and some manufacturers may be in the remelting and wallpaper business.

Know what you’re buying!

As with most things in life, you pay for what you get, and the very best is not available in your local supermarket. That’s why you should listen to this podcast and consider joining a buyer’s club like the Chocolate Garage.

Here’s the outline of this podcast with Toréa Rodriguez, FDN-P:

0:00:30    Toréa has been on my podcast twice before [1, 2].

0:02:56    The Functional Diagnostic Nutrition certification program.

0:03:05    Fabian Popa interview.

0:03:57    Jeremy Powers interview.

0:05:33    torearodriguez.com

0:06:30    Video instructions for leaving me a review on iTunes.

0:07:25    Buy Fruition 100% dark chocolate direct from me.

0:09:22    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Effect of cocoa on blood pressure.

0:10:08    Cocoa, Glucose Tolerance, and Insulin Signaling: Cardiometabolic Protection.

0:11:37    Khan Academy video: Enzyme Linked Receptors.

0:15:32    A randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover showed for the first time that the intake of just 10 g of cocoa with a very low caloric (38 kcal) and flavonol (80 mg) content per day was already significantly ameliorating arterial function in healthy subjects.

0:18:15    PHAT FIBRE MCT oil powder.

0:21:59    Cyrex Array #4 Gluten-Associated Cross-Reactive Foods and Foods Sensitivity.

0:30:58    The Meadow and Cacao in Portland.

0:32:31    Sunita De Tourreil from the Chocolate Garage.

0:33:27    Mutari Chocolate.

0:33:59    Francois Pralus Chocolate.

0:34:27    Domori Chocolate.

0:34:31    Grenada Chocolate.

0:35:01    Marou Chocolate.

0:36:35    Dick Taylor Chocolate.

]]>
clean
Male ED: The Canary in the Coal Mine https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-08-16.at.13.mp3 The overall prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men aged ≥20 years was 18.4% suggesting that erectile dysfunction affects 18 million men in the US alone. Among men with diabetes, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 51.3%. ED can have a neurogenic, psychogenic, or endocrinologic basis, but the most common cause is thought to be related to vascular abnormalities of the penile blood supply and erectile tissue often associated with cardiovascular disease and its risk factors.

Listen to this podcast to find out about the prevalence of, and solutions for, erectile dysfunction.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-08-16.at.13.mp3 Tue, 23 Aug 2016 13:08:17 GMT Christopher Kelly The overall prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men aged ≥20 years was 18.4% suggesting that erectile dysfunction affects 18 million men in the US alone. Among men with diabetes, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 51.3%. ED can have a neurogenic, psychogenic, or endocrinologic basis, but the most common cause is thought to be related to vascular abnormalities of the penile blood supply and erectile tissue often associated with cardiovascular disease and its risk factors.

Listen to this podcast to find out about the prevalence of, and solutions for, erectile dysfunction.

]]>
yes
National Cyclocross Champion Jeremy Powers on Racing, Training and the Ketogenic Diet https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jeremy.Powers.on.2016-08-03.at.11.mp3 Jeremy Powers is the current U.S. Cyclocross champion and top-ranked American rider in the world, and he listens to my podcast! I couldn’t believe it when I found out. Jeremy emailed me to say hi, and of course, I immediately invited him on so that I could probe deep into the diet, lifestyle, training and racing strategy that has enabled him to be National Champion four times. Our contact was minimal before the interview, and I had no idea that Jeremy has a delicate relationship with carbohydrates, or that he has experimented with the ketogenic diet.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jeremy Powers:

0:04:02    Infectious mononucleosis (mono).

0:04:31    Northampton Cycling Club Elite Team

0:04:37    Alec Donahue and Mukunda Feldman.

0:05:48    Danny from Jelly Belly cycling team.

0:06:26    Philadelphia International Cycling Classic.

0:07:25    Kirk Albers.

0:08:54    Cross is 30-40 race days per year.

0:08:59    Road is an additional 70-80.

0:11:27    Tubular tyres.

0:11:30    SRAM eTAP wireless shifting, hydraulic brakes and 1X system with clutch derailleurs.

0:17:46    "Just go out there and flap your wings."

0:18:45    “Blackboard technique where I think about absolutely nothing”

0:22:18    Behind the Barriers documentary series.

0:26:28    Very low blood sugar: 40 mg/dL!

0:29:40    Workup at the Mayo Clinic included the blood marker C-peptide.

0:32:12    CHO intake of around 200g on a day included four hours of training.

0:32:48    Cross season is Sep - Feb.

0:32:55    Five week rest break in Feb.

0:33:11    Training 25-30 hours a week.

0:33:36    6-8 weeks of base.

0:36:53    Core, plank, side-plank.

0:37:36    3x12 15-25lb Bulgarian split-squat.

0:38:13    CrossFit style box jumps.

0:45:43    After Chris Froome cut back on carbs for more protein, he lost 20 pounds, started winning the Tour de France, and became a millionaire.

0:45:46    2016 Tour de France second place finisher Romain Bardet.

0:45:52    Breakfast of Champions article by Marty Kendall.

0:47:31    MCT oil. We make a powdered version.

0:51:24    Review: Ketone Bodies and Exercise Performance: The Next Magic Bullet or Merely Hype?

0:51:40    Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes.

0:55:04    Focus bikes.

0:57:18    Cyclocross camp in August with FasCat Coaching.

0:57:42    Ember: The World's First Non-invasive Haemoglobin Tracker.

0:59:28    Ferritin blood test.

0:59:55    Very low 25-OH-D.

1:01:05    The Daily Lipid Podcast 9: Balancing Calcium and Phosphorus in the Diet, and the Importance of Measuring Parathyroid Hormone (PTH).

1:05:18    JAM Fund Cycling.

1:07:41    Ellen Noble.

1:10:07    www.jpows.com

1:10:14    behindthebarriers.tv
]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jeremy.Powers.on.2016-08-03.at.11.mp3 Tue, 09 Aug 2016 09:08:24 GMT Christopher Kelly Jeremy Powers is the current U.S. Cyclocross champion and top-ranked American rider in the world, and he listens to my podcast! I couldn’t believe it when I found out. Jeremy emailed me to say hi, and of course, I immediately invited him on so that I could probe deep into the diet, lifestyle, training and racing strategy that has enabled him to be National Champion four times. Our contact was minimal before the interview, and I had no idea that Jeremy has a delicate relationship with carbohydrates, or that he has experimented with the ketogenic diet.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jeremy Powers:

0:04:02    Infectious mononucleosis (mono).

0:04:31    Northampton Cycling Club Elite Team

0:04:37    Alec Donahue and Mukunda Feldman.

0:05:48    Danny from Jelly Belly cycling team.

0:06:26    Philadelphia International Cycling Classic.

0:07:25    Kirk Albers.

0:08:54    Cross is 30-40 race days per year.

0:08:59    Road is an additional 70-80.

0:11:27    Tubular tyres.

0:11:30    SRAM eTAP wireless shifting, hydraulic brakes and 1X system with clutch derailleurs.

0:17:46    "Just go out there and flap your wings."

0:18:45    “Blackboard technique where I think about absolutely nothing”

0:22:18    Behind the Barriers documentary series.

0:26:28    Very low blood sugar: 40 mg/dL!

0:29:40    Workup at the Mayo Clinic included the blood marker C-peptide.

0:32:12    CHO intake of around 200g on a day included four hours of training.

0:32:48    Cross season is Sep - Feb.

0:32:55    Five week rest break in Feb.

0:33:11    Training 25-30 hours a week.

0:33:36    6-8 weeks of base.

0:36:53    Core, plank, side-plank.

0:37:36    3x12 15-25lb Bulgarian split-squat.

0:38:13    CrossFit style box jumps.

0:45:43    After Chris Froome cut back on carbs for more protein, he lost 20 pounds, started winning the Tour de France, and became a millionaire.

0:45:46    2016 Tour de France second place finisher Romain Bardet.

0:45:52    Breakfast of Champions article by Marty Kendall.

0:47:31    MCT oil. We make a powdered version.

0:51:24    Review: Ketone Bodies and Exercise Performance: The Next Magic Bullet or Merely Hype?

0:51:40    Nutritional Ketosis Alters Fuel Preference and Thereby Endurance Performance in Athletes.

0:55:04    Focus bikes.

0:57:18    Cyclocross camp in August with FasCat Coaching.

0:57:42    Ember: The World's First Non-invasive Haemoglobin Tracker.

0:59:28    Ferritin blood test.

0:59:55    Very low 25-OH-D.

1:01:05    The Daily Lipid Podcast 9: Balancing Calcium and Phosphorus in the Diet, and the Importance of Measuring Parathyroid Hormone (PTH).

1:05:18    JAM Fund Cycling.

1:07:41    Ellen Noble.

1:10:07    www.jpows.com

1:10:14    behindthebarriers.tv
]]>
clean
Recovering from Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics Injury https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Fabian.Popa.on.2016-07-26.at.07.mp3 In January 2014, young and talented Romanian engineer Fabian Popa was feeling fine when pneumonia struck from nowhere. He remembers coming home from work and feeling a burning sensation in his chest. After a short time coping with the coughing, severe fatigue set in and Fabian found himself unable to work.

Having heard about the potential for unwanted effects caused by antibiotics, Fabian held out hoping the coughing would subside. After ten days he relented, and upon listening to his lungs, the doctor said: “Well, you have pneumonia. Take this antibiotic.” And that’s what he did.

Fabian took Bayer brand Avelox, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. In the United States, similar drugs Ciprofloxacin ("Cipro") and Levofloxacin are more commonly prescribed. Everything was fine for a month, but then things started to go wrong in mysterious ways. The biggest signs that something was wrong were neurological in nature, and he experienced muscle weakness and twitching. Chronic diarrhoea set in and Fabian began to gain weight.

After exhausting his options in Romania, Fabian moved on to to Germany where he eventually got a diagnosis of an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

In this interview, Fabian speaks candidly about his recovery from "iatrogenic" injury. Iatrogenesis (from the Greek for "brought forth by the healer"), doesn't necessarily imply an error, but rather an unintended outcome. Had he not taken the medicine, Fabian might not have been here to talk about his recovery. But still, the unwanted effects of the antibiotics were severe.

Fabian's story of recovery is incomplete but still inspiring. As an engineer, he applied his analytical and problem solving skills to blood chemistry, urinary organic acids, and stool culturomics to design a solution that consisted of diet and lifestyle modification and nutritional supplements. At the end of this interview, I asked Fabian: "Let me just check, you are feeling better than before aren’t you?" to which he replied: "Yes, of course [...] Maybe next time we talk, I can report that there’s autoimmune no more."

Here’s the outline of this interview with Fabian Popa:

0:05:07    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

0:07:47    Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

0:18:43    Dr. Grace Liu, PharmD.

0:18:46    Dr. Tommy Wood, MD is the CMO at Nourish Balance Thrive.

0:19:33    Haptoglobin.

0:22:32    Diamine oxidase is one of the two enzymes that break down histamine, the other being Histamine N-methyltransferase.

0:23:06    Complement component 3 blood test.

0:23:59    Tumor necrosis factor alpha blood test.

0:25:37    Fabian used the autoimmune Paleo diet, my favourite guide is called A Simple Guide to the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol.

0:29:58    The Marshall Protocol (please don’t do this!)

0:30:48    Tim Ferriss podcast.

0:33:58    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) at the Taymount clinic.

0:37:03    Justin Sonnenburg presentation at the UCSF Paleo Symposium.

0:37:04    Diet-induced extinctions in the gut microbiota compound over generations.

0:38:54    Stool culturomics can be superior to metagenomics [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

0:39:46    uBiome and my report tool.

0:40:32    Iatrogenic injury.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Fabian.Popa.on.2016-07-26.at.07.mp3 Wed, 03 Aug 2016 19:08:27 GMT Christopher Kelly In January 2014, young and talented Romanian engineer Fabian Popa was feeling fine when pneumonia struck from nowhere. He remembers coming home from work and feeling a burning sensation in his chest. After a short time coping with the coughing, severe fatigue set in and Fabian found himself unable to work.

Having heard about the potential for unwanted effects caused by antibiotics, Fabian held out hoping the coughing would subside. After ten days he relented, and upon listening to his lungs, the doctor said: “Well, you have pneumonia. Take this antibiotic.” And that’s what he did.

Fabian took Bayer brand Avelox, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic. In the United States, similar drugs Ciprofloxacin ("Cipro") and Levofloxacin are more commonly prescribed. Everything was fine for a month, but then things started to go wrong in mysterious ways. The biggest signs that something was wrong were neurological in nature, and he experienced muscle weakness and twitching. Chronic diarrhoea set in and Fabian began to gain weight.

After exhausting his options in Romania, Fabian moved on to to Germany where he eventually got a diagnosis of an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

In this interview, Fabian speaks candidly about his recovery from "iatrogenic" injury. Iatrogenesis (from the Greek for "brought forth by the healer"), doesn't necessarily imply an error, but rather an unintended outcome. Had he not taken the medicine, Fabian might not have been here to talk about his recovery. But still, the unwanted effects of the antibiotics were severe.

Fabian's story of recovery is incomplete but still inspiring. As an engineer, he applied his analytical and problem solving skills to blood chemistry, urinary organic acids, and stool culturomics to design a solution that consisted of diet and lifestyle modification and nutritional supplements. At the end of this interview, I asked Fabian: "Let me just check, you are feeling better than before aren’t you?" to which he replied: "Yes, of course [...] Maybe next time we talk, I can report that there’s autoimmune no more."

Here’s the outline of this interview with Fabian Popa:

0:05:07    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

0:07:47    Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

0:18:43    Dr. Grace Liu, PharmD.

0:18:46    Dr. Tommy Wood, MD is the CMO at Nourish Balance Thrive.

0:19:33    Haptoglobin.

0:22:32    Diamine oxidase is one of the two enzymes that break down histamine, the other being Histamine N-methyltransferase.

0:23:06    Complement component 3 blood test.

0:23:59    Tumor necrosis factor alpha blood test.

0:25:37    Fabian used the autoimmune Paleo diet, my favourite guide is called A Simple Guide to the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol.

0:29:58    The Marshall Protocol (please don’t do this!)

0:30:48    Tim Ferriss podcast.

0:33:58    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) at the Taymount clinic.

0:37:03    Justin Sonnenburg presentation at the UCSF Paleo Symposium.

0:37:04    Diet-induced extinctions in the gut microbiota compound over generations.

0:38:54    Stool culturomics can be superior to metagenomics [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

0:39:46    uBiome and my report tool.

0:40:32    Iatrogenic injury.

]]>
clean
18 Hours of Mountain Bike Racing on Zero Calories https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/bc_bike_race_2016_recap.mp3 Fast facts:
  • The elimination diets that we’ve gotten great results with for our clients travel very well with a little planning.

  • Our diet didn’t vary from the norm on a recent three week road trip.

  • I’ve been eating a very high fat and fibre, moderate protein, zero acellular carbohydrate (e.g. sugar) ketogenic diet.

  • Just before we departed, my blood glucose was 77 mg/dL and blood beta-hydroxybutyrate was 1.4 mmol/L.

  • I placed 29/600 in the BC Bike Race, a 7-day race in a very wet British Columbia.

  • In over 18 hours of racing, I consumed zero calories and a total of 2L of plain water whilst on the bike.

Here’s the outline of this podcast:

0:05:06    Julie's videos: Food prep for the BC BIke Race, Truck Stop Gourmet, and How to Shop at an Unfamiliar Market.

0:05:33    Instant Pot pressure cooker.

0:05:41    FoodSaver Vacuum Sealing System.

0:09:41    Glass Mason Jars.

0:11:37    Cultured Caveman restaurant in Portland.

0:11:45    Mission Heirloom (podcast).

0:14:18    Wild Planet Wild Sardines in Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

0:14:49    Artisana Organic Raw Coconut Butter.

0:15:10    US Wellness Meats. I particularly enjoy their liverwurst, braunschweiger, head cheese, pemmican and pork rinds.

0:16:07    Epic All Natural Meat Bar, 100% Wild, Boar With Uncured Bacon.

0:16:22    LunchBots stainless snack box.

0:16:47    SeaSnax Roasted Seaweed.

0:19:38    James Wilson (podcast).

0:24:58    KetoCaNa (podcast).

0:25:04    UCAN Superstarch (podcast).

0:27:12    Gastrointestinal Complaints During Exercise: Prevalence, Etiology, and Nutritional Recommendations.

0:28:52    Carrying two copies of a somewhat common allele of the FMO3 gene, defined as E308G and E258K, has been reported to lead to mild trimethylaminuria.

0:40:33    PHAT FIBRE.

0:42:56    Catabolic Blocker (podcast).

0:43:27    PharmaNAC (podcast).

0:44:03    Podcast: Should You Supplement with Antioxidants?

0:45:05    Meriva and EnteroMend (podcast).

0:50:29    BIOHACKER SUMMIT UK with Pando.

0:51:12    Creatine (article).

0:52:05    NiaCel (nicotinamide riboside) (podcast).

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/bc_bike_race_2016_recap.mp3 Sun, 24 Jul 2016 16:07:32 GMT Christopher Kelly Fast facts:
  • The elimination diets that we’ve gotten great results with for our clients travel very well with a little planning.

  • Our diet didn’t vary from the norm on a recent three week road trip.

  • I’ve been eating a very high fat and fibre, moderate protein, zero acellular carbohydrate (e.g. sugar) ketogenic diet.

  • Just before we departed, my blood glucose was 77 mg/dL and blood beta-hydroxybutyrate was 1.4 mmol/L.

  • I placed 29/600 in the BC Bike Race, a 7-day race in a very wet British Columbia.

  • In over 18 hours of racing, I consumed zero calories and a total of 2L of plain water whilst on the bike.

Here’s the outline of this podcast:

0:05:06    Julie's videos: Food prep for the BC BIke Race, Truck Stop Gourmet, and How to Shop at an Unfamiliar Market.

0:05:33    Instant Pot pressure cooker.

0:05:41    FoodSaver Vacuum Sealing System.

0:09:41    Glass Mason Jars.

0:11:37    Cultured Caveman restaurant in Portland.

0:11:45    Mission Heirloom (podcast).

0:14:18    Wild Planet Wild Sardines in Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

0:14:49    Artisana Organic Raw Coconut Butter.

0:15:10    US Wellness Meats. I particularly enjoy their liverwurst, braunschweiger, head cheese, pemmican and pork rinds.

0:16:07    Epic All Natural Meat Bar, 100% Wild, Boar With Uncured Bacon.

0:16:22    LunchBots stainless snack box.

0:16:47    SeaSnax Roasted Seaweed.

0:19:38    James Wilson (podcast).

0:24:58    KetoCaNa (podcast).

0:25:04    UCAN Superstarch (podcast).

0:27:12    Gastrointestinal Complaints During Exercise: Prevalence, Etiology, and Nutritional Recommendations.

0:28:52    Carrying two copies of a somewhat common allele of the FMO3 gene, defined as E308G and E258K, has been reported to lead to mild trimethylaminuria.

0:40:33    PHAT FIBRE.

0:42:56    Catabolic Blocker (podcast).

0:43:27    PharmaNAC (podcast).

0:44:03    Podcast: Should You Supplement with Antioxidants?

0:45:05    Meriva and EnteroMend (podcast).

0:50:29    BIOHACKER SUMMIT UK with Pando.

0:51:12    Creatine (article).

0:52:05    NiaCel (nicotinamide riboside) (podcast).

]]>
no
An Interview with a 4th Year Medical Student https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Rory.Heath.on.2016-06-22.at.07.15.mp3 Rory Heath is a columnist at Strength & Conditioning Research and a 4th-year medical student at King's College, London. Rory has a passion for sports medicine and attends many sports medicine conferences. Treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, common in contact sports like rugby, are frequently the focus of these events. In this interview, Rory talks about how some simple dietary changes may reduce the basal level of inflammation and reduce the number of injuries happening in the first place. Potentially inflammatory foods like wheat and dairy may be a cost-effective way to feed a rugby team in the short term, but if the diet ultimately contributes to an injury that requires surgery then clearly both the team and the player lose out.

The idea of preventing illness before it happens is not limited to sports medicine, and in this interview, Rory and I discuss some of the other diet and lifestyle hacks that assist with performance and longevity.

In this interview I mentioned:

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Rory.Heath.on.2016-06-22.at.07.15.mp3 Tue, 19 Jul 2016 09:07:52 GMT Christopher Kelly Rory Heath is a columnist at Strength & Conditioning Research and a 4th-year medical student at King's College, London. Rory has a passion for sports medicine and attends many sports medicine conferences. Treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, common in contact sports like rugby, are frequently the focus of these events. In this interview, Rory talks about how some simple dietary changes may reduce the basal level of inflammation and reduce the number of injuries happening in the first place. Potentially inflammatory foods like wheat and dairy may be a cost-effective way to feed a rugby team in the short term, but if the diet ultimately contributes to an injury that requires surgery then clearly both the team and the player lose out.

The idea of preventing illness before it happens is not limited to sports medicine, and in this interview, Rory and I discuss some of the other diet and lifestyle hacks that assist with performance and longevity.

In this interview I mentioned:

]]>
no
How to Track Effectively https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Daniel.Pardi.on.2016-06-08.at.10.35.mp3 Dan Pardi is a rare bird. Not only does Dan have a classical education in sports medicine and exercise physiology, he also spent time working with Dean Ornish at the Preventive Medicine Lifestyle Institute before spending a decade working in the pharmaceutical industry. Dan now collaborates with the Behavioral Sciences Department at Stanford University and the Departments of Neurology and Endocrinology at Leiden University and is also the CEO of a health-behavior technology company called Dan's Plan, which seeks to help people improve their health by establishing and sustaining an effective daily health practice.

In this interview, Dan talks about the practical use of tracking devices from the Quantified Self movement, and his new project, humanOS.

Dan’s new podcast, humanOS Radio (iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Overcast) has been at the top of my listening list for the past couple of months now, and for the first few episodes, Dan has focussed exclusively on interviewing professors within the realm of health, performance and longevity.

Dan also writes regularly on the blog at Dan’s Plan.

Here’s a brief outline of this interview with Dan Pardi:

0:00:26    Dan has been on my podcast once before.

0:02:15    Dean Ornish.

0:04:19    Dan works at Stanford under Jamie Zeitzer in the Circadian Biology Department.

0:07:56    dansplan.com.

0:10:23    My previous podcast with Dr. Tommy Wood where we discuss rodent studies.

0:11:55    Radiographic studies at University of Washington.

0:15:52    humanOS

0:21:38    humanOS Radio podcast.

0:25:45    Zeo, Inc.

0:29:59    Tim Ferriss almond butter at night

0:31:39    IFTTT.

0:52:48    Dan’s Plan on Facebook and Twitter.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Daniel.Pardi.on.2016-06-08.at.10.35.mp3 Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:07:07 GMT Christopher Kelly Dan Pardi is a rare bird. Not only does Dan have a classical education in sports medicine and exercise physiology, he also spent time working with Dean Ornish at the Preventive Medicine Lifestyle Institute before spending a decade working in the pharmaceutical industry. Dan now collaborates with the Behavioral Sciences Department at Stanford University and the Departments of Neurology and Endocrinology at Leiden University and is also the CEO of a health-behavior technology company called Dan's Plan, which seeks to help people improve their health by establishing and sustaining an effective daily health practice.

In this interview, Dan talks about the practical use of tracking devices from the Quantified Self movement, and his new project, humanOS.

Dan’s new podcast, humanOS Radio (iTunes, Stitcher, YouTube, Overcast) has been at the top of my listening list for the past couple of months now, and for the first few episodes, Dan has focussed exclusively on interviewing professors within the realm of health, performance and longevity.

Dan also writes regularly on the blog at Dan’s Plan.

Here’s a brief outline of this interview with Dan Pardi:

0:00:26    Dan has been on my podcast once before.

0:02:15    Dean Ornish.

0:04:19    Dan works at Stanford under Jamie Zeitzer in the Circadian Biology Department.

0:07:56    dansplan.com.

0:10:23    My previous podcast with Dr. Tommy Wood where we discuss rodent studies.

0:11:55    Radiographic studies at University of Washington.

0:15:52    humanOS

0:21:38    humanOS Radio podcast.

0:25:45    Zeo, Inc.

0:29:59    Tim Ferriss almond butter at night

0:31:39    IFTTT.

0:52:48    Dan’s Plan on Facebook and Twitter.

]]>
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The Race to Make a Ketone Supplement https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-06-07.at.10.29.mp3 Two brilliant scientists are racing to be the first to commercialise exogenous ketones. The applications include athletic performance and metabolic therapies for CNS oxygen toxicity, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the red corner, Dr. Richard Veech, one of the greatest living minds in basic biochemistry. In the blue corner, the also brilliant renegade chemist Patrick Arnold. Stuck somewhere in the middle is superhuman researcher Dominic D’Agostino, associate professor in the department of molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and a visiting research scientist at the IHMC.

Patrick clearly has the head start, and I’ve been supplementing with his KetoForce and KetoCaNa products for over two years for bike races. Imagine my horror then when Dr. Veech appeared on the Bulletproof and Ben Greenfield podcasts to claim that Patrick’s racemic ketone salts were “harmful and inhibitory” and “a dumb for convenience of manufacturing”.

Caution is warranted.

A racemic mixture is one that includes both the D and L enantiomers. The source of the D and L labels was the Latin words dexter (on the right) and laevus (on the left). You may also have seen the labels R and S. R comes from rectus (right-handed) and S from sinister (left-handed). The physiological form of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is the D form. This is the same reason why Tommy would never recommend synthetic vitamins (vitamin E is a good example), because you get a racemic mixture and the inactive form tends to inhibit the more active form.

L-BHB is also metabolised.

BHB is not like the synthetic vitamins. Through some elegant radiotracer studies, Dr. Veech’s colleague  Dr. Henri Brunengraber showed that the L-form is neither harmful nor inhibitory, and is also metabolised and converts to acetoacetate and back to D-BHB. The conversion is less efficient from the L-form, and relatively more of it is used for lipid synthesis and direct oxidation. 100% D-BHB might be better than a racemic mixture, but it’s not harmful or inhibitory. As Dominic points out, racemic compounds have anti-seizure, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects.

If this all sounds a bit cloak and dagger.

It’s because it probably is. After an in depth conversation and then interview for the Keto Summit, Professor Kieran Clarke of Oxford University made a compelling case for the D-BHB ester that has yet to be commercialised. My feeling is that her and Dr. Veech have a superior product, but that Dr. Veech’s recent comments about racemic mixtures are anticompetitive opinion not backed up by evidence.

Is Dominic completely neutral in all this?

Probably not. See US patent US20140350105 and US20140073693 (Savind, Inc is Patrick Arnold’s company). Are we neutral? Nope. We sell an MCT oil powder!

Do you have questions for Dominic or Patrick? Please leave them in the comments section below then sign up for the Keto Summit and I’ll do my best to ask the experts when I interview them next month.

Also see the two new excellent podcast interviews with Dominic on STEM-Talk and The Quantified Body.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood:

0:00:20    Podcast: Bulletproof Radio.

0:00:26    Podcast: Ben Greenfield.

0:01:10    Dr. Richard Veech.

0:02:28    1995 paper: Insulin, ketone bodies, and mitochondrial energy transduction.

0:03:08    Prototype Nutrition.

0:07:37    Atrial natriuretic peptide.

0:08:10    KetoCaNa.

0:10:04    Dominic and Patrick’s study Effects of exogenous ketone supplementation on blood ketone, glucose, triglyceride, and lipoprotein levels in Sprague-Dawley rats.

0:13:19    Khan Academy: Stereochemistry.

0:15:03    D-L-alpha tocopherol.

0:22:32    NAD+/NADH ratios. See The Secret Life of NAD+: An Old Metabolite Controlling New Metabolic Signaling Pathways.

0:22:35    Ubiquinone.

0:23:25    Khan Academy: ATP hydrolysis: Gibbs free energy.

0:25:13    28% increase in cardiac efficiency

0:33:12    Dr. Mary Newport.

0:33:25    Steve Newport case study.

0:35:07    Sirtuins.

0:35:41    Lactate and pyruvate.

0:41:52    Kraft dried blood spot oral glucose tolerance test with insulin.

0:44:35    PHAT FIBRE hypoallergenic MCT oil powder.

0:44:56    Concierge Clinical Coaching private membership group.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Tommy.Wood.on.2016-06-07.at.10.29.mp3 Thu, 23 Jun 2016 18:06:33 GMT Christopher Kelly Two brilliant scientists are racing to be the first to commercialise exogenous ketones. The applications include athletic performance and metabolic therapies for CNS oxygen toxicity, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the red corner, Dr. Richard Veech, one of the greatest living minds in basic biochemistry. In the blue corner, the also brilliant renegade chemist Patrick Arnold. Stuck somewhere in the middle is superhuman researcher Dominic D’Agostino, associate professor in the department of molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and a visiting research scientist at the IHMC.

Patrick clearly has the head start, and I’ve been supplementing with his KetoForce and KetoCaNa products for over two years for bike races. Imagine my horror then when Dr. Veech appeared on the Bulletproof and Ben Greenfield podcasts to claim that Patrick’s racemic ketone salts were “harmful and inhibitory” and “a dumb for convenience of manufacturing”.

Caution is warranted.

A racemic mixture is one that includes both the D and L enantiomers. The source of the D and L labels was the Latin words dexter (on the right) and laevus (on the left). You may also have seen the labels R and S. R comes from rectus (right-handed) and S from sinister (left-handed). The physiological form of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is the D form. This is the same reason why Tommy would never recommend synthetic vitamins (vitamin E is a good example), because you get a racemic mixture and the inactive form tends to inhibit the more active form.

L-BHB is also metabolised.

BHB is not like the synthetic vitamins. Through some elegant radiotracer studies, Dr. Veech’s colleague  Dr. Henri Brunengraber showed that the L-form is neither harmful nor inhibitory, and is also metabolised and converts to acetoacetate and back to D-BHB. The conversion is less efficient from the L-form, and relatively more of it is used for lipid synthesis and direct oxidation. 100% D-BHB might be better than a racemic mixture, but it’s not harmful or inhibitory. As Dominic points out, racemic compounds have anti-seizure, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects.

If this all sounds a bit cloak and dagger.

It’s because it probably is. After an in depth conversation and then interview for the Keto Summit, Professor Kieran Clarke of Oxford University made a compelling case for the D-BHB ester that has yet to be commercialised. My feeling is that her and Dr. Veech have a superior product, but that Dr. Veech’s recent comments about racemic mixtures are anticompetitive opinion not backed up by evidence.

Is Dominic completely neutral in all this?

Probably not. See US patent US20140350105 and US20140073693 (Savind, Inc is Patrick Arnold’s company). Are we neutral? Nope. We sell an MCT oil powder!

Do you have questions for Dominic or Patrick? Please leave them in the comments section below then sign up for the Keto Summit and I’ll do my best to ask the experts when I interview them next month.

Also see the two new excellent podcast interviews with Dominic on STEM-Talk and The Quantified Body.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood:

0:00:20    Podcast: Bulletproof Radio.

0:00:26    Podcast: Ben Greenfield.

0:01:10    Dr. Richard Veech.

0:02:28    1995 paper: Insulin, ketone bodies, and mitochondrial energy transduction.

0:03:08    Prototype Nutrition.

0:07:37    Atrial natriuretic peptide.

0:08:10    KetoCaNa.

0:10:04    Dominic and Patrick’s study Effects of exogenous ketone supplementation on blood ketone, glucose, triglyceride, and lipoprotein levels in Sprague-Dawley rats.

0:13:19    Khan Academy: Stereochemistry.

0:15:03    D-L-alpha tocopherol.

0:22:32    NAD+/NADH ratios. See The Secret Life of NAD+: An Old Metabolite Controlling New Metabolic Signaling Pathways.

0:22:35    Ubiquinone.

0:23:25    Khan Academy: ATP hydrolysis: Gibbs free energy.

0:25:13    28% increase in cardiac efficiency

0:33:12    Dr. Mary Newport.

0:33:25    Steve Newport case study.

0:35:07    Sirtuins.

0:35:41    Lactate and pyruvate.

0:41:52    Kraft dried blood spot oral glucose tolerance test with insulin.

0:44:35    PHAT FIBRE hypoallergenic MCT oil powder.

0:44:56    Concierge Clinical Coaching private membership group.

]]>
clean
Nootropics 101: How to Hack Memory, Creativity, and Motivation https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ryan.Munsey.on.2016-05-17.at.11.00.mp3 In the past two weeks for the Keto Summit, I interviewed Dave Asprey, Mark Sisson and Professors Tim Noakes, Kieran Clarke and Tom Seyfried. These are just five of the 33 expert interview I have lined up. Each interview is around one hour or 10,000 words long. So much wisdom, sometimes decades in the making, is there anything I can do to help retain some of it in my long term memory? Quite possibly: nootropics are are drugs, supplements, or other substances that improve cognitive function, particularly executive functions, memory, creativity, or motivation, in healthy individuals. I’m completely new to the idea, and if you are too you’ll find this podcast both helpful and intriguing.

My expert guest is Ryan Munsey. Ryan is a former fitness model and gym owner turned writer, speaker, and biohacker. He's a mental and physical performance specialist with a degree in Food Science & Human Nutrition from Clemson University. An avid hunter, you'll often find him in the woods.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Munsey:

0:00:12    Optimal Performance Podcast.

0:01:12    Book: Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast! By Mark Sisson and Brad Kearns.

0:01:17    Keto Summit.

0:05:50    House of Strength gym.

0:05:57    Ryan has written for EliteFts, T-Nation, Men's Fitness.

0:06:06    Natural Stacks.

0:06:07    Joe Rogan Podcast.

0:06:08    Dave Asprey of the Bulletproof Radio Podcast.

0:11:36    Mental and physical performance stacks.

0:12:25    CILTEP (use the discount code CILTEPNBT).

0:13:04    My transcriptions are done by the wonderful people at Cabbage Tree.

0:16:14    Eat to Perform podcast.

0:17:37    Modafinil.

0:18:20    Racetam family.

0:19:30    Smart caffeine.

0:19:46    Abelard Lindsay.

0:20:19    Phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) inhibitor.

0:20:24    Khan Academy video: G Protein Coupled Receptors and cAMP.

0:21:44    Book: The Edge Effect: Achieve Total Health and Longevity with the Balanced Brain Advantage by Eric R. Braverman.

0:22:15    L-Alpha glycerylphosphorylcholine (alpha-GPC).

0:22:18    Choline.

0:22:22    ONNIT Alpha Brain.

0:22:28    Bulletproof Choline Force.

0:23:35    Dopamine Brain Food and Serotonin Brain Food.

0:26:19    CILTEP (use the discount code CILTEPNBT).

0:28:17    Grand master of memory Mattias Ribbing.

0:40:14    NAC podcast.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Ryan.Munsey.on.2016-05-17.at.11.00.mp3 Fri, 17 Jun 2016 12:06:10 GMT Christopher Kelly In the past two weeks for the Keto Summit, I interviewed Dave Asprey, Mark Sisson and Professors Tim Noakes, Kieran Clarke and Tom Seyfried. These are just five of the 33 expert interview I have lined up. Each interview is around one hour or 10,000 words long. So much wisdom, sometimes decades in the making, is there anything I can do to help retain some of it in my long term memory? Quite possibly: nootropics are are drugs, supplements, or other substances that improve cognitive function, particularly executive functions, memory, creativity, or motivation, in healthy individuals. I’m completely new to the idea, and if you are too you’ll find this podcast both helpful and intriguing.

My expert guest is Ryan Munsey. Ryan is a former fitness model and gym owner turned writer, speaker, and biohacker. He's a mental and physical performance specialist with a degree in Food Science & Human Nutrition from Clemson University. An avid hunter, you'll often find him in the woods.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Ryan Munsey:

0:00:12    Optimal Performance Podcast.

0:01:12    Book: Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast! By Mark Sisson and Brad Kearns.

0:01:17    Keto Summit.

0:05:50    House of Strength gym.

0:05:57    Ryan has written for EliteFts, T-Nation, Men's Fitness.

0:06:06    Natural Stacks.

0:06:07    Joe Rogan Podcast.

0:06:08    Dave Asprey of the Bulletproof Radio Podcast.

0:11:36    Mental and physical performance stacks.

0:12:25    CILTEP (use the discount code CILTEPNBT).

0:13:04    My transcriptions are done by the wonderful people at Cabbage Tree.

0:16:14    Eat to Perform podcast.

0:17:37    Modafinil.

0:18:20    Racetam family.

0:19:30    Smart caffeine.

0:19:46    Abelard Lindsay.

0:20:19    Phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4) inhibitor.

0:20:24    Khan Academy video: G Protein Coupled Receptors and cAMP.

0:21:44    Book: The Edge Effect: Achieve Total Health and Longevity with the Balanced Brain Advantage by Eric R. Braverman.

0:22:15    L-Alpha glycerylphosphorylcholine (alpha-GPC).

0:22:18    Choline.

0:22:22    ONNIT Alpha Brain.

0:22:28    Bulletproof Choline Force.

0:23:35    Dopamine Brain Food and Serotonin Brain Food.

0:26:19    CILTEP (use the discount code CILTEPNBT).

0:28:17    Grand master of memory Mattias Ribbing.

0:40:14    NAC podcast.

]]>
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Foodloose Recap https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/foodloose_wrapup.mp3 “Gary Taubes is in the building!” exclaimed Foodloose host Dr. Maryanne Demasi. Gary was scheduled to arrive at Iceland’s international airport the morning of the conference, and he’d already missed his keynote slot. British cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra had assumed Gary’s position, and I’d started to wonder if the rest of the speakers would be advanced in the same way. Fortunately, that was not to be the case, and Gary delivered an impressive display of public speaking of the likes I’ve not seen before. The man barely looked down once during the entire presentation and spoke with extraordinary fluency. The Harpa concert hall that hosted the event was even more impressive than Gary's public speaking, the island even more impressive still.

The complete lineup of speakers at the IHS Foodloose conference 2016:

  • Dorrit Moussaieff, patron and First Lady of Iceland.
  • Dr. Aseem Malhotra, British Cardiologist.
  • Gary Taubes, author: Good Calories, Bad Calories.
  • Dr. Axel Sigurdsson, Icelandic Cardiologist.
  • Professor Tim Noakes, South African emeritus professor of exercise science.
  • Denise Minger, author: Death by Food Pyramid.
  • Dr. Tommy Wood, research scientist and NBT Chief Medical Officer.

The day after the conference, I had the chance to sit down with Tommy and discuss what was presented at the first ever Icelandic Health Symposium event.

We loved our time on the island and can’t wait to return next year.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood

0:00:42    Dr. Guðmundur Jóhannsson on this podcast.

0:02:08    Dr. Aseem Malhotra.

0:02:40    Aseem on the BBC News.

0:03:19    Action on Sugar.

0:03:23    Run on Fat movie.

0:09:40    Lilly Nichols on the Paleo Baby podcast.

0:19:20    Book: The Big Fat Surprise.

0:21:59    About Kevin Hall’s study on this podcast.

0:22:40    Dr. Axel Sigurdsson.

0:29:07    Prof. Tim Noakes.

0:33:19    Book: Super Food for Superchildren.

0:39:44    Denise Minger: Carbosis.

0:41:22    Swank Foundation for MS.

0:41:24    Lester M. Morrison, MD.

0:41:58    Rice Diet.

0:48:56    Dean Ornish.

0:48:59    Michael Gregor’s nutritionfacts.org

0:51:04    Rich Roll.

0:51:05    Ray Cronise.

1:00:19    Bryan Walsh social isolation podcast.

1:02:39    Chris Masterjohn melanopsin podcast.

1:10:19    Book: The Blue Zones.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/foodloose_wrapup.mp3 Thu, 09 Jun 2016 20:06:17 GMT Christopher Kelly “Gary Taubes is in the building!” exclaimed Foodloose host Dr. Maryanne Demasi. Gary was scheduled to arrive at Iceland’s international airport the morning of the conference, and he’d already missed his keynote slot. British cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra had assumed Gary’s position, and I’d started to wonder if the rest of the speakers would be advanced in the same way. Fortunately, that was not to be the case, and Gary delivered an impressive display of public speaking of the likes I’ve not seen before. The man barely looked down once during the entire presentation and spoke with extraordinary fluency. The Harpa concert hall that hosted the event was even more impressive than Gary's public speaking, the island even more impressive still.

The complete lineup of speakers at the IHS Foodloose conference 2016:

  • Dorrit Moussaieff, patron and First Lady of Iceland.
  • Dr. Aseem Malhotra, British Cardiologist.
  • Gary Taubes, author: Good Calories, Bad Calories.
  • Dr. Axel Sigurdsson, Icelandic Cardiologist.
  • Professor Tim Noakes, South African emeritus professor of exercise science.
  • Denise Minger, author: Death by Food Pyramid.
  • Dr. Tommy Wood, research scientist and NBT Chief Medical Officer.

The day after the conference, I had the chance to sit down with Tommy and discuss what was presented at the first ever Icelandic Health Symposium event.

We loved our time on the island and can’t wait to return next year.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood

0:00:42    Dr. Guðmundur Jóhannsson on this podcast.

0:02:08    Dr. Aseem Malhotra.

0:02:40    Aseem on the BBC News.

0:03:19    Action on Sugar.

0:03:23    Run on Fat movie.

0:09:40    Lilly Nichols on the Paleo Baby podcast.

0:19:20    Book: The Big Fat Surprise.

0:21:59    About Kevin Hall’s study on this podcast.

0:22:40    Dr. Axel Sigurdsson.

0:29:07    Prof. Tim Noakes.

0:33:19    Book: Super Food for Superchildren.

0:39:44    Denise Minger: Carbosis.

0:41:22    Swank Foundation for MS.

0:41:24    Lester M. Morrison, MD.

0:41:58    Rice Diet.

0:48:56    Dean Ornish.

0:48:59    Michael Gregor’s nutritionfacts.org

0:51:04    Rich Roll.

0:51:05    Ray Cronise.

1:00:19    Bryan Walsh social isolation podcast.

1:02:39    Chris Masterjohn melanopsin podcast.

1:10:19    Book: The Blue Zones.

]]>
no
Hyperinsulinaemia and Cognitive Decline with Catherine Crofts, Ph.D https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Catherine.Crofts.on.2016-05-21.at.18.01.mp3 Catherine Crofts is a New Zealand community-based clinical pharmacist who firmly believes in using the lowest dose of the least number of medications to treat disease. After 17 years of practice, she feels more like a “disease management specialist” than a health professional.

Together with Caryn Zinn, Mark Wheldon, and Grant Schofield, Catherine is the author of Hyperinsulinemia: A unifying theory of chronic disease?

Catherine blogs at Lifestyle Before Medication.

Catherine will soon be known as Dr. Crofts after successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis where she analysed the oral glucose and insulin tolerance data of Dr. Joseph Kraft. Catherine will talk more about that work and why fasting insulin is a useless biomarker in the upcoming Keto Summit, in this interview we focus on the role of insulin resistance in dementia.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Catherine Crofts:

0:00:42    Professor Grant Schofield and Dr. Caryn Zinn.

0:00:47    Dr. Joseph Kraft from Chicago. Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You.

0:02:37    Schizophrenia and bipolar disease.

0:03:41    Type 3 diabetes.

0:03:45    Alzheimer's dementia is very, very much a disease of diabetes and insulin and glucose.

0:04:00    Protein tangles within the brain.

0:04:03    Vascular dementia which is associated with the blood vessels.

0:04:25    Lewy body dementia which is another type of protein deposit.

0:04:32    Amyloid plaques.

0:04:42    Most people with dementia will have a mixed dementia.

0:04:53    CT scan of the brain.

0:06:04    Substantia nigra and movement problems.

0:06:13    Frontotemporal system system

0:07:11    Dr. Kirk Parsley talked about Professor Robert Sapolsky.

0:10:44    The Whitehall Study showed some people noticing cognitive changes starting at age 48.

0:12:15    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene.

0:12:21    Neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

0:12:28    Tau protein.

0:13:22    Large and small clumps of beta-amyloid might be protective.

0:13:51    Synaptic plasticity and PSA-NCAM

0:14:46    Type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors for Alzheimer's.

0:16:05    Insulin prevents a process called fibrinolysis.

0:17:30    GLUT1.

0:24:13    Glutamate can be a little bit toxic to the brain.

0:24:46    GABA is a calming neurotransmitter.

0:27:22    A ketogenic diet for dementia.

0:41:50    Keto Summit.

 
]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Catherine.Crofts.on.2016-05-21.at.18.01.mp3 Thu, 02 Jun 2016 17:06:53 GMT Christopher Kelly Catherine Crofts is a New Zealand community-based clinical pharmacist who firmly believes in using the lowest dose of the least number of medications to treat disease. After 17 years of practice, she feels more like a “disease management specialist” than a health professional.

Together with Caryn Zinn, Mark Wheldon, and Grant Schofield, Catherine is the author of Hyperinsulinemia: A unifying theory of chronic disease?

Catherine blogs at Lifestyle Before Medication.

Catherine will soon be known as Dr. Crofts after successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis where she analysed the oral glucose and insulin tolerance data of Dr. Joseph Kraft. Catherine will talk more about that work and why fasting insulin is a useless biomarker in the upcoming Keto Summit, in this interview we focus on the role of insulin resistance in dementia.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Catherine Crofts:

0:00:42    Professor Grant Schofield and Dr. Caryn Zinn.

0:00:47    Dr. Joseph Kraft from Chicago. Book: Diabetes Epidemic & You.

0:02:37    Schizophrenia and bipolar disease.

0:03:41    Type 3 diabetes.

0:03:45    Alzheimer's dementia is very, very much a disease of diabetes and insulin and glucose.

0:04:00    Protein tangles within the brain.

0:04:03    Vascular dementia which is associated with the blood vessels.

0:04:25    Lewy body dementia which is another type of protein deposit.

0:04:32    Amyloid plaques.

0:04:42    Most people with dementia will have a mixed dementia.

0:04:53    CT scan of the brain.

0:06:04    Substantia nigra and movement problems.

0:06:13    Frontotemporal system system

0:07:11    Dr. Kirk Parsley talked about Professor Robert Sapolsky.

0:10:44    The Whitehall Study showed some people noticing cognitive changes starting at age 48.

0:12:15    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene.

0:12:21    Neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

0:12:28    Tau protein.

0:13:22    Large and small clumps of beta-amyloid might be protective.

0:13:51    Synaptic plasticity and PSA-NCAM

0:14:46    Type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest risk factors for Alzheimer's.

0:16:05    Insulin prevents a process called fibrinolysis.

0:17:30    GLUT1.

0:24:13    Glutamate can be a little bit toxic to the brain.

0:24:46    GABA is a calming neurotransmitter.

0:27:22    A ketogenic diet for dementia.

0:41:50    Keto Summit.

 
]]>
no
Keto UFC Fighter Kyle Kingsbury: Biohacking and the Missing Low Gear https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/kyle.kingsbury.on.2016-05-18.at.12.01.mp3 I couldn’t help laughing when former UFC fighter Kyle Kingsbury described the trouble he was having deadlifting 525 lb when 495 came so easily. 180 is a problem for me! The ketogenic diet has removed Kyle’s “low gear”, but the sacrifice is worth it because, in the ketogenic state, Kyle enjoys an enormous cognitive benefit and less systemic inflammation. Having suffered two orbital fractures that ultimately lead to his retirement, I wonder if Kyle is an example of how ketosis can help with traumatic brain injury.

Do not supplement with raw potato starch!

Kyle and his wife are yet further examples of people that didn’t do well supplementing with raw potato starch. Kyle noticed changes in his immune system that lead to an increase in sickness, and his wife Natasha gained body fat. Both were able to resolve those issues following Grace Liu’s plan that included psyllium, acacia, and inulin-FOS together with a bifidobacteria probiotic.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Kyle Kingsbury

0:01:06    Kyle is 6'3.5", 235lb 20" neck!

0:02:20    He won his first two fights in under 30 seconds.

0:04:35    American Kickboxing Academy in San Jose: heavyweight champ Cain Velasquez, current middleweight champion Luke Rockhold, and current light heavyweight champion Dana Cormier.

0:06:27    Muay Thai.

0:07:15    Brazilian jiu-jitsu.

0:08:24    Book: Easy Strength: How to Get a Lot Stronger Than Your Competition-And Dominate in Your Sport.

0:08:40    Book: Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast!

0:09:45    Podcast: Elite Spartan racer Elijah Wood.

0:10:16    Kyle has a one year old boy called Bear.

0:10:30    Carb backloading.

0:10:53    When Kyle deadlifts 495, reaching 525 shouldn’t be a problem, but it is on a ketogenic diet.

0:12:07    Ben Greenfield.

0:14:07    Keto has helped with sleep deprivation and shift work.

0:14:39    Podcast: Dominic D'Agostino on Tim Ferriss’s show.

0:15:25    Podcast: Kirk Parsley on sleep.

0:15:32    Keto Summit.

0:19:04    Grace Liu.

0:19:30    uBiome app.

0:20:51    Potato starch debacle.

0:22:28    Bionic fibre.

0:22:38    Bifidomax probiotic.

0:26:04    Podcast: organic acids.

0:29:05    Podcast: Endurance Planet.

0:29:50    Book: The Better Baby Book: How to Have a Healthier, Smarter, Happier Baby.

0:31:08    Supplement: carnitine.

0:31:12    Podcast: N-Acetylcysteine (NAC).

0:34:12    The Origin (and future) of the Ketogenic Diet on Robb Wolf’s site.

0:39:41    Book: Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance.

0:40:20    Podcast: Brad Dieter, Ph.D.

0:42:22    Ultra Adventures 50k run.

0:45:16    Podcast: Joe Rogan Experience #756 - Kyle Kingsbury.

0:46:52    Book: Feed Zone Portables: A Cookbook of On-the-Go Food for Athletes.

0:52:05    Paul Chek: “Sooner or later your health will be your number one concern.”

0:53:01    @Kingsbu on Twitter and Instagram.

0:53:08    Podcast: Mom's Garage (not released yet).

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/kyle.kingsbury.on.2016-05-18.at.12.01.mp3 Fri, 27 May 2016 02:05:00 GMT Christopher Kelly I couldn’t help laughing when former UFC fighter Kyle Kingsbury described the trouble he was having deadlifting 525 lb when 495 came so easily. 180 is a problem for me! The ketogenic diet has removed Kyle’s “low gear”, but the sacrifice is worth it because, in the ketogenic state, Kyle enjoys an enormous cognitive benefit and less systemic inflammation. Having suffered two orbital fractures that ultimately lead to his retirement, I wonder if Kyle is an example of how ketosis can help with traumatic brain injury.

Do not supplement with raw potato starch!

Kyle and his wife are yet further examples of people that didn’t do well supplementing with raw potato starch. Kyle noticed changes in his immune system that lead to an increase in sickness, and his wife Natasha gained body fat. Both were able to resolve those issues following Grace Liu’s plan that included psyllium, acacia, and inulin-FOS together with a bifidobacteria probiotic.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Kyle Kingsbury

0:01:06    Kyle is 6'3.5", 235lb 20" neck!

0:02:20    He won his first two fights in under 30 seconds.

0:04:35    American Kickboxing Academy in San Jose: heavyweight champ Cain Velasquez, current middleweight champion Luke Rockhold, and current light heavyweight champion Dana Cormier.

0:06:27    Muay Thai.

0:07:15    Brazilian jiu-jitsu.

0:08:24    Book: Easy Strength: How to Get a Lot Stronger Than Your Competition-And Dominate in Your Sport.

0:08:40    Book: Primal Endurance: Escape chronic cardio and carbohydrate dependency and become a fat burning beast!

0:09:45    Podcast: Elite Spartan racer Elijah Wood.

0:10:16    Kyle has a one year old boy called Bear.

0:10:30    Carb backloading.

0:10:53    When Kyle deadlifts 495, reaching 525 shouldn’t be a problem, but it is on a ketogenic diet.

0:12:07    Ben Greenfield.

0:14:07    Keto has helped with sleep deprivation and shift work.

0:14:39    Podcast: Dominic D'Agostino on Tim Ferriss’s show.

0:15:25    Podcast: Kirk Parsley on sleep.

0:15:32    Keto Summit.

0:19:04    Grace Liu.

0:19:30    uBiome app.

0:20:51    Potato starch debacle.

0:22:28    Bionic fibre.

0:22:38    Bifidomax probiotic.

0:26:04    Podcast: organic acids.

0:29:05    Podcast: Endurance Planet.

0:29:50    Book: The Better Baby Book: How to Have a Healthier, Smarter, Happier Baby.

0:31:08    Supplement: carnitine.

0:31:12    Podcast: N-Acetylcysteine (NAC).

0:34:12    The Origin (and future) of the Ketogenic Diet on Robb Wolf’s site.

0:39:41    Book: Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance.

0:40:20    Podcast: Brad Dieter, Ph.D.

0:42:22    Ultra Adventures 50k run.

0:45:16    Podcast: Joe Rogan Experience #756 - Kyle Kingsbury.

0:46:52    Book: Feed Zone Portables: A Cookbook of On-the-Go Food for Athletes.

0:52:05    Paul Chek: “Sooner or later your health will be your number one concern.”

0:53:01    @Kingsbu on Twitter and Instagram.

0:53:08    Podcast: Mom's Garage (not released yet).

]]>
clean
How to Get Clients for Your Health Coaching Business https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jordan.Reasoner.on.2016-05-11.at.12.13.mp3 Imagine your name is Bob. You’re 47 years old, you have a beautiful wife, two wonderful kids, a lovely dog and a career you enjoy. Life is great is except for the nagging pain in your right pinky finger. It started as a minor irritation but now has gotten to the point where it’s affecting your work and your sleep. As you lay tossing and turning one night, all you can think about is the pain. Then suddenly you decide it’s time to get up and take action. You kiss your wife and sneak out the bedroom. The dog is confused and follows you downstairs and into the kitchen. You open up the lid of your laptop and open a new browser window. Google appears.

What are you going to search for?

Doctor [Your Name Here] Ultrawellness?

Optimal Health Nutrition Coach?

Of course not. You’re going to search for “right pinky finger pain” or some variation of those words.

So why is then that so many practitioners, good ones, create websites that are all about themselves?

You know the site I mean. The one with the picture of the practitioner on the front page, possibly wearing a white lab coat and a stethoscope around their neck. There’s a list of credentials and a longer list of health complaints the practitioner "specialises" in. The list includes virtually every condition known to man. Think about Bob reading that page. Is he going to be excited? Now imagine Bob’s delight as he discovers your series of articles talking about the most common root causes of right pinky finger pain and what you can do about them. Bob is so delighted with what he’s found that he wants to wake his wife to share the good news. "Finally! Someone that understands me" is what Bob is thinking.

Being specific about who we’re talking to is something we’ve done by accident at Nourish Balance Thrive. I’m a master’s athlete whose health fell apart in pursuit of the upgrade to pro mountain biker racer. Not everyone we work with is a mountain biker, but everyone is an athlete (even if they won’t admit it).

Starting a new health coaching business is about more than being a great practitioner.

Of course, you must be qualified to help people, but if you’re not specific with your marketing, you’ll end up helping nobody. You only have to walk down the street anywhere in the US to recognise how many people need help with their diet and lifestyle, but did you know that 50% of naturopaths never see a patient? 60% of acupuncturists go back to a previous career after less than three years of work? And yet at the same time, as of last year, there were three billion people online, and we know that there's another three billion people that are coming in the next five years or so depending on what study you read. There is no shortage of people that need your help.

This is but one of the many lessons I’ve learned as a result of completing the Practitioner Liberation Project. Listen to this interview with gut health guru and marketing conversion expert Jordan Reasoner to discover some of the others.

Click here to sign up for Jordan’s webinar.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jordan Reasoner

0:02:12    Jordan's story.

0:03:44    Book: Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet.

0:04:48    Jordan had a parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis and took a medicine called Ivermectin.

0:05:37    SCD Lifestyle will become healthygut.com

0:05:56    Their list now has 250,000 members.

0:08:14    We both did the Kalish Mentorship.

0:08:33    One email, Jordan and Steve were booked out for a month, 600 clients in the next year.

0:09:32    The gut wizard: Brie Wieselman, L.Ac.

0:13:44    50% of naturopaths never see a patient

0:13:49    60% of acupuncturists go back to a previous career within three years.

0:25:41    1.5M people in the US alone with Rheumatoid arthritis.

0:26:14    1.7B people on Facebook.

0:29:53    Start with the thing that you're passionate about.

0:32:38    Ask yourself who you want to work with.

0:38:10    500 practitioners in the PLP.

0:45:57    WeScribeIt.

0:46:47    The Essential Keto Cookbook.

0:49:33    Business supports systems.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/Jordan.Reasoner.on.2016-05-11.at.12.13.mp3 Thu, 19 May 2016 17:05:15 GMT Christopher Kelly Imagine your name is Bob. You’re 47 years old, you have a beautiful wife, two wonderful kids, a lovely dog and a career you enjoy. Life is great is except for the nagging pain in your right pinky finger. It started as a minor irritation but now has gotten to the point where it’s affecting your work and your sleep. As you lay tossing and turning one night, all you can think about is the pain. Then suddenly you decide it’s time to get up and take action. You kiss your wife and sneak out the bedroom. The dog is confused and follows you downstairs and into the kitchen. You open up the lid of your laptop and open a new browser window. Google appears.

What are you going to search for?

Doctor [Your Name Here] Ultrawellness?

Optimal Health Nutrition Coach?

Of course not. You’re going to search for “right pinky finger pain” or some variation of those words.

So why is then that so many practitioners, good ones, create websites that are all about themselves?

You know the site I mean. The one with the picture of the practitioner on the front page, possibly wearing a white lab coat and a stethoscope around their neck. There’s a list of credentials and a longer list of health complaints the practitioner "specialises" in. The list includes virtually every condition known to man. Think about Bob reading that page. Is he going to be excited? Now imagine Bob’s delight as he discovers your series of articles talking about the most common root causes of right pinky finger pain and what you can do about them. Bob is so delighted with what he’s found that he wants to wake his wife to share the good news. "Finally! Someone that understands me" is what Bob is thinking.

Being specific about who we’re talking to is something we’ve done by accident at Nourish Balance Thrive. I’m a master’s athlete whose health fell apart in pursuit of the upgrade to pro mountain biker racer. Not everyone we work with is a mountain biker, but everyone is an athlete (even if they won’t admit it).

Starting a new health coaching business is about more than being a great practitioner.

Of course, you must be qualified to help people, but if you’re not specific with your marketing, you’ll end up helping nobody. You only have to walk down the street anywhere in the US to recognise how many people need help with their diet and lifestyle, but did you know that 50% of naturopaths never see a patient? 60% of acupuncturists go back to a previous career after less than three years of work? And yet at the same time, as of last year, there were three billion people online, and we know that there's another three billion people that are coming in the next five years or so depending on what study you read. There is no shortage of people that need your help.

This is but one of the many lessons I’ve learned as a result of completing the Practitioner Liberation Project. Listen to this interview with gut health guru and marketing conversion expert Jordan Reasoner to discover some of the others.

Click here to sign up for Jordan’s webinar.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Jordan Reasoner

0:02:12    Jordan's story.

0:03:44    Book: Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet.

0:04:48    Jordan had a parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis and took a medicine called Ivermectin.

0:05:37    SCD Lifestyle will become healthygut.com

0:05:56    Their list now has 250,000 members.

0:08:14    We both did the Kalish Mentorship.

0:08:33    One email, Jordan and Steve were booked out for a month, 600 clients in the next year.

0:09:32    The gut wizard: Brie Wieselman, L.Ac.

0:13:44    50% of naturopaths never see a patient

0:13:49    60% of acupuncturists go back to a previous career within three years.

0:25:41    1.5M people in the US alone with Rheumatoid arthritis.

0:26:14    1.7B people on Facebook.

0:29:53    Start with the thing that you're passionate about.

0:32:38    Ask yourself who you want to work with.

0:38:10    500 practitioners in the PLP.

0:45:57    WeScribeIt.

0:46:47    The Essential Keto Cookbook.

0:49:33    Business supports systems.

]]>
clean
Vitamin D, Sunscreen, Skin Cancer: What You Need to Know https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/PrimalEyeSunshine.mp3 The Information Age brought with it’s ugly stepsister named Confusion. Never was this more true than for the information and misinformation surrounding vitamin D, sunscreen, and cancer.

Not getting burned makes intuitive sense, but will slathering on the sunscreen cause vitamin D deficiency?

Could vitamin D deficiency be causing the cancer that the sunscreen is supposed to be protecting against?

How much of a concern is skin cancer anyway?

Do we need to worry about toxic chemicals in sunscreen?

What type of sunscreen is best?

Join Dr. Tommy Wood and me in this podcast interview for everything you need to know about to protect your skin in the performance and longevity.

Also check out our article: Optimizing Vitamin D for Athletic Performance.

When Tommy and I recorded this podcast I was using the Badger brand suntan cream, since then I’ve switch to using Rocket Pure.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood

0:04:19    What is vitamin D (25-OH-D)?

0:05:37    Made using UVB radiation from the sun.

0:06:18    The standard reference ranges for blood levels of 25-OH-D are controversial.

0:07:49    Vitamin D affects calcium absorption, vitamin K2 controls where that calcium goes.

0:09:25    No sunscreen provides 100% block.

0:09:51    UVA is the type of radiation we’d like to avoid.

0:11:16    In studies, the use of sunscreen didn't reduce blood 25-OH-D levels.

0:11:59    Real-world application of sunscreen is less than in studies.

0:12:50    You need need a lot less light to make vitamin D than you do to burn.

0:13:20    Do not get burned!

0:13:34    Don't avoid sunlight either!

0:14:08    Childhood exposure to burning increases risk over a lifetime.

0:15:45    Three types of skin cancer.

0:16:50    Melanoma is the worst.

0:18:14    Risk is dependant on skin type and exposure.

0:20:15    We're now indoors all the time, then we go on holiday for 2 weeks.

0:21:06    Dark skin people living far from the equator are at risk of vitamin D deficiency.

0:22:08    Endogenous vitamin D synthesis is rate-limited, taking a supplement is not.

0:23:31    25-OH-D deficiency is associated with autoimmunity, but the supplement doesn't fix the disease.

0:24:14    There may be something special about sun exposure.

0:26:12    The SPF system is flawed.

0:28:19    Buy factor 20 and re-apply.

0:29:58    Chemicals in suntan cream.

0:31:39    Endocrine disrupters.

0:32:22    Beware rodent models with unrealistic dosing.

0:33:04    Zinc or titanium dioxide are probably best.

0:35:09    The UK love their fragrances.

0:36:37    The skin microbiome.

0:38:04    Can the zinc and titanium become systemic?

0:38:58    Titanium is not inert.

0:41:06    Very small amounts are absorbed and we probably don't need to worry about it.

0:41:44    Again, some flawed rodent models out there.

]]>
cck197@cck197.net https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/PrimalEyeSunshine.mp3 Thu, 12 May 2016 17:05:58 GMT Christopher Kelly The Information Age brought with it’s ugly stepsister named Confusion. Never was this more true than for the information and misinformation surrounding vitamin D, sunscreen, and cancer.

Not getting burned makes intuitive sense, but will slathering on the sunscreen cause vitamin D deficiency?

Could vitamin D deficiency be causing the cancer that the sunscreen is supposed to be protecting against?

How much of a concern is skin cancer anyway?

Do we need to worry about toxic chemicals in sunscreen?

What type of sunscreen is best?

Join Dr. Tommy Wood and me in this podcast interview for everything you need to know about to protect your skin in the performance and longevity.

Also check out our article: Optimizing Vitamin D for Athletic Performance.

When Tommy and I recorded this podcast I was using the Badger brand suntan cream, since then I’ve switch to using Rocket Pure.

Here’s the outline of this interview with Dr. Tommy Wood

0:04:19    What is vitamin D (25-OH-D)?

0:05:37    Made using UVB radiation from the sun.

0:06:18    The standard reference ranges for blood levels of 25-OH-D are controversial.

0:07:49    Vitamin D affects calcium absorption, vitamin K2 controls where that calcium goes.

0:09:25    No sunscreen provides 100% block.

0:09:51    UVA is the type of radiation we’d like to avoid.

0:11:16    In studies, the use of sunscreen didn't reduce blood 25-OH-D levels.

0:11:59    Real-world application of sunscreen is less than in studies.

0:12:50    You need need a lot less light to make vitamin D than you do to burn.

0:13:20    Do not get burned!

0:13:34    Don't avoid sunlight either!

0:14:08    Childhood exposure to burning increases risk over a lifetime.

0:15:45    Three types of skin cancer.

0:16:50    Melanoma is the worst.

0:18:14    Risk is dependant on skin type and exposure.

0:20:15    We're now indoors all the time, then we go on holiday for 2 weeks.

0:21:06    Dark skin people living far from the equator are at risk of vitamin D deficiency.

0:22:08    Endogenous vitamin D synthesis is rate-limited, taking a supplement is not.

0:23:31    25-OH-D deficiency is associated with autoimmunity, but the supplement doesn't fix the disease.

0:24:14    There may be something special about sun exposure.

0:26:12    The SPF system is flawed.

0:28:19    Buy factor 20 and re-apply.

0:29:58    Chemicals in suntan cream.

0:31:39    Endocrine disrupters.

0:32:22    Beware rodent models with unrealistic dosing.

0:33:04    Zinc or titanium dioxide are probably best.

0:35:09    The UK love their fragrances.

0:36:37    The skin microbiome.

0:38:04    Can the zinc and titanium become systemic?

0:38:58    Titanium is not inert.

0:41:06    Very small amounts are absorbed and we probably don't need to worry about it.

0:41:44    Again, some flawed rodent models out there.

]]>
no
N-Acetylcysteine: Beyond Paracetamol Overdose https://s3.amazonaws.com/nourishbalancethrive/podcast/David.Aiello.Thiolex.on.2016-03-15.at.10.34.mp3 I asked David Aiello, President BioAdvantex Pharma Inc.: of all the molecules, why study and productise N-acetylcysteine?

“That makes me think of another question, why did you marry that woman? You become fascinated with something, and your mind sees forward. I saw this as a huge business and scientific project with such a broad scope to help people. We didn't even understand the scope way back then.”

Paracetamol-induced acute liver failure.

In the US and UK, paracetamol (acetaminophen) toxicity is the most common cause of acute liver failure. When taken in normal therapeutic doses, paracetamol is safe.

The cytochrome P450 enzymes convert approximately 5% of paracetamol to a highly reactive intermediary metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI). Under normal conditions, NAPQI is detoxified by conjugation with glutathione. In cases of overdose, the pathways become saturated, leading to more NAPQI. Liver supplies of glutathione become depleted, and NAPQI remains in its toxic form in the liver, reacting with cellular membrane molecules, resulting in widespread damage and death of liver cells.

Beyond Paracetamol Overdose.

Paracetamol is not the only thing that can cause oxidative stress and cell death. Inflammation and oxidative stress are almost synonymous, and we measure both in the testing we do. Urinary P-Hydroxyphenyllactate on an organic acids test is a marker of cell turnover, and 8-Hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a marker of oxidative damage to the guanine of DNA.

Enter N-acetylcysteine.

The availability of the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine is known to be the rate-limiting substrate for glutathione resynthesis. L-cysteine is not safe to take as a supplement in high doses, what you want is the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) form. NAC doesn’t encapsulate well because the minimum effective dose is too big to fit into a capsule, and even if it did fit, the molecule would oxidise and fall apart. David's team at BioAdvantex have solved these problems by creating PharmaNAC, a large effervescent tablet sealed into a nitrogen filled blister pack.

It's important to understand that exercise is itself an antioxidant and athletes should proceed with caution before supplementing with antioxidants without testing. Context matters.

Here’s the outline of this interview with David Aiello

0:00:35    David was trained in immunology at the Stanford Herzenberg Lab.

0:01:03    He wanted to create a product that was relevant, made the right way and given at the right dose.

0:01:34    BioAdvantex have done 12 or 13 clinical trials in breathing, immunity, oxidative stress and mental health.

0:02:46    NAC is the standard of care of acetaminophen toxicity.

0:03:19    80,000 people every year are affected.

0:03:54    NAPQI.

0:04:13    Making glutathione requires glycine, glutamate and cysteine.

0:04:28    Almost every protein is less than 2% cysteine by weight.

0:05:56    You don't want L-cysteine.

0:07:30    NAC is easily oxidised.